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56

The whole point of the reign of Peter the Great was to "modernize" (westernize) Russia. Per the wikipedia article, "Peter implemented sweeping reforms aimed at modernizing Russia.[10] Heavily influenced by his advisors from Western Europe, Peter reorganized the Russian army along modern lines and dreamed of making Russia a maritime power. He faced much ...


51

At least regarding when, we can see with Google Books Ngrams. First let's look at "atomic energy" vs. "nuclear energy": In the 1940s, both terms were in use, but "atomic energy" was the far more common one, by about factor of 10 in the late 1940s and by a factor of 4 in the late 1950s. But the popularity of "atomic energy&...


28

The Guinness Book of World Records says: The first known cat with a name was called Nedjem meaning 'sweet' or 'pleasant' and dates from the reign of Thutmose III (1479-1425 BC). This is also mentioned in the book The Cat in Ancient Egypt, which adds that Nedjem was found in the tomb of a nobleman named Puimre and that unlike dogs, naming cats in ancient ...


26

The names Valeria and Valerie were not in common use in Britain during the Georgian era, but they were certainly known by some via Saint Valerie of Limoges and also because Valerie (in particular) was in use in European aristocracy and literature (both British and continental works translated into English) in the 18th and 19th centuries. Valerie and Valeria ...


14

Because they are Catholic. No other reason. Doesn't matter if you are a boy or girl. It's very common practise to give children many baptismal names, including Maria. To both girls and boys. Perhaps not today, but when I was baptized 60 years ago, it definitely was. My parents 'blessed' me with that name too. Being a boy, and attending a non-Catholic school, ...


10

Most of those names aren't particularly wierd, at the time - and some not today. It is simply that many people in those days were vastly better educated in Biblical & Classical subjects (where many of those names originate) than almost anyone today.


9

Since there seems to be a little disparity between the questions title and body, let me clarify that this answer addresses the last part of the question(emphasis mine): To what religious group does the Flushing Remonstrance refer with the word "Egyptians"? If Islam, why is this listed distinctly from "Turks"? Or is it not associated with ...


5

This can't really be reconciled historically, because Abraham was written as a mythological figure, not a historic one. The Abraham story cannot be definitively related to any specific time, and it is widely agreed that the patriarchal age, along with The Exodus and the period of the judges, is a late literary construct that does not relate to any period in ...


4

It doesn't appear to be a common name in the era, but it did exist in England From ancestry.co.uk, I found only the following entries in baptism records from 1811-1831: Valorie Blower and Valeria Wright. The reference to Valerie Mc Morione Evans (as shown in the screenshot below) appears to have arisen from an incorrect transcription, as she was actually ...


4

According to wp, in Germany, family names appeared first in the cities (from the 12th century onwards). Having no family name was still quite common in the 14th century and in the countryside family names became only necessary in the 17th or 18th century. If we look at a few name lists, most Minnesängers from the 12th to 14th centuries seem to have had ...


3

The historiographical description of the use of the term is presented in Wikipedia: The first use of the term "Byzantine" to label the later years of the Roman Empire was in 1557, 104 years after the empire's collapse, when the German historian Hieronymus Wolf published his work Corpus Historiæ Byzantinæ, a collection of historical sources. The ...


3

Note I'm not intending this to be the answer, but rather a summary of my research that will hopefully help you along. My line of thinking towards a possible solution went along these lines: Trends that have existed in published works; Origin of the abbreviation "St."; Possible influences on this (though it may be quite difficult to choose a ...


3

De Americaensche zee-roovers In 1678 Alexandre Olivier Exquemelin published "De Americaensche zee-roovers". A reprint of the original Dutch text can be found at The Digital Library for Dutch Literature (DBNL) I'm not sure whether a literal translation of zee-roover is sea-robber or just sea-rover. At least one English translation has parts written in the ...


3

If by "real name" you mean the name he had at birth, & we can be 100% sure "Contumeliosus" was not his birth name, that information is likely lost in time. We're talking about the 6th century, when most writings on perishable surfaces are long lost. If you mean the name his contemporaries knew him by, I checked my copy of the letters of Avitus of Vienne ...


3

Abelardo Moralejo Laso addressed the etymology of the river's name in the 1980 article "Notas acerca de la hidronimia galega" (pp. 167-170). You are correct that there is no cinnabar near the Miño River, and there are competing etymologies for the river's name. Moralejo Laso notes that the word "minium", ostensibly for cinnabar, was also often used for other ...


2

Short Answer: In my humble opinion, religious and biblical names probably became common in western Europe centuries before family names became common. I do not think that people would be afraid of widespread use of a few personal names leading to confusion between different people with the same personal name, and so avoid using religious names. I think that ...


2

I know its been a while, but it's a tribe in the Amazon, the Matsigenka.


1

Although the answer is ticked as correct and helpful, it's completely wrong regarding naming origins. The name Asia was initially given by ancient Greeks to modern western Anatolia - later was used on about the same boundaries by the Romans for the roman province of Asia, which the Greeks called Asia or Asiane. The term Asia is of unidentified etymology. As ...


1

There are still quite a lot of uses of "atomic" in this kind of context floating around, particular in organisation names. For eaxmple, in the UK, the Atomic Weapons Establishment is responsible for the maintenance of the UK's nuclear weapons arsenal; the International Atomic Energy Agency is a body involved in use of nuclear power - I'm sure there ...


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