27

That looks a great deal like the Astoria Column, in Astoria, Oregon at the mouth of the Columbia River. In particular, the image from Wikipedia show a similar base and top part. While a bit difficult to pick out on your photo, you can also see the spiraling frieze of scenes from Oregon history. As an aside, my grandfather was born and raised in Astoria in ...


25

Sex and nudity weren't as taboo then as they are now - particularly since the puritan Victorian days. Olympic athletes, for instance, raced naked. Homosexuality was pervasive enough to have been called "the principal cultural model for free relationships between citizens." And sex practices were creative enough to have left an actual word behind ...


17

Whether or not there are any surviving SPQR initials inscriptions from the time of the Roman Republic is unclear. For inscriptions, the earliest use of these initials seems to have been on coins from the reign of Augustus (27 BC to 14 AD). Given the limited space on a coin compared to, for example, a public building or a monument, it would not be surprising ...


17

Here is a picture comparing OP's image with the image of the monument at Wikipedia to confirm Jon Custer's answer: If we look at the tree at the right behind the column it seems as if the time was also roughly the same (maybe a bit later?). Edit there is some discusion in the comments that need the whole picture. That is all I could get out of the scan.


11

The Catacombs of Paris contain the remains of more than 6 million people, and much like the San Francisco situation the catacombs were established to alleviate overflowing cemeteries throughout Paris. These catacombs were built using defunct mines and quarries spread out underneath Paris, and millions of remains were moved there from cemeteries across the ...


7

In general, structures like megaliths are dated by their archaeological context. In most cases, a socket will have been excavated when the megalith was erected. When archaeologists excavate that socket, we're looking to retrieve evidence which might be used to provide a date for the socket, and so for the date the megalith was erected. For C14 dating, that ...


6

With help from user4419802's answer I have found pictures of at least two of these monuments. The first (in Palestine) is at Nahr el-Kalb north of Beirut: The other, known as the Karabel relief, is of the Hittite vassal king Tarkasnawa of Mira:


6

Singapore: over 250,000 individual graves exhumed, and more will follow. Reasonably accurate estimates of the number of individual graves exhumed can be established for Singapore where more than 20 cemeteries have been cleared. By 1985, 21 cemeteries had been cleared, and an approximate 120,000 graves had been exhumed by the Housing Development Board. ...


5

wip The apparently oldest drawing showing the surrounding — one Mercator drawing shows just the monument — is Ortelius Vivianus 1584: We then get another take on it in Braun & Hogenberg: "Civitates orbis terrarum, III.", 1588: (version from 1596) Then the Blaeu in question in „theatrum urbium Belgicae“ shows us this in 1649: (click for large)...


5

H. Shliemann in "Ilios, the city and country of the trojans", NY 1881, p. 700 wrote: Moreover, I had not then made the important discovery of the Hittite origin of the sculptures and inscriptions photographied or copied by Perrot and others at Eyuk and Boghaz Kioi (the ancient Pteria) on the Halys, at Ghiaur-Kalessi near the villages of Hoiadja and Kara-...


4

As far as I can say, the only historically supported template that the scene was based on was the Avenue of Sphinxes in Luxor (previously known as Thebes). The statues of sphinxes were there and they are still there while the additional statues of Gods were being moved there for special events.


4

Building off of Denis's answer, there was a lot of imagery of detached phalloi (plural for phallus, or penis) in ancient Greece. Here is a vase image of a woman watering a phallus garden. Some processions (like the Pompe before the Festival of Dionysus) even included pushing carts with giant penises on them that people would decorate with flowers. As noted ...


4

We all know the impossiblity of proving a negative, but I'm going to go out on a limb and claim that there was no such ruin, and that the artist added it for symmetry or effect. Why? First, while there has been plenty written about the Säule and the Kirche, what I have read about the town of Igel did not reveal any other historic tower having been there. ...


3

(Updated below with new information concerning the monument creator John Daniel.) I'm afraid that the best I have been able to do so far is narrow down the timeline for this, and provide a little more information concerning this monument. Lets look at what we can determine. We do have confirmation of the burial, From the book San Francisco or Mission ...


3

(It's a high resolution photograph, in case it will help to be able to read the text.) Thank you very much for the high resolution image. As far as I can tell, the inscription reads: ΠΟ[Μ]ΠΗΙΑΝΟΝ ΚΟ[Λ]ΛΥΤΕΑ ΤΟΝ ΣΥΓΓΡΑΦΕΑ ΣΩΣΙΓΕΝΗΣ ΠΑΛΛΗΝΕΥΣ Ο ΣΟΦΙΣΤΗΣ ΨΗΦΙΣΑΜΕΝΗΣ ΤΗΣ ΕΞ ΑΡΕΙΟΥ ΠΑΓΟΥ ΒΟΥΛΗΣ This looks like an honorary inscription set up by vote of the ...


3

There was no special name for hero statues style, at least in the Soviet Union. "Socialist realism", according to Soviet official definition, was not a particular style but a general method (as they called it, but a more adequate translation would be "philosophy") in art. It applied to all art, not specially to hero statues. Here are some of the most famous ...


2

Just like the curtain in the temple when Jesus died? English Wikipedia has a shady reference, Italian Wikipedia a [citation needed] attached to this tidbit. The other languages pages of Wikipedia never mention this, not even the French! Not for the Arc de Triomphe, not for "The Departure of the Volunteers 1792"/"Le Marseillaise", not for the sculptor Rude. ...


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