21

The inscriptions are (note that the S's are backwards): Obverse (bear) - MONETA BERNENSIS (coinage of Bern) Reverse (cross) - SANCTVS VINCENCIVS (Saint Vincent) (The style of lettering can be compared, with, for example, a 14th-century brooch shown here on page 2, also with reversed S's and closed-up E's; with a 1497 inscription showing A's with the same ...


11

On British coinage: The title Fidei Defensor abbreviated to F.D. (Defender of the Faith) occurs for the first time on the British coinage under George I. The earliest example is from the very beginning of his reign, in 1714. "1 Guinea - George I 1st portrait". Source: Numista The inscription appears frequently on coins from here on. For example, ...


4

After a good amount of research I am pretty confident this coin is not real. It is made to look like a coin minted between 1000 and 1300, possibly by King William the Conquerer or maybe William Rufus, its imitating a silver penny hence the legible part of the script that says PILEM R?E?(X) but all legit coins would have two L's. If it is PILEMEL as ...


4

This is a Kroton drachma (by the size, they also made a nomos but it was 3x bigger) This is also a fake, very easy to tell by the strange edging and the fact the obverse and the reverse are the exact same, just an inverse of the other. i would guess these were cast using a single side to create both sides of the coin. see: https://en.numista.com/catalogue/...


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