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56 votes
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Has there ever been an instance of an active nuclear power plant within or near a war zone?

The Ten-Day War, in 1990, was Slovenia's war of independence from Yugoslavia. During this war, at least a few battles took places within 10-20 km of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant, which had been ...
Michael Seifert's user avatar
54 votes

Has there ever been an instance of an active nuclear power plant within or near a war zone?

Best example I know of is the Zhaporizhia Nuclear Power Plant. Its in Southern Ukraine, which unfortunately put it right within the area that the Russians "separatist rebel forces" wanted to use to ...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
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51 votes

How and when did the word "nuclear" replace the word "atomic"?

At least regarding when, we can see with Google Books Ngrams. First let's look at "atomic energy" vs. "nuclear energy": In the 1940s, both terms were in use, but "atomic ...
Brian Z's user avatar
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32 votes

What were the EMP effects, if any, of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

Little Boy detonated at ~580 metres above Hiroshima, and Fat Man at ~500 metres above Nagasaki. While all nuclear explosions generate electromagnetic pulses of some sort, at these low altitudes their ...
Semaphore's user avatar
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29 votes

How important were Einstein and Szilard and other scientists to the creation and ultimate success of the Manhattan Project?

In regards initiating the Manhattan Project, Einstein and Szilard were clearly critical. Without them the entire project would, at a minimum, undoubtedly have started significantly later in the war. ...
Pieter Geerkens's user avatar
25 votes

What benefits were there to the USA of developing both Uranium and Plutonium bombs in World War 2?

To simply say that they wanted to try out different types is to miss the point that weapons-grade uranium and plutonium have fundamentally different production methods and lend themselves to very ...
Patrick N's user avatar
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19 votes
Accepted

Where was Carl Sagan working on a plan to detonate a nuke on the Moon? Where was he applying when he leaked it?

The project that Scott Manley is referring to was known as Project A119, and was run at the Armour Research Foundation (ARF), which was based at the Illinois Institute of Technology. The ARF is now ...
sempaiscuba's user avatar
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19 votes

Has there ever been an instance of an active nuclear power plant within or near a war zone?

In 1981, Israel intentionally destroyed an Osiris-class research reactor. Basically, they flew in, bombed it to pieces, then flew away. While this was a just a sneak attack and not a part of ...
Astor Florida's user avatar
17 votes

Is there any footage of the Chernobyl explosion?

IIRC the station operators weren't sure what happened initially because they had no cameras looking at the reactor. The first sign of how bad the explosion had been, was someone opening a door and ...
Hobbes's user avatar
  • 481
16 votes

Has there ever been an instance of an active nuclear power plant within or near a war zone?

Dimona Nuclear Research center is not a commercial power plant but it is 50 miles from the border with Gaza, which is a permanent war zone.
Alex's user avatar
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15 votes

What were the EMP effects, if any, of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

My understanding is that the Electromagnetic Pulse induced by a nuclear weapon is mainly due to the ionizing effect of the gamma rays released by the nuclear reaction. However, for this ionizing ...
Olivier's user avatar
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14 votes

What were the EMP effects, if any, of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

The existing answers do a good job of explaining why the EMP effect radius was not as large, but there's another important aspect we need to consider: We're talking about 1945. EMPs do affect ...
reirab's user avatar
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12 votes

Is there any footage of the Chernobyl explosion?

I'm also aware that back in 1986 not everyone was walking around with a camera in their pocket. Are you really? It goes a bit further than that, my friend. Of course lots of people did carry ...
Jos's user avatar
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9 votes

What benefits were there to the USA of developing both Uranium and Plutonium bombs in World War 2?

Wikipedia answers this rather well. Basically, a plutonium bomb is more complicated than a uranium bomb. However, weapon-grade plutonium is also easier to obtain than weapon-grade uranium, since the ...
andejons's user avatar
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8 votes

Did people on the Bridge of Death in Pripyat actually die?

The BBC's More or Less podcast discussed this, and interviewed Professor Jim Smith of Portsmouth University. He pointed out that Pripyat was fortunately not directly downwind of the disaster, and that ...
IMSoP's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

Why was Hanford, Washington, selected during World War II as the site of America’s first nuclear energy plant?

A vast, isolated area was needed to produce plutonium because no one knew for sure how much damage the radiation it gave off might do. Abundant power for plutonium production and water to cool the ...
George A. Solodun's user avatar
7 votes

Did the United States have a third atomic bomb to drop on Japan?

A third bomb was in production, though it wouldn't have been ready until after the 15th. Truman specifically rescinded authorization for atomic bomb release prior to the 15th, though. On August 10, ...
De Novo's user avatar
  • 251
5 votes

What benefits were there to the USA of developing both Uranium and Plutonium bombs in World War 2?

Nuclear bomb making was a new endeavor and it was not clear which approach would be successful - cheaper, faster, more powerful, smaller, more reliable &c &c. They really had to try all ...
sds's user avatar
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5 votes

Plans for More Nuclear Warfare in Japan during WW2

Professor Alex Wellerstein examined this question on "Restricted Data: The Nuclear Secrecy Blog" in a post titled "The Third Shot and Beyond" (April 25, 2012). He presented evidence that the U.S. ...
Literalman's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Did US and Soviet nuclear war policies allow for a pause?

Such points indeed existed, which is one of the reasons both sides always hung on to long range bombers even though ICBMs and SLBMs would be much more rapid to reach their targets. Bombers would ...
jwenting's user avatar
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5 votes

How much support did America give to the scientists working on the Manhattan Project?

A good reference is The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes. Note that America (the government) initiated the Manhattan Project to develop the bomb and, as one aspect, recruited the necessary ...
Barry's user avatar
  • 1,475
4 votes

Why did the USA ever test nukes on their own soil?

Perhaps you are not familiar with the US West? Even today (and more so in the 1940s & 50s) there are places where you can be miles and miles (substitute km if desired) away from anything much ...
jamesqf's user avatar
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4 votes

Is there any footage of the Chernobyl explosion?

This is so unlikely, I think its fair to even discount the possibility unless you hear otherwise. Even in the USA in 1986 consumer video recording devices were a new luxury, and recording media had ...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
  • 117k
3 votes

Why were all Y-12 operators of Manhattan Project women?

Q Why were all Y-12 operators of Manhattan Project women? I have searched a while and I have not found any evidence of why all operators at Y-12 had to be women. A quite likely explanation for this ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
  • 80.6k
2 votes

What benefits were there to the USA of developing both Uranium and Plutonium bombs in World War 2?

The uranium-based gun design was the fundamental approach of the project from the beginning. The "fat man" design used plutonium-239, a substance much easier to produce than uranium-235, but ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 37.7k
2 votes

When was General Douglas MacArthur made aware of the Manhattan Project?

MacArthur's defense of the Philippines on Dec 7 was terrible. Unlike Pearl Harbor, which was thought to be un-attackable at that time (until the IJN showed what could be done with carrier forces), ...
tj1000's user avatar
  • 3,451
1 vote

How and when did the word "nuclear" replace the word "atomic"?

There are still quite a lot of uses of "atomic" in this kind of context floating around, particular in organisation names. For eaxmple, in the UK, the Atomic Weapons Establishment is ...
Chris Cooper's user avatar
1 vote

Why did the Germans fall behind the Americans in the development of the atomic bomb after an initial lead?

There is a relevant new publication on the topic: Popp (2016) "Misinterpreted Documents and Ignored Physical Facts: The History of ‘Hitler's Atomic Bomb’ needs to be corrected" "It is shown that ...
asmaier's user avatar
  • 611
1 vote

What do the modern Japanese people think about the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

I am an american of Japanese descent. My grandmother is from okinawa and my father was born in Japan in '62. I would have to say that I hold no resentment, but at the same time I am ashamed as a US ...
josh's user avatar
  • 21

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