51

Purely fictional. I have never heard of such an incident and, as with the large, bright red insignia painted on the conning towers, it puts the submarine in unnecessary danger for no advantage. In order to transmit, a U-Boat must be on or near the surface putting them in obvious danger to visual spotting and radar. While the first two transmissions come at ...


47

This appears to be a distortion of the Battle of Bodange, May 10th, 1940. The 5th company of the 2nd Battalion of the 1st Regiment of Chasseurs Ardennais (about 120 men) delayed elements of the 1st Panzer Division (not 7th Panzer) on the first day of the Battle of France (and Belgium). 40 men possibly refers to specifically the surrender of the 3rd Stand (...


33

As Pieter commented, the 11th Army and much of its heavy artillery moved to Leningrad, but much of its infantry did not. Armies and army corps are administrative units to coordinate hundreds of thousands of men, their vehicles, material, etc... Divisions and other subordinate units are swapped in and out as needed. Even armies are cannibalized, shortly after ...


23

After the MG 34 was introduced in 1935, the Wehrmacht almost immediately wanted improvements. The MG 34 was milled from specially alloyed steel which is slow and expensive. Stamped parts could make a lighter, more reliable, cheaper to mass produce gun using lower grade steel. However, getting stamped parts to work at the tolerances and stresses of a firearm ...


16

There were several rail lines east of Volga First, let's look at the map of soviet rail lines in 1941 with accompanying legend As we can see, there are two rail lines, both of them single track and normal gauge. One goes from Astrakhan and split towards Stalingrad and towards Saratov. This one is likely used to supply Stalingrad front. Other is more to the ...


15

This is known to have happened sometimes. From the Führer: Hitler no longer appreciated the scale of these exceptional requests. As early as 14 January 1939 he criticised the numerous applications for betterment before the top representatives of the NSDAP. Witness to this "telling off" in the new Reich Chancellery was Günter Kaufmann, then ...


12

There is a tale of communication between a convoy and a Luftwaffe aircraft. The convoy was one of the Arctic convoys to the USSR, the aircraft was a BV 138 flying boat. That kind of plane had no business attacking a convoy with decent anti-aircraft armament; its job was to stay in sight of the convoy and transmit homing signals for U-boats and strike ...


11

Admiral Kuznetsov's finest hour June 1941 was a hectic month in Moscow. More and more reports from agents, spies, military attachés, aerial and other reconnaissance, were confirming the fact that Germany prepares for an attack on the USSR in the coming days. Much was written about Stalin's indecisiveness in those days, as he was getting more and more aware ...


10

I found an article in Weather, the Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, that discusses the forecasting for D-Day. The various maps in the article make it clear that the Pas de Calais is not far enough from Normandy to have significantly different summer weather on average. The decision for Normandy had been made by the start of 1944, well before it ...


9

This is only partial and rather speculative answer, but it is a bit too long for comment. A short historical overview of the Latvian State History Archive (LSHA) is found (in Latvian) on its webpage, which was linked in my original comment: http://www.latvijasarhivi.lv/index.php?&115 Note that while it is called "state history archive" it has ...


9

Indirectly Historically, Sweden ended trade with Germany in November 1944. That is a bit late in the war, and Allies pressured them to do something much earlier, but there was always a threat of German army stationed in Norway and Sweden was practically isolated in Scandinavian peninsula. Add to that significant part of population that were anti-Communist ...


8

Every story has three sides. One side's truth, the other side's truth, and what actually happened. Since 1933, Austria was a one-party state ruled by the Vaterländische Front, an Austrofascist party, with first Engelbert Dollfuss and then Kurt Schuschnigg as Chancellor with the power to rule by decree. While they shared much of the same ideology with both ...


8

I have tracked down the Dahl quote from Going Solo: We had nine Hurricanes at Haifa and the same number of pilots, and in the days that followed we were kept very busy. Our main job was to protect the navy ... every day they would sail up the coast past Tyre and Sidon to bombard the Vichy French forces in the mountains around the Damour river. And whenever ...


7

I convert my comment into an answer: No, absolutely not. Taunting, as in the movie, would have been a death sentence for the U Boat. The Germans were well aware about High Frequency Direction Finding or HF/DF. They knew any conversation lasting longer than 20 seconds was highly dangerous. They didn't know the exact specifications, but more than enough to ...


7

No. Apart from Solomon's Temple being just unavailable as an actual model of any ascertainable concreteness (and Solomon being in all probability a fictional character to begin with [Finkelstein/Silberman: David and Solomon]), this 'cultural appropriation' was quite out of proportion for anything the Nazis wanted to adopt. For some very few examples a very ...


7

Your scepticism is well-founded. Putin is engaging in propaganda, trying to make Stalin's USSR seem like a state with moral superiority over Truman's USA. We can't know what Stalin would have done, but some things can be deduced. If he had a lot of atomic bombs, he might have used some on Germany. If he had only a few, he would have wanted to keep them as a ...


7

Under the terms of the Enabling Act of 1933 the Reichstag on March 31, 1933, passed the First Gleichschaltung [Synchronization] Law which: [D]issolved the diets of all Länder (except the recently elected Prussian parliament, which the Nazis already controlled); [O]rdered the state diets reconstituted on the basis of the votes in the last Reichstag election ...


6

Yes, but probably not as portrayed Did they communicate with Allied ships? Yes. Taunt them? Maybe, but it's not documented as far as I know. During both World Wars, Germany observed, intermittently, the "Prize Rules," which governed attacks on merchant (not military) ships. While the Prize Rules were in effect, submarines were required to ...


6

War is sweet to those who have never experienced it (Pindar, fifth century BC) Pacifism was pretty strong in arts and literature. Which should not be surprising given that this is the period just after WWI. Proponents were e.g. Carl von Ossietzky, Kurt Tucholsky, or Erich Maria Remarque. In the arts, there were e.g. Otto Dix, Hans Grundig, or Ernst Barlach. ...


5

Two parts for the answer: Sneak attack at the beginning of the war: Pearl Harbour was the biggest sneak attack of the Japanese plan. Smaller sneak attacks included raids on Philippinese airfields. June, 22nd 1941 was a very big sneak attack over all the German-Russian front. The Luftwaffe had so much to do against Soviet air and land based assets for the ...


5

Consider what they did destroy. It was the Nazi policy to destroy infrastructure on their retreat, a scorched earth policy. They tried to destroy transportation, and did not completely manage that. A military commander who has the manpower to blow one more bridge or the municipal birth records instead would probably go after the bridge. Of course post-war ...


5

The original Operation Valkyrie plan was developed in December 1941. Unternehmen Walküre (translated) ... Soldiers of the reserve army were supposed to occupy important points in Berlin and other larger cities and take action against insurgents. The activation by the code word 'Valkyrie' was reserved for Adolf Hitler personally and for the commander of the ...


5

Analysis at the level of personal narratives will be counter productive. Both systems combined "industrial" and "punitive" (punishment) systems. Both industrial systems followed an internal logic of productivity, to the point of literally paying their prisoners, wether in subsistence, kind or coin. Both systems did not know a method of ...


5

There were collaborators in all the countries occupied by the Germans, but in some they were more conspicuous than others. You have mentioned the situation in Yugoslavia. In the Ukraine the mainly Catholic, traditionally pro-European population in Western Ukraine collaborated to a large extent with the Nazis, as far as actively participating in the murder of ...


4

It looks ike the title of the question is less the focus than the body part for answering a question about: Q perhaps there were other, slightly lower-ranking Austrian-born Nazis who nonetheless wielded some appreciable degree of political power. Since Austria had its own nazi-party since 1903, called NDSAP (1918–1926), and a string of related predecessor ...


4

@nvoigt already did so, but I wanted to emphasise that an invasion is an act of violence. Further, though we don't need any more evidence, the OP themselves quoted incidents where the German invaders acted against Austrians (their religious preference had nothing to do with whether they were Austrians) with ill intent: March 11, 1938 On March 11–13, 1938, ...


4

First: Is propaganda on either side a strong force for these numbers? Yes, the table of causalties for Kursk is strictly debated because there was a lot of propaganda involved. On the Soviet side: Contrary to Stalingrad for example, where a Soviet dead soldier could be given as a "victim" of Nazi's cruelty, defending civilians in a besieged city, ...


4

Heidelberg, Germany was indeed spared for the reason cited above that it was already selected as the future headquarters of the US Army. The reason being that the US Army needed a site with working infrastructure. However, a key reason for it being selected was that it did not have any heavy industry or else the priorities of ending the war would have had ...


4

It is hard to fathom nowadays with decades-long "jobs for the boys" projects like the F35, but weapon making, especially in wartime, can be greatly accelerated and benefit from skunk projects carried out by small teams. (note however that the inherent difference in complexity between a major weapon system - a fighter or tank - circa 1940 and 2020 ...


3

Retreats are rarely well organized WW2, especially on the Eastern front, was mostly characterized by large all-encompassing offensives that moved front lines for hundreds of kilometers. Between those offensives front could be static for months and even years, like near Leningrad. Anyway, well organized retreats were rare. One example of well organized German ...


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