84

Because no one in their right minds would think Britain should use a weapon of mass destruction on Argentina over the Falklands, what with its 1600 population. Even then the well documented concept of a nuclear taboo was in effect. No one regarded nuclear bombs as normal bombs, and therefore no one wanted to use it so casually. The Falkland Islands were not, ...


84

Why were there no nuclear detonations in 1959? The reason there were no tests in 1959 was that the Soviet Union, Great Britain, and the United States agreed to a moratorium on nuclear weapon tests in 1958. This moratorium lasted from November 1958 to August 1961. The Soviet Union resumed on 1 September, 1961, with the US following suit a couple of weeks ...


76

The official designation for that particular device was the RDS-220. The nickname Tsar Bomba was an appellation applied by the West, rather than the designers of the bomb (who - according to the site linked above - apparently referred to it as Big Ivan, or simply the Big Bomb). According to the information on nuclearweaponarchive.org, The nickname Tsar ...


73

There is a 1946 book by John Hersey, Hiroshima, which is an excellent compilation of personal testimonies from Hiroshima residents following the atomic bombing. Although it doesn’t mention Allied leafleting specifically, there’s a few important things it indicates about civilian perceptions of the threat at the time, namely It was abundantly clear to ...


56

It was Project Chariot, in Alaska. A good book about it is the Firecracker Boys, I recommend you read it if you are interested in the subject. I think it was cancelled because conservationists and Alaska Natives brought it to the attention of the general public, and it would have been a disaster. The proponents were perfectly willing to try it (they had ...


47

The US did not resort to using nuclear weapons in Vietnam for a variety of reasons: fear of the damage it would cause to the US's international reputation, domestic political considerations, a reluctance to break the 'tradition' of non-use, and a realization that, although there were plenty of viable targets such as airfields, ports and supply lines, only ...


45

In Russian Language the word "Tsar" has also another, non-literal meaning. Examples are: "Tsar-pushka" (king of the guns), the largest (in caliber) existing gun, and "Tsar-kolokol" (king of the bells), the largest bell in the world. Both the gun and the bell are currently in the publicly accessible part of the Kremlin, (and were there during the last two ...


44

If the bomb failed to explode in any way (which was unlikely, see comments and Mark's answer), the USA still would not have to worry about it (too much). They would win the war anyway within a few months, and pick up the wrecked bomb from wherever the Japanese had stored it. Even if Japan could figure out what that bomb was supposed to be doing and repair ...


43

Hiroshima, the first city, was "an important army depot and port of embarkation in the middle of an urban industrial area. It is a good radar target and it is such a size that a large part of the city could be extensively damaged. There are adjacent hills which are likely to produce a focussing[sic] effect which would considerably increase the blast damage. ...


43

The primary contingency plan was the design of the bomb itself. Little Boy was not a safe design: any number of unplanned events could cause a detonation. Foremost among these is impact: a 500 g impact, such as would happen after a 15,000-foot (4.5 km) fall, is sufficient to bring the bullet and target together, detonating the bomb. If the bomb hit water ...


39

During the Cold War, there were always doubts if extended deterrence would hold. Would the US put Washington at risk to defend or avenge Bonn or Frankfurt? So NATO needed powerful signals that they would stand together, even at the expense of operational efficiency. Compare the multinational battalions in the Baltics today -- those cannot stop a Russian ...


38

There was discussion of options. The "gadget" was an atomic bomb. From the minutes of the Target Committee for 10 May 1945: Gadget Jettisoning and Landing A. It was agreed that if the aircraft has to return to its base with the gadget and if it is in good condition when it has reached there, it should make a normal landing with the greatest ...


37

The discovery of uranium fission by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann (German chemists) in the Jan 1939 issue of Die Naturwissenschaften (The Science of Nature) sparked great interest among physicists all around the world. Jewish Hungarian born physicist Leó Szilárd was among them. Szilárd living in the US at the time, realized the importance of neutron-driven ...


34

The driving force behind the Manhattan Project was less about using an atomic bomb and more about getting one before the Germans did. It was known the Germans had their own atomic bomb project and prominent physicists, including Einstein, warned the US government about the possibility of such a bomb. This was the driving force behind the Manhattan Project: ...


33

The U.S. likely did not target Tokyo for the atomic bomb strikes as it was the seat of the Emperor and the location of much of the high ranking military officers. These are precisely the people you do not want to kill if you want to negotiate a surrender, as they are the people you would be negotiating with. The U.S. decided to drop the bombs onto military ...


33

On page 14 of FAS.org it indicates his salary was initially set at $10,000. Since that exceeded his previous UC professor’s salary he asked that it be reduced in line with others. Apparently the Regents turned down his request (following letter on that page). As a comparison, on page 10 there is a salary listing for "Persons not now holding an academic ...


32

Little Boy detonated at ~580 metres above Hiroshima, and Fat Man at ~500 metres above Nagasaki. While all nuclear explosions generate electromagnetic pulses of some sort, at these low altitudes their strength rapidly diminishes with distance, giving them a rather limited area of effect. The effects of EMP from a surface or low-altitude nuclear burst will ...


28

Not Canada, but Alaska. In 1958 "Project Chariot" was the idea to use several nuclear explosions to build a harbour at Cape Thompson, Alaska. It was part of a series of ideas to use nuclear explosions for non-military, commercial purposes. The series was called "Operation Plowshare". Wikipedia: Project Chariot Operation Plowshare


28

By the time of the Vietnam war, the US nuclear weapons policies had changed radically from the mid-1950s (when nuclear weapons were seen as the logical option for ALL conflicts), and were considered viable only as a last resort and as retaliatory weapons in case an enemy would use them (or other weapons of mass destruction) first against the USA or a NATO ...


28

In regards initiating the Manhattan Project, Einstein and Szilard were clearly critical. Without them the entire project would, at a minimum, undoubtedly have started significantly later in the war. Szilard was the first in the U.S. to recognize the potential of an atomic bomb, and Einstein's celebrity, both in signing the letter and subsequently leveraging ...


28

The USA could be confident that the USSR would learn about the hydrogen bomb test from atmospheric sampling. It's possible to detect extremely low levels of radioactive isotopes in the atmosphere, some of which are characteristic of nuclear explosions. Doing this sampling has given important clues to some countries' nuclear weapons development programs, so ...


26

About the Yasukuni Shrine part of the question, since no one has addressed that: It is important to remember the nature of that establishment. The Yasukuni Shrine houses over 2.4 million of Japan's war dead, only 0.043% of whom (1,068) are convicted of any war crimes. They weren't even all members of the Japanese military. Those commemorated at the shrine ...


26

I think we may be operating from a misconception, that the diary entry concerning that the 'target will be a purely military one' and that the statement that 'Hiroshima, a military base' imply Truman did not understand the presence of a city. The target selection process had been going on for some time. A lot of documents are available and the discussion ...


25

This question has been debated for a very long time, and I've never seen a conclusive answer one way or the other. I don't believe there is a single reason Japan surrendered. Rather there was a long series of defeats leading to a war they could not win. Two major blows hammered the point home and a year of even greater insanity (the invasion of Japan) was ...


23

This is not possible. And this has nothing to do with the actual brightness of explosion. A similar explosion on the Moon will probably be visible from the earth if the weather conditions are good and if you know when and where to look. According to the Wikipedia, the Nagasaki bomb was exploded at the height of 503 m, about 1/2 km. To be directly visible ...


22

From the notes of the first Target Committee meeting (spring 1945) Tokyo is a possibility but it is now practically all bombed and burned out and is practically rubble with only the palace grounds left standing. Consideration is only possible here. The same was true of most Japanese cities. From The making of the atomic bomb. The committee had refined ...


21

A team of researchers at the Institute for International Studies at Stanford University compiled the "Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft, and Orphan Radiation Sources" (DSTO) in 2002. At the time, that database was described as the: "... most reliable currently available data on illicit trafficking of weapons-usable nuclear material" Lyudmila Zaitseva ...


19

At that time, the US was concerned that a repeat of the Korean war could happen, with China sending in masses of troops... North Vietnam shares a border with China, just like North Korea. China wasn't overly fond of N Korea or Vietnam (in both cases, the initial supporter was the Soviet Union, not China), but when UN forces got near the Chinese border in N ...


19

The project that Scott Manley is referring to was known as Project A119, and was run at the Armour Research Foundation (ARF), which was based at the Illinois Institute of Technology. The ARF is now known as the IIT Research Institute. The official title of Project A119 was A Study of Lunar Research Flights, and Volume 1 of the report, produced in 1959 by ...


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