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The basic problem here is that scientific study of cultures (Sociology, Anthropology, etc.) is a relatively new discipline. There are indigenous social scientists today of course (my little sister is one of them), but by the 20th Century a lot of the original beliefs had been lost and a new hybrid culture developed (a process she calls colonial entanglement)....


30

SHORT ANSWER "Total War" is a bit grandiose and ambitious, but as far as I know very few Native American or American Indian groups in the USA had any sort of rules against harming noncombatants in war. LONG ANSWER As far as I know, as a general rule Native Americans or American Indians in the USA didn't have any sort of social rules against killing ...


17

There are several theories of disappearance of the Dorset people. Two are discussed in the article "Disappearance of Dorset Culture" published on the webpage of the Canadian Museum of History: Climate change. The disappearance of Dorset people coincides with the period of the Medieval Warm Period: In the centuries around A.D. 1000, the Arctic ...


14

Its exceedingly unlikely. There's no feasible route to the Americas at their level of technology that doesn't go through the Beringa (NE Sibera/Alaska) area. The period in question covers an unusually long interglacial, but there was a colder period in there where the land bridge would probably have been available (around 225,000 years ago) However, it is ...


6

There's a bit of a false premise here, in that there were Native American empires. I suspect you meant why weren't there any north of Mexico, as there is no way you could overlook the Inca, Aztec, Maya, Olmec, Zapotec, etc etc, and my answer is built around that premise. Life in America is Hard When the Europeans first came to America, they had trouble ...


5

From the evidence below, failing very strong evidence that it was routine for merchant European slave traders to hunt down slaves themselves along the Slave Coast, the percentage of slaves delivered to the New World that were purchased from black slavers must be very close to 100%. There is simply no business model, consistent with the slave trade as we ...


5

Not sure what the rules are about this, but I had this post from AskHistorians bookmarked. Written by u/Ahhuatl This is really a question better suited for r/AskAnthropology, as strictly speaking the field of history doesn't concern itself with cross-cultural comparisons of social evolution. Nevertheless, I'll put on my anthropologist hat and ...


3

Is there a time in US history when bicycle ridership was more prevalent than now? I haven't tried very hard to dig up hard data, but based on general trends, I suspect probably not. The Wikipedia article on "bike booms" is illuminating here. The 1890s was the first major wave of popularity for bicylcing, but at that it was almost exclusively done for ...


2

By some accounts, oils and furs were traded in the Pacific Northwest. Early accounts stress the enormous importance of oils in trade, feasting, and food. The Makah used to compete to see who could drink the most whale oil at feasts (Colson 1953). People were desperate for oils. Suffice it to say that “ooligan” is derived from a Tsimshian word ...


2

An area which may require a closer look is the southwestern cultures. Trade routes were actually quite well established in these regions, with many items being traded. An article Indigenous Trade: The Southwest , lists many of these trade materials(emphasis highlighting trade materials mine): Anasazi. Around the end of the first millennium a.d., Anasazi ...


2

Too much land. The population density in South and Central America (about 6 million for the Aztecs) was much higher than in most of North America (500,000 for all of Canada). Having too little population means that people within the society are unable to specialize, and trade becomes harder to conduct for less gains. The copper that was used in Greece ...


2

In general, each colony had an official, established church which did its best to impose a religious monopoly. In the article "Religious Deregulation: Origins and Consequences", Roger Finke argues: Politicians and preachers alike considered the idea of religious freedom, or even religious toleration, a dangerous and heathen notion that was sure to ...


1

It’s really fascinating. These colonies all got chartered at different times. The charters generally reflected the state of affairs back in England. But England was in general state of religious turmoil. The first successful colonies were during James I (1612). He was a moderate Anglican dealing with radical Calvinists and Catholics who tried to kill him. ...


1

I recommend you read Guns, Germs and Steel form Jared Diamond. It's not 100% accurate, and there is some controversy over it, but it gives you a good idea why some people got a better hand in life than others. Why, in over 10,000 years of occupying North America did they never advance from a tribal culture and form a single united country Some tribes did ...


1

In addition to the answers above, another reason for this difference in advancement could be climate. An event called the Little Ice Age happened from 1300 onwards, leading to food shortages in many Native American cities in North America and hampered their ability to create larger urban centers and harness agricultural advances that help with the ...


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