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2

Retreats are rarely well organized WW2, especially on the Eastern front, was mostly characterized by large all-encompassing offensives that moved front lines for hundreds of kilometers. Between those offensives front could be static for months and even years, like near Leningrad. Anyway, well organized retreats were rare. One example of well organized German ...


8

I have tracked down the Dahl quote from Going Solo: We had nine Hurricanes at Haifa and the same number of pilots, and in the days that followed we were kept very busy. Our main job was to protect the navy ... every day they would sail up the coast past Tyre and Sidon to bombard the Vichy French forces in the mountains around the Damour river. And whenever ...


5

Consider what they did destroy. It was the Nazi policy to destroy infrastructure on their retreat, a scorched earth policy. They tried to destroy transportation, and did not completely manage that. A military commander who has the manpower to blow one more bridge or the municipal birth records instead would probably go after the bridge. Of course post-war ...


9

This is only partial and rather speculative answer, but it is a bit too long for comment. A short historical overview of the Latvian State History Archive (LSHA) is found (in Latvian) on its webpage, which was linked in my original comment: http://www.latvijasarhivi.lv/index.php?&115 Note that while it is called "state history archive" it has ...


2

Germany had very tough gun laws after WWI, which were gradually relaxed during the Weimar Republic and the Nazi regime. I'll paraphrase German Wikipedia: Immediately after WWI, private gun ownership was outlawed, however this was impossible to enforce because guns were not registered. Especially post Freikorps right wing militias (Schwarze Reichswehr) were ...


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Admiral Kuznetsov's finest hour June 1941 was a hectic month in Moscow. More and more reports from agents, spies, military attachés, aerial and other reconnaissance, were confirming the fact that Germany prepares for an attack on the USSR in the coming days. Much was written about Stalin's indecisiveness in those days, as he was getting more and more aware ...


3

After reviewing the actual treaty texts, I eventually have decided that no, France was not in violation of the main naval treaties. This is despite the various blurbs from Wikipedia that I pointed out in the comments. How so? Well, let’s go through the situation and treaties and pull some threads in a linear fashion. The Washington Naval Treaty (copy at the ...


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