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173

A hunting dog (tesem) named Akbaru is depicted in the tomb of the Fourth Dynasty pharaoh Khufu (died c. 2566 BC). There is a stone relief dated to circa 2400 BC from the Fifth Dynasty showing a dog called Beha, probably a greyhound. The name Beha is possibly an abbreviation of "behkai" (oryx antelope), a dog's name known from other contexts Beha, ...


106

This would seem to be a piece of folklore. Anthropologists have not found a single society which does not use personal names in some form; they are a human universal. However, the forms that these names take and the ways in which they are bestowed and used vary between cultures. Source: Abstract from Ellen S. Bramwell, 'Personal Names and ...


86

Most people at the time did not think the Roman Empire had fallen -- it's only from five hundred or a thousand years later that we can conclude that it did. Both points of view are reasonable. What happened around 476 is that the Western part of the Roman Empire was lost to central control. This was not the first time it had happened -- consider the Gallic ...


56

The whole point of the reign of Peter the Great was to "modernize" (westernize) Russia. Per the wikipedia article, "Peter implemented sweeping reforms aimed at modernizing Russia.[10] Heavily influenced by his advisors from Western Europe, Peter reorganized the Russian army along modern lines and dreamed of making Russia a maritime power. He faced much ...


51

At least regarding when, we can see with Google Books Ngrams. First let's look at "atomic energy" vs. "nuclear energy": In the 1940s, both terms were in use, but "atomic energy" was the far more common one, by about factor of 10 in the late 1940s and by a factor of 4 in the late 1950s. But the popularity of "atomic energy&...


43

The Persian suffix stān is much older than any of the “stans” in modern Central Asia. It goes back to proto-Indo-Iranian as represented by Sanskrit sthāna- “standing place” (already in the Rigveda) and Old Persian stāna- with the same meaning. In early New Persian (texts from the 10th century AD onwards) we have names like Turkistān “land of the Turks”, ...


31

It stands for "Titi filius Titi nepos", meaning "son of Titus and grandson of Titus" (filius and nepos mean son and grandson, respectively). This is because the consul Titus Flavius Sabinus was the son of the (non-consul) Titus Flavius Sabinus, who was in turn the son of Titus Flavius Petro. So as @SteveBird observed, the abbreivations are "filiation", i.e. ...


28

The Guinness Book of World Records says: The first known cat with a name was called Nedjem meaning 'sweet' or 'pleasant' and dates from the reign of Thutmose III (1479-1425 BC). This is also mentioned in the book The Cat in Ancient Egypt, which adds that Nedjem was found in the tomb of a nobleman named Puimre and that unlike dogs, naming cats in ancient ...


26

The names Valeria and Valerie were not in common use in Britain during the Georgian era, but they were certainly known by some via Saint Valerie of Limoges and also because Valerie (in particular) was in use in European aristocracy and literature (both British and continental works translated into English) in the 18th and 19th centuries. Valerie and Valeria ...


26

This is likely to be difficult to pin down with any certainty due to the difficulty in providing anything other than approximate dates. However, the logical place to start looking is with those civilizations which first developed writing, i.e. Sumer and Egypt (Indus and Vinca might also be candidates if we were able to decipher their scripts, but so far we ...


25

19th CENTURY HISTORIANS The term Hundred Years' War originated in the early 19th century. The Hundred Years War has become the established name for the Anglo-French conflicts that happened between 1337 and 1453. Although the designation does not refer to an actual event—the term was first used in France in the early 19th century — it usefully ...


24

"Conrad" is not a given name. "Conrad" is his first surname. Franz is his given name, along with Xaver Josef. Full name: Franz Xaver Josef Graf Conrad von Hötzendorf [given names ] [title] [surname] [nobility] [placename] WP: Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf The field marshal, with full name Franz Xaver Josef (since 1910 ...


24

No, the terms are not all contemporary. Afghanistan is recorded in the 13th century; some of the others appear to date to the 20th century. Pakistan is 1933, the others probably date from either the Soviet federation or independence in 1991 Also note hat tip to @jamesqf that Balochistan is a -stan predating Pakistan, therefore not all the -stans appeared ...


23

Somebody has compiled info about Roman dogs, mostly literary (Ovid) but also a few real ones, although sources for 'real' dogs may be questionable. https://www.unrv.com/culture/names-for-roman-dogs.php The oldest one appears to be this: Perseus. m. The name of the dog of Aemilia Tertia, daughter of the 2nd century BC Roman consul Lucius Aemilius Paullus ...


20

Warren Treadgold, one of the most eminent scholars on the Byzantine Empire puts it simply as follows: Modern historians have called this empire "Byzantine" because it was ruled not from Rome but from Constantinople, the former Byzantium Hieronymus Wolf was the earliest known historian to use the name of the Byzantine Empire's capital to refer to the ...


20

Long before well known Cerberus from Greek mythology the Mesopotamian goddess Bau, later named Gula, is depicted with a dog's head: Bau seems originally to have been goddess of the dog; as Nininsina she was long represented with a dog’s head, and the dog was her emblem. This dates from around 3300 B.C. when depictions of collared dogs appear in art. ...


19

The Korean language has a different set of phonemes compared to most Indo-European languages. Phonemes are individual sounds that are distinguished in pronunciation and used to differentiate words. For example, in English the words lot and rot are perceived as different because of the way the first letter (l versus r, typically denoted /l/ versus /r/) is ...


17

There are no specific rules, it is completely up to the founders. Many dynasties ultimately took their names from one of the ancient states of China. In any case, usually the actual choice were made in one of six ways: Reviving an Ancient Name: the dynasty began where an ancient state existed, and took its name from its ancient predecessor. Examples include ...


17

While Tecumseh was an enemy of the US while alive, his name was well known. The first ship named after him was a Canonicus-class monitor during the Civil War, some 50 years after Tecumseh's death. The other Canonicus monitors were named after other Native Americans or places with names derived from Native American words (generally - the first was renamed ...


16

William III was a member of the House of Nassau and, as the Prince of Orange a pre-eminent Dutch leader. In 1672 he became a Stadtholder in the Dutch Republic. Following the Glorious Revolution in 1688, he reigned in Britain as the King of England, Scotand, and Ireland. Note that during this time, in a display of national romanticism, the Dutch people ...


16

I’m thinking I should rephrase my comment above as an answer. I believe the correct answer would be “they didn’t”, and that’s why. While the surname and name of Cao Cao almost match in modern Mandarin (except the tone is different, Cáo Cāo, so they don’t), the similarity is but a figment produced by the language development that led to modern Mandarin. He ...


14

Because they are Catholic. No other reason. Doesn't matter if you are a boy or girl. It's very common practise to give children many baptismal names, including Maria. To both girls and boys. Perhaps not today, but when I was baptized 60 years ago, it definitely was. My parents 'blessed' me with that name too. Being a boy, and attending a non-Catholic school, ...


13

An article from the Smithsonian magazine titled "The History of the Doughnut" also states that Captain Hanson Gregory invented the toroidal doughnut. The reason for the invention seems less clear. The article notes that: Some cynical doughnut historians maintain that Captain Gregory did it to stint on ingredients, others that he thought the hole might ...


12

Short answer: The longest chain of the same personal name used from father to son from generation to generation that I know of seems to be at least 22 generations according to my sources. Long answer: One example of a long chain of using the same personal name is: Louis XVII of France, the Dauphin in the Temple, was the son of Louis XVI, the son of ...


12

Short Answer There doesn't seem to be any evidence for this. More likely, his visit to Berlin and sites associated with Martin Luther were factors, but there is no conclusive, documented evidence of this either. King Sr. himself said he choose the names of two uncles. Nonetheless, although his autobiography makes no mention of him having studied Hebrew ...


12

One additional thing to add to the excellent answers already given is that -stan is actually used productively in Persian for other words as well, such as bimarestan (بیمارستان) for “hospital” — literally “land of patients”. Or gulestan (گلستات) for “garden” — literally “land of the flowers.” So no matter what the historical record shows about the first ...


11

I am restricting this to rulers titles; there are some families were one of the sons gets the name of the father and so use numerals, but they are out of scope. It is not "William I" or "William I", but "William I of Germany" and "William I of England". The number is used to indicate between different holders of the same title and same name. So, if we are ...


11

Fantine I don't believe "Fantine" is a proper name, that is no mother ever names a child "Fantine" it's more of a nickname. It comes from the same root as "infant". It basically means "babyish"... which being an orphan girl matches her character. This name was used by Victor Hugo for the mother of Cosette in his novel ...


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