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16

No one knows where they are. Professor Aslam Pervez, an historian of Bahadur Shah II's reign and a founding member of the Mughal Trust, told The Daily Telegraph: "There are so many people who claim to be descended. The Mughals were scattered, many ran away from Delhi, to Hyderabad, after the mutiny and no-one knows who went where," he said. Due to ...


12

Sati were supposed to be voluntary. Since it was offensive to the sentiments of the Mughals, its rulers such as Akbar the Great explicitly banned involuntary sati. On a superficial level, therefore, most these women were not resistant to committing sati at all. In fact, the Mughals expended a great deal of effort trying to convince women applying for ...


11

For a possible reason, Encyclopædia Britannica says this about Bakht Khan (emphasis mine): Related on his mother’s side to the ruling house of Oudh (Ayodhya), which was deposed by the British in 1856, Bakht Khan served for a number of years as a field battery commander in the army of the British East India Company. When the rebellion broke out in ...


9

Homosexuality or at least homoeroticism was actually quite common in Mughal court life. None other than Barbur, the first Mughal Emperor himself, was known to have had a crush on a boy he saw in Kabul. He even recorded it in his own memoirs, the Barburnama. By all appearances, homosexuality was not particularly frowned upon among the Muslim ruling elite. ...


9

Political expediency. A common, populist explanation is that Aurangzeb Alamgir was religiously conservative, as taninamdar has noted. However, this is certainly not the whole picture. Though his personal religious outlook may well have been an underlying bias, political considerations were at least equally important reasons for Aurangzeb's policies - if not ...


7

First, the relationship was Mughal Empire -> Timur Empire -> Mongol ; I mean that while the Mughal Empire had distant Turco-Mongol origins, its most direct influence was that of the Timurid Empire. It was under the Timurid Empire that the Turco-Mongols adapted to the Persian culture (and passed that tradition to the Mughal Empire). The Timurid ...


6

I found something interesting This is Benoît de Boigne. In 1783 he had audience, with the Emperor in Delhi proposing discovery of new trade routes. But the Emperor put off any decision. The day after the audience, an imperial edict gave Mahadji Sindhia the government of the provinces of Delhi and Agra. In other words, Sindhia became the imperial regent and ...


6

You are confusing his epithet with his regnal name. As already mentioned, the practice of Regnal Names was common in the Mughal and some other oriental dynasties. Definition by Wiki: A regnal name, or reign name, is a name used by some monarchs and popes during their reigns, and used subsequently to refer to them. The term is simply the adjective "...


5

In the memoirs Babur himself wrote, the Bāburnāma, there's indeed a lot of beheading. Some examples (by no means an exhaustive list): Husain Mirza ordered that all prisoners should be beheaded; this not here only but wherever he defeated a rebel son, he ordered the heads of all prisoners to be struck off. And why not? Right was with him. p. 140-141 ...


5

Bahadur Shah Zafar breathed his last at 5 a.m. on the morning of Friday, 7 November 1862. He used to live in confinement in Rangoon under the supervision of Captain Nelson Davies with his two wives(Begum Zeenat Mahal and Begum Taj Mahal) and sons(Mirza Jawan Bakht by Begum Zeenat Mahal and Mirza Shah Abbas by one of Zafar's concubines Mubarak un- Nissa) and ...


4

I can't find any news story that claims that "Mughal Emperor Akbar had imposed Islam on a Hindu holy place". There are multiple news articles that summarize the history of Allahbad's name, including: Allahabad’s ancient name was ‘Prayag’, but was changed after 16th-century Mughal emperor Akbar built a fort near ‘Sangam’, the holy confluence of the Ganga, ...


4

The Taj Mahal was also built under the same ruler, Shah Jahan, and at about the same time. The wiki entry for the Taj Mahal gives us an idea of the values involved then, and now: The Taj Mahal complex is believed to have been completed in its entirety in 1653 at a cost estimated at the time to be around 32 million rupees, which in 2015 would be ...


4

I think the answer to this question has been already given by Bajirao Peshwa 1. He raided Delhi on 29 march 1737.He also had a chance to capture Delhi but he didn't. In his letter he stated that अमर्यादा झालियाने राजकारणाचा दोर तुटतो meaning 'Politics gets affected because of overdoing'. There might be a possibility that Rajputs,Sikhs or jaats get offended ...


4

Could be either of two reasons - 1. out of respect of moughal empire (which is unlikely as they were blamed for melting Silver from Red Fort) 2. fearing repercussion from all muslims who would rise against Hindu power i.e. unite against maratha to take revenge thus leading costly wars When you read historical accounts (Siyar-ul-mukhatarin or History of ...


4

Jalaluddin Muhammad took the name of Akbar(great) when he was crowned king. A new name/title is not uncommon among the Mughals - Salim took the name Jahangir, Aurangazeb became Alamgir(conqueror), Muazzam took the name Bahadur Shah(brave king), Khurram went by Shah Jahan. Where do the names come from? They just picked whatever name they wanted would be my ...


3

In a word - prestige; and thus legitimacy. Its a similar sentiment that revived the Roman Empire after its dissolution, first by Charlemagne in 800 AD and then an aborted attempt by Hitler (The third Reich) in the early 20th Century. In contemporary politics one can view attempts to establish the Islamic caliphate in a similar light.


2

There seems to have been a mixup of names at some time during history: Jodha Bai was not the name of Akbar's Rajput queen. It was, in fact, the name of Jahangir's Rajput wife, whose real name was Jagat Gosain. Since she belonged to the royal family of Jodhpur, she was also referred to as Jodha Bai. ... The myth of Jodha Bai being Akbar's Rajput wife, ...


2

I'm currently reading Indian history from 800AD to 1500AD. What I found is whenever someone declared themselves a ruler, other will unite in attacking them and bringing downfall on the said rulers family. Its easier to rule in name of some distant puppet ruler and collect revenue and not bother about the atrocities as those were committed in name of emperor. ...


2

Well, adopting Persian was more than just about a language. It gave access to a whole civilizational complex including culture, literature, governmental techniques, etc. See: Persianate Society (Wikipedia).


1

This is original pic of document placed at state museum bikaner rajasthan


1

Ghulam Hussain was very much biased towards his own religion and sect (I forget if he was Shia or Sunni) You can find this reference made by company official who translated his book Siar-al-mukhatarin to English. As per all existing historical records Aurangzeb was a bigoted ruler and wanted to convert whole of India to Islam by force (others were successful ...


1

Akbar married a Rajput princess of Amer. The princess was the elder daughter of Raja Bharmal and the aunt of Man Singh, who was one of the nine jewels of Akbar. She was the third queen of Akbar; in many places her name was referred to as Mariam-uz-zamini. In Jahangirnama it is mentioned that his mother was a Rajput princess who was an elder daughter of ...


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