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31

It's historical, dating from before the two colours represented different ranks instead of different branches of the army, as a cost-saving measure (essentially). From Wikipedia: The Army origin explains why the color silver outranks gold in Air Force officer insignia. In the early 19th century, Army infantry colonels wore gold eagles, while all ...


22

Wikipedia (in German) has a long and fascinating article on the history of the German national colours. Without getting in all the details, it seems that the link with the colours of the Holy Roman Empire symbols isn't historically established and might have been a later rationalisation for the choice. Still according to this article, the first use of these ...


18

As has been noted, the eagle became the national bird because it was chosen to be on the Great Seal, designed by Charles Thomson. The idea did not emerge out of thin air, however; the eagle is a very popular emblem with a very long history in heraldry. Two of the three committees designing the seal included the eagle in some form. Thus, Thomson would have ...


15

The top picture is quite obviously a coin with a crude depiction of a seventh century "byzantine" emperor holding a globe with a cross on top. The early Muslim coins issued in former Roman territories were obviously based on Roman coins which the subject people were more familiar with, or else made with reused and modified Roman coin dies. In 636 the ...


10

I believe it is ultimately inherited from the colors of the holy roman empire.


9

According to this research the symbolism was developed by Canadiens living along the St Lawrence River by the early 1700s. The coats of arms for Quebec and Ontario (est. 1867) each feature a triple maple leaf design, and that might suggest some lineage of the maple leaves standing in for the triple-fleur-de-lis (i.e. yellow iris) that symbolized the French ...


6

The oldest reference of the fable is in Babrius's collection, dated to before 200AD. From there it spread eastwards, explaining the Asian versions. The Iroquois version may be independent; some estimates of its origin are as early as 1142. Given how common the symbolism is, the story may have had much older, or independent, origins.


6

Google suggests as early as 1848 Stray Subjects, arrested and bound over, That chap as went in fust thar ain t nobuddy ef he has got a swaller tailed coat on My money's as good as his n and it's a free country to day This young


5

It's a big scary powerful bird of prey - which is always popular as symbols. It's pretty distinctive and AFAIK only lives on the North American continent. Benjamin Franklin famously didn't agree. In a letter to his daughter, Benjamin Franklin wrote: I wish that the bald eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country, he is a bird of ...


4

One after-the-fact explanation suggested by some NCOs is that the more-malleable gold suggests that the bearer is being "molded" for his or her responsibilities -- as a field officer (second lieutenant) or staff officer (major). However, this explanation may be more clever than correct, for while the insignia for second lieutenant and major are ...


4

The bald eagle is the symbol of the United States due to its presence on the Great Seal of the United States. The Great Seal was developed by several different Congressionally-appointed committees and went through various design changes. The first appearance of a bird on a proposed design was a phoenix, recommended by William Barton, an expert on heraldry. ...


4

It is because the Umayyads either copied Byzantine coins, or reused Byzantine dies, changing the text.


3

National symbols are always non-partisan; but from time to time one party or another may wish to disassociate itself from them. In 2012 the Democrats were not the least shy about use of the American flag, because they were in power. Since the 2016 election, Democrats have deliberately shied away from using the flag. This is a means of expressing displeasure ...


3

National flags represent the country... or the state? Ok, in the books it is the country, but the state is who actually manages the country. And of course, patriotism and nationalism are powerful tools, so it makes sense to use them. If you are lucky, the state (and those who support the status quo) will not use those tools in a partisan way, but for the ...


3

According to FOTW Flags Of The World, the sun symbol appeared in the flag proposed by the National Assembly's Constitutional Commission in 2003. The proposal saw some opposition and never became law. The symbol is: ... a 15-ray yellow sun comprised of three irregular concentric circles. The image is inspired by rock paintings in the desert cave of ...


3

There is a fine PDF booklet by Raymond Oliver, then curator of the Air Force museum at McClellan AFB in Sacramento, "Why is the Colonel Called "Kernal" which explains the origin of military ranks and their associated insignia.


2

I think what you are trying to ask is, why is the identification of this seal on the seal itself necessary? Isn't it self-evident that its a seal? This is fairly typical form for a seal historically. Historically, the majority of seals were circular in design, although ovals, triangles, shield-shapes and other patterns are also known. The design ...


2

Let me present a specific example from Central Europe. The Árpád-stripes: Originally it was the heraldic device of the Árpád-dynasty. Of course there were no nations of the modern sense in the medieval times, and the Kingdom of Hungary had a different flag, but still, considering that the Árpáds ruled Hungary for more than 300 years, it became quite a ...


1

In the mid 60's I served in the Army Reserve. Military Army and Marine officer ranks were explained by an instructor as follows. Symbols follow their appearance in nature. Going from low to high; silver is found at a higher elevation than gold, oak leaves (including other reasons) still higher, eagles still higher, and stars highest. Sure hope this ...


1

The phrase has been there for a long time - it is evident on drafts before the existence of the United States - check wikipedia, which also notes that there isn't a great deal of good documentation about the history of the seal. Ultimately, I think that this is an artifact of a time when people were more fond of redundant naming.


1

The bald eagle was not chosen to be the national bird of the United States. It as chosen to be the supporter of the coat of arms of the United States of America when the great seal was adopted. The reason why the bald eagle was chosen to be the supporter in the achievement of arms of the United States of America when the great seal of the United States was ...


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