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4

There are cases from Ancient Rome. For example, Rome's richest man, Crassus, sold houses on installment plans. An article called Men at work: public construction, labor and society at middle republican Rome, 390-168 B.C has more examples. Here's one: In the case of the Lex puteolana, the city of Puteoli was not liable for payment at once, but paid the ...


8

Here, from 428 BC, is a rather complicated real estate lease with a 60-year(!) term. 20 talents of dates per year, plus a number of other clauses and considerations. Baga'miri, son of Mitradatu, spoke of his own free-will to Belshum-iddin, son of Murashu, saying: "I will lease my cultivated field and uncultivated land, and the cultivated field and ...


7

When the First Punic War ended in 241 BC there were a number of clauses in the peace treaty. The next order of business was money. Rome wasn’t going to let Carthage walk away without handing over a large amount of talent. Carthage was to pay the Romans 3,200 talents over the next ten years. They also had to pay an indemnity of 1,000 talents immediately. ...


2

Yes, it was an enormous amount of money. Wikipedia tells us a talent was the weight of a man (or roughly 50 kg) in gold. It also states that 6000 talents, which is the bribe paid by king Auletes of Egypt to become king of Egypt to Julius Caesar, was worth $8,400,699,422.80 today. So 1000 talents would be well over a billion dollars today.


2

In support of Aaron's answer: On 24th September 1825 John Begg in Lima wrote to McCulloch Hartnell & Co(in effect Hartnell, McCulloch was in Callao) advising them(him) of 6000 dollars cash and 15000 dollars worth of goods shipped to California on the Speedy: https://archive.org/details/documentos3305189994vall/page/n397/mode/2up (my transcription) ...


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