Hot answers tagged

52

Mistaking the Sims for a cruiser is easy: a Sims-class destroyer has the same number of turrets (3) as the majority of American cruisers, while most American destroyers of the time had two, four, or five turrets. Without anything to provide a sense of scale, it's easy to mistake one for the other, particularly if you're not getting close enough to count the ...


26

Misidentifying of ships from scout planes was a consistent problem for both sides in the Pacific Theater. In fact, it seems that getting a scouting report exactly right was more the exception rather than the rule. In particular, pilots appeared to have a distinct tendency to inflate the importance (or size) of the ships they were sighting. According to ...


19

Before considering how to disengage from a boarding action, I think you have to consider the difficulties and risks of bringing about a boarding action in the first place. To evade a boarding attempt by manoeuvre was relatively easy. It was in practice very difficult to get near enough to a ship to attempt to board her unless it was also her intention to ...


13

I'd like to provide an alternative explanation that addresses the question of, "How could two independent reports contain exactly the same mistakes?", which isn't specific to this battle, but would apply here: The consequences of strict hierarchical rigidity in Japanese culture and an emphasis on conformity. This is an alternative (but not ...


6

The following is sourced from a short magazine article 'Fall of the Dutch East Indies', by Lt.-Commander F.C. van Oosten, and doesn't fully address all aspects of the question, but is intended to provide a little more information on the events preceding the Battle of the Java Sea, in the hope of shedding some further light on decision making. On February 3 ...


5

Short Answer Details on the 1730s and 1740s Persian Navy can be pieced together to some extent from the Floor article you already found (but couldn't access), plus a smattering of other sources (including the Peter Good article found by Steve Bird). In short, prior to 1734 the Persians didn't have a navy of their own to speak of. From then until the late ...


5

I'm inclined to write an answer with a different tone to that of the other one: namely, the Dutch never had control of the seas and as such they couldn't lose it. The strategic options that a naval power has include the control of the seas, denying the seas to the enemy, or, in essence, fighting on an equal footing (i.e., not using overpowering numbers to ...


5

Not an answer by itself - but an explanation of the trade-off against vessel draught when selecting a harbour. First, the distinction between a port and a harbour: A port comprises the (always man-made) facilities for loading and unloading both cargo and passengers/crew from a vessel. A harbour comprises the facilities (always at least partially natural ...


3

Reval was an important shipping center for foodstuffs from current and former Swedish territories in modern Sweden,Finland, and Estonia. The Russian Baltic fleet "put in" at that port for supplies for the long journey to the Far East. Which is why its (uninterrupted) journey "began" there, even though it was based in St. Petersburg. The ...


2

The typical boarding action in the age of sail included grappling hooks being thrown, to pull the two ships together. Once connected, additional means to connect the ships together included boat hooks and similar implements. Once in close proximity, the rigging of the ships could also become fouled, i.e. tangled together. In either case, the way to disengage ...


2

I like @Schwern's answer for its thoroughness with which the international report has been perused. Nevertheless, it seems as if some detail that is in my source isn't as clearly brought out there. My source is Ryotaro Shiba's 'Clouds Above the Hill, Vol. 2'. I've previously commented on Shiba's accuracy here. The author does comment and generalize more than ...


1

I'm going to go with a "no". Having investigated some different research lines here, nothing gave a conclusive "yes", so I think this wasn't a systematic practice even if some captains may have engaged in the practice. Reasons The history of performance reviews was generally inconclusive; The history of performance reviews in the Royal ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible