29

The answer is a very solid yes although I'd prefer the word Intervene rather than invade. India was one of the key possessions of British and Indian trade was crucial to British economy at that time. As long as British economy was strong, Britain would have been able to field expeditionary forces to thwart French ambitions worldwide. So that's where ...


19

Napoleon fled (if that's the right word) in some style, travelling with a "suite" that included three generals, two French counts and countesses and their four children, ten army officers, a doctor, two cooks and 26 other servants along with the imperial dinner service and silver plate and "several boatloads of luggage". So this clearly wasn't act of a ...


18

The attribution certainly predates Lenin. A Google Book search indicates that it was well-established by at least 1890: "Wenn Napoleon sagte: »on s'engage et puis on voit!« so bezeichnet er damit nur das Verfahren aller selbstständigeren Heerund Trnppenführer." [Monatshefte für Politik und Wehrmacht, p.284, 1889] "Le mot de Napoléon : « On s'...


17

Fortunately for Napoleon, not speaking French well was still very common in France in this period. In 1794, only one tenth of the population were fluent in French. The pre-Napoleonic revolutionary government made strides to rectify this by banning all non-Parisian French dialects for official business, but they didn't devote the resources to educate the ...


17

Short Answer: You're both correct. Which date to pick for ending the French Revolution is a matter of opinion. Your friend is not wrong. The downfall and execution of Maximilien de Robespierre is considered by many to be an end date for the French Revolution. For many historians, the end of Robespierre coincided with the end of the Revolution itself. ...


17

Napoleon is widely described as either a demigod or a demon / devil, though, as Danila Smirnov mentioned, not immortal. Might you be misremembering this, or perhaps something like it: Napoleon . . . [is] sometimes cast as a demigod, sometimes as a demon, practically always seen as a figure considerably larger than life. Probably no other mortal has ...


16

Yes, the two wars were indeed related, and even rather closely. Both wars were tied to Napoleon's ongoing war with Britain. Napoleon had set up the Continental system to boycott British trade; this led to the invasion of Russia, while Britain's impressment of American sailors led to the War of 1812 with the United States of America. Having earlier failed ...


14

Your last quote from Bourrienne seems to be the most correct version. Essentially, the context is that Napoleon held a very high opinion of the East and wanted to organize expeditions at least as far as India. The quote seems to have been said before his expedition to Egypt, and was likely in reference to further eastward expeditions. Since Bourrienne was ...


13

France was in 1792 attacked by a coalition of states, that included several Italian states. Although the Papal States and Republic of Venice was not amongst them, Naples and Sicily was. This put the Papal States as well as Venice in the middle of the war between Austria and France, since Venice was located between France and Austria and the Papal States ...


12

My hesitant conclusion, made firmer by reading the answers above, is that they are in essence genuine remarks. Though what you quote is an amalgam of three sayings from the same passage assembled together as one quote! As @Drux noted the source of the quote is clearly Sentiment de Napolon Ier Sur Le Christianisme by M. le Chevalier de Beauterne. For the ...


12

The book A História dos Símbolos Nacionais, published by the Brazilian Senate, states that indeed, [The flag] was conceived by Jean-Baptiste Debret, French painter and founder of our Academy of Fine Arts, inspired by some military flags used in his country at the time of the Great Revolution and the Napoleonic Era, from which he copied the ...


11

This quote appears in several mid-1800s texts, including the above-referenced "Sur Le Christianisme" text. Henry Parry Liddon wrote a footnote regarding the quote suggesting its authenticity. He references another Bertrand source, "Sentiment de Napoleon sur la Divinite de Jesus Christ." He cites a response to the author of the preface to Campagnes d'Egypte ...


11

The War of 1812 between Britain and America was very directly related to the Napoleonic Wars in Europe (which included the French invasion of Russia). The War of 1812 was a by-product of the Napoleonic War of 1803 to 1814. It's origins lay in the increasingly oppressive measures adopted by France and Britain to undermine the economies of their rivals, and ...


11

A valid premise for research might be that simply "Murat" is looking and perhaps even sounding like a word or name of Turkish/Arabic origin, therefore Joachim Murat may have a family name of similar decent. One problem not accounted for is that this might be a false premise, since it was apparently left unchecked whether "murat" might be actually something ...


10

Here is an ancester chart for Joachim Murat's son Lucien from wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucien_Murat#Ancestry1 All Joachim Murat's ancestors up to Pierre Murat seem to have married women with French surnames. Thus the ancestors back for three generations seem to have lived in France. His ancestors farther back could have lived in France or ...


10

To expand on the answer by Giter, here is the original French of de Bourrienne's retelling of that passage (V 2, pp 44) from an 1829 French edition in the NY Public Library: My take is that Quinn's version sounds like a mis-remembering of de Bourrienne's, a simplified recollection. But it is more difficult to imagine how de Bourrienne's version would arise ...


10

We have no evidence that Napoleon was ill during June 1815. None. Nada. Zilch. While on St. Helena, Napoleon wrote extensively about his final campaign, blaming Ney and Grouchy extensively and usually unjustly, demonstrating great ease with finding excuses for the loss. Yet never once does he mention any personal ailments. Neither are there accounts by any ...


9

In addition to Drux's fine answer, Napoleon's ability to evade the British was down to a number of factors but miscommunication by the British played a very large part. When Sir Sidney Smith was assigned to the Levant Squadron, he was also given a diplomatic mission by the British Cabinet. However, this additional role was not communicated to his superiors ...


9

In the book Napoleon After Waterloo: England and the St. Helena Decision By Michael John Thornton the status of Napoleon is discussed in great detail, including questions of law. There are several considerations: Napoleon had been declared a criminal and a madman in the Declaration of the Powers against Napoleon. "Accordingly, the Powers declare that ...


9

No The only ceremonial garments left today from the actual coronation are the dress and court train of Countess Bérenger, wife of State Councilor Jean Bérenger: … would be the only vestiges preserved among the ceremonial costumes worn during the Coronation. (fr:WP) The dress of Countess Bérenger: one of the last vestiges of Napoleon's Coronation In 1804, ...


8

The flag design most closely associated with Napoleon would be his personal command flag. If he had one. Pending the discovery of the design of any personal flag of Napoleon, the flag design most associated with him would be the regimental colors carried on the same staffs as the eagles of his regiments. This site: http://www.warflag.com/napflags/...


7

The short answer to your question is that for much of his early life Napoleon was a Corsican patriot but only a French opportunist. He inherited from his father a fierce love of both Corsica and Pasquale Paoli, and did not consider himself French nor was he particularly loyal to France outside of the fact that it gave him an opportunity to move up in life. ...


7

You will have a difficult time convincing me that Napoleon was the best battlefield technician of all time, when he was (at best!) only the third most expert French practitioner of that art during the Napoleonic Era; Davout and likely Desaix would head that list, and all of Soult, Lannes and Massena can at least be argued as more expert than Napoleon). ...


7

Napoleon abolished the revolutionary calendar in 1805. It was never very popular. Catholics disliked having their saints' days dropped, and having a day of rest every 10 days instead of every seven probably made it a tough sell. The Cult of the Supreme Being never caught on. Much of France's population remained Catholic during this time, and many of the ...


6

The Cabinet Historique et topographique militaire was created by a decree the 28th August 1794. The decree goes in detail about the work and the organization to the point of naming who does what. A second decree (16/06/1795) has also elements of organization. The decrees don't mention office hours. The work done by the bureau in support of the armies was ...


6

Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; To Althea, from Prison Napoleon was imprisoned. He could not travel beyond the confines of the island, nor could anyone visit him. "Prison" isn't defined by the quality of the cell, but by the restrictions on liberties and the possession ...


6

Being a voracious reader, there is little doubt that Napoleon may have read the Jesuit translation of the Art of War by Sun Tzu. He may have dismissed the wisdom of Sun Tzu or at least never mentioned the Asian strategist, because of the preference he had for the authors of antiquity. Perhaps Sun Tzu simply confirmed that which he had already gleaned from ...


6

I will try to answer your "original" question in a roundabout way by stating that the period after the Napoleonic wars was "healthier" for France in diplomatic terms. This was true even though France lost back essentially all the territory she gained after the French Revolution. From at least the time of Louis XIV (if not XIII) until the time of Napoleon, ...


6

Of course the US would never have invaded Canada if the leadership didn't think that the US could win. They thought it could win because Britain was already in a mortal battle. The British commitment of forces to the war was quite minor for that same reason. Once Napoleon had been defeated, the British committed more forces and successfully raided ...


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