13

I think there are three main reasons. First, the elites usually do not want to resign their powers. For example, East Germany leadership opposed the reunification to the end. Historically the elites are much more likely to support secessionism than unification. Second, as Wladimir Palant pointed out, unification with Romania requires abandoning any hope to ...


13

In 1905 there was an attempt to make an entire "colored" (iow: Native American and freed slave) state in the United States. Sadly, Congress did not go for it. Today the American Indian tribes (aka: Nations) are in fact still in existence, with their own laws and elected governments. They even occasionally have their own election contraversies. Many also ...


11

It didn't - Germany was united several times even prior to the unification of France, Spain or England under strong central governments. Otto I and Frederick I (Barbarossa) being two examples of Emperors who united Germany long before Spain united under the Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella in 1469; Louis XIV captivated his nobles and courtiers at ...


10

Google suggests as early as 1848 Stray Subjects, arrested and bound over, That chap as went in fust thar ain t nobuddy ef he has got a swaller tailed coat on My money's as good as his n and it's a free country to day This young


10

Yes. The Latin League was founded in 7th century B.C. by a set of Italian states. The capital city was Alba Longa. Delian League was founded in 5th century BC Peloponnesian League was formed between 6 and 4th centuries BC League of Corinth was formed during the winter of 338 BC/337 BC Achaean League existed between 280 BC and 146 BC In central, barbarian, ...


8

The earliest political body designed to harness the power of multiple independent sovereign states for trade and military purposes we have a historical record for appears to be the Awussa League. The Assuwa League was an alliance of city-states and kingdoms formed to oppose Hittite influence in Anatolia, dating to just before the 14th century BCE.


7

I am answering only one of your questions: How come no native American states have formed? Arguably, some states have formed. Paraguay: According to Wikipedia, 90% of the population speaks Guaraní. About 95% of the people are mestizo (mixed Spanish and Guaraní Indian descent. Little trace is left of the original Guaraní culture except the language, ...


6

The US very often offers aid, in cases of disaster as mentioned by Oldcat, but also to countries that are having economic or security issues. As pointed out by Semaphore the answer to the question is: No, not all countries that exist/ed at the same time as the US have been offered aid to I also think it's important to understand what exactly is "aid" ...


6

On the face of it, simply because the Treaty of Prague stipulated as much: Article IV His Majesty the Emperor of Austria recognises the dissolution of the present German Confederation and grants his permission to a new design of Germany without the participation of the Austrian Imperial State. Likewise, His Majesty promises to recognise the narrower ...


5

I don't think their current majority is an insurmountable problem for any immigration theory. At roughly the same time the coastal German tribes were migrating to England, and the southern Slavic people were migrating into the Balkans. Both are clearly a majority in those locations today. My main problem with the immigrationist theory is that it (very very ...


5

“Europe” and “Asia” as distinct cultural units are defined by Herodotus almost at the beginning of his histories.(1.4.4: τὴν γὰρ Ἀσίην καὶ τὰ ἐνοικέοντα ἔθνεα βάρβαρα οἰκηιεῦνται οἱ Πέρσαι, τὴν δὲ Εὐρώπην καὶ τὸ Ἑλληνικόν ἥγηνται κεχωρίσθαι. ) Herodotus lived in the 5th century BC.


5

Even today I doubt that there is such a thing like a "European culture". The cultural differences between different countries are huge. I'm not just talking about the difference between a Nordic country and a Mediterranean country, even neighboring countries like Belgium (where I'm from) and Germany are quite different, culturally. Much has to do with ...


5

I would argue against the premise. Which Switzerland is undeniably a mountainous region it still obeys the general rule of being on one side of a mountain. This map is a physical clue to what is going on, Switzerland is actually based around the Swiss Plateau, not around the alps. If we reach back into history just before Switzerland came together into ...


4

The US Articles of Confederation may be an example. Each colony/state were considered sovereign under it while they ceded some powers, such as common defense, to the federal Congress. Since the colonies were never recognized by other powers as separate nations but as part of the US, it may not fit your question though. There have been a number of ...


4

http://www.itu.int/en/about/Pages/history.aspx International Telegraph Union 1865 as a result of the International Telegraph Convention predates the Universal Postal Union. Attempts to claim the German Empire or the Catholic Church as supranational organisations flounder on the concept of "nationality" post dating the Westphalian state.


3

As far as I understand this question, it seems to be based on false assumptions. When did Americans start to use the expression? Immediately when they became Americans? In fact, when they were still loyal subjects of the king! As they also were lucky enough to have had the Rights of Englishman. It was inherited? Longman dictionary: it’s a free country ...


3

It can. Countries are decidedly not the primary unit of analysis, nor are regions. It's got its name because it looks at the world and how the emerging structures create and recreate unequal relationships. Boundaries are fluid and of low importance. Whether for a state, a region, or an empire. That we see it often attached to entire countries now is ...


3

In 1783. Specifically, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on 3 September 1783. Interestingly, as the Wikipedia article notes, Article 1 of the treaty, in which King George III acknowledged the United States' existence as "free sovereign and independent states", is the only part of the treaty that remains in force.


3

I came across a passage from Colin McEvedy that went into this somewhat. There is, of course, a conflict of interest between continental and littoral peoples but this does not become overt until the continental communities become organized into a centralized state. It is only then that the national aspirations are formulated and that there is a drive for '...


2

The Kingdom of The Netherlands was formed in 1813 to form a buffer against France. The Belgians weren't asked anything. King Willy 1 (William of Orange) was simply a good negotiator. The allies didn't want to do it all over again, so uniting (now) The Netherlands with (now) Belgium seemed a good idea. There are many reasons why it didn't work out: William ...


2

Other nations were formed as a result of major wars, some would say civil wars. Arguably the first nation-state was that of France, after the end of the Hundred Years' War in 1453. If you've been at war for over 100 years, it really defines your loyalties. Spain was defined by the war that united Andulusia with Castile, ending in 1492, then an 1640 war ...


2

I'm not sure about southern Hesse specificially, but many of the states in southern Germany simply didn't want to join the new Confederation. The German history magazine "G - Geschichte" writes in an issue about Bismark (issue of October 2010) on page 18 Deutschland und Frankreich - vier Jahre schon herrschte kalter Krieg zwischen ihnen. Das Königreich im ...


2

1) largest area. According to Wikipedia's list of largest empires, the largest thalassocracy or colonial empire was the British Empire about 1920 with 3.35 million square kilometers or 13.71 million square miles, 23.84 percent of the world's land area of 148,940,000 square kilometers or 57,500,000 square miles. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


2

Not sure if you are asking about the complete expression 'it's a free country', but the concept of freedom and the shorter expression 'free country' was already used when the USA was created. In general, if you read Burke, it is always there. Burke generally liked America, he was against the war, against the taxation that broke the colonial pact, and before ...


2

There were two Hesses in 1866, Hesse-Cassel and Hesse-Darmstadt, the Grand Duchy of Hesse. Hesse-Cassel was annexed by the Kingdom of Prussia in 1866, along with the Kingdom of Hanover, to have a corridor between two groups of Prussian possession. The parts of Hesse-Darmstadt north of the Main were kept by the Grand Duke in 1866 and became part of the ...


1

The saying seems to predate 1826, when Edward Thornton Tayloe wrote (in Mexico 1825-1828, p. 128) that: We have more than once since we have been in Mexico been induced to inquire if we were in a free country.


1

There is a false premise in the question. Namely, Europe as a political unit has always been a step ahead of Europe as a cultural unit. I found this question while looking for information on an 18th century treatise that set out the benefits of a political union in Europe -- which as far as I know is the earliest that this idea was espoused in this way. Yet,...


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