New answers tagged

-1

The horse always the horse. The reason Calvary decimated infantry and especially archers was a war horse could weigh 1,200 and 1,400 pounds and can run at speeds up to 55 miles an hour. A rider on such an animal could ride right over massed foot soldiers killing or incapacitating many men, not by act of the rider but just the impact of the horse. You ...


3

I believe it was manufactured to be that style, An actual flight jacket wouldn't have a design with an airman posing with his hand in his pocket and something slung over his shoulder. A bunch of similar jackets here.


3

Sniper functionality was a singular task in the 1750 — 1880 era of targeting enemy command till the invention of smokeless powder in ~1880. With black powder, the sniper's position was instantly apparent therefore a 2 team sniper would be at a double loss if eliminated. Once smokeless powder was available, the scope of what a team could do was slowly ...


1

As mentioned, the collar tabs ("mostrine") denote the soldier's divisional affiliation, however the soldier may also have been affiliated with the 28th "Aosta", 20th "Friuli", 57th "Lombardia", or 54th "Napoli" divisions, as they all had very similar insignia. Without full color, it is impossible to know for certain. We do know, however, that he was an ...


0

During the War of Attrition (1967-1970) Israel used US supplied equipment. During that period the Soviet Union invested considerable resources in support for the Egyptian regime. The Soviets provided MiG and Sukhoi aircraft to the Egyptians, and during 1970 Soviet pilots took active part in operations (e.g. Rimon 20) and suffered casualties. The Soviets also ...


0

A short answer to slightly qualify the detailed answer from JMS. The equipment that was being supplied by the Warsaw Pact and NATO powers to the various parties in the Middle East during the Cold War was usually not the most modern available technology and often borderline obsolete, so the implication of the original question that the Middle Eastern ...


3

Question: Were Israeli-arab conflicts in the Cold war testing grounds for NATO and Warsaw Pact equipment? Short Answer: Mostly no, but in the end yes. More Detailed Answer: The cold war lasted from 1947 – 1991. The Arab Israili wars during that time period were 1948–49: Israel’s War Of Independence - No US Military Aid 1956: Suez Crisis ...


3

I am curious when the transition happened During World War 1. This is covered by the Wikipedia article For the UK: During World War I, Major Hesketh Hesketh-Prichard ... developed many of the modern techniques in sniping, including the use of spotting scopes and working in pairs It cites Prichard, Hesketh; Vernon, Hesketh (2004). Sniping in France ...


2

3 megatons. The Source I've seen quoted in several places is the one calculated by the Center for Arms Control and Non Proliferation given below. quotes: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists The total blast power of World War II has been calculated as three megatons by the International Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament. . ...


0

In the early Islamic empires, the state charged an alms tax on Muslim subjects (zakat). It was mainly intended for charity but war "in the path of God" (jihad) was also a permitted use for it. This tax covered practically all types of wealth, including not just gold and silver but also livestock, land rent, merchandise and agricultural produce. There was ...


-2

I think it can be possible in some cases. Take the story of Hugh Glass, for example. Hugh Glass was a mountain man and was mauled by a grizzly bear in 1823, and he was left for dead by his fellow companions. When Glass crawled over 200 miles, he sought revenge on the men who betrayed him. One of the men who did leave him was named John Fitzgerald. Glass ...


0

During the early to mid-1970s, I knew many young men at the Naval Base in Rota, Spain, who joined the Navy only to avoid jail (and departed at the earliest opportunity.)


-1

A fact pertinent to this question is that many of the Brits shot at dawn are remembered at the National Memorial Arboretum where their ages are shown, if they were adults. Many were in actual fact children who had signed up illegally, but were shot anyway when they realised their error and tried to escape the nightmare, and these are shown in the memorial ...


66

Alexander Watson says more about this in chapter 7 of The Cambridge History of the First World War, Volume II: The State: The Germans were most sparing in applying the death penalty because their justice system was staffed by professional legal personnel and influenced more than that of other forces by civilian norms. Their courts’ concern with ...


6

By combining the three tables, of known Me262 losses; claims by USAAF; and claims by RAF, in Foreman, Me 262 Combat Diary (1990), assuming that the German numbers are correct, and also that all the dates are as stated, I have obtained the following statistics. In some cases both USAAF & RAF claim the same Me262, and in one case it is not clear which type ...


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