40

Yes, Eastern Orthodox missionaries preached their version of the Gospel to outsiders in a manner not very different to Protestants and Catholics. Russian missionaries preached Orthodoxy to Alaskan natives in the 1700's (Alaska was by then a territory of the Russian Empire), converting some. Also see here. One famous Russian missionary is St. Innocent of ...


12

The impact was mostly limited, despite the efforts of Patriarch Cyril Lucaris (died 1638) to bring the Orthodox church and the protestant churches together. There was also some proselytizing which went both ways at various times, but this also the case with the Catholic church. In areas under Ottoman control, the Orthodox church was understandably far more ...


10

Yes, sending out Orthodox missionaries was quite common, at least in the more distant past. When the Byzantine Empire was still a thing in the Middle Ages, missionaries were commonly sent to the pagans in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. The Slavs in particular were common recipients of missionaries. The missionaries at the time commonly pursued a top-...


4

I don't have a source for this, but what I heard from others is that the methods are different. Orthodox missions consist of some clergy showing up, building a church, and starting to do services, and waiting for people to start showing up. They will just go ahead and translate the service into the local language, inventing an alphabet if necessary, and ...


3

Much more recently than the other answers: http://www.hchc.edu/missions/articles/articles/orthodox-mission-in-tropical-africa documents Greek Orthodox missionary activity undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa by the Patriarchate of Alexandria; It is pretty much 20th century. The bishoprics of Africa are listed under https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


2

Short Answer. I can't say whether any of the votes for Michael Romanov had anything to do with his "Roman" surname. Long Answer: I do have some comments on the Third Rome ideologies of Russia and other states. And I have a suggestion for how the Romanov family could have claimed to be descended from Roman Emperors, though as far as I know the Romanovs ...


1

Probably not. Michael Romanov accepted the throne reluctantly (at age 16), and mainly out of a sense of duty to family members who had been abused by the previous Tsar, Boris Gudunov. The Third Rome issue was much more in vogue around the turn of the 15th and 16th centuries. This was used to support the claim to the Russian throne of Ivan III, who had ...


1

Very unlikely. The Russian orthodox Church became autocephalous in 1448, half a decade before Constantinople fell (though such was clearly imminent). Throughout the Middle Ages the true heir of the Roman Empire was seen to be the various Christian Catholic Patriarchies, of Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. It was as natural for the ...


1

The early centers of Christianity, that is Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem, all sided with the Eastern (Greek Orthodox) Church. Rome did not recognize the position of these cities (except in a subordinate role) and the Orthodox Church did. Rome was the last of the five major cities to become Christian. It was, however, the most powerful, first because it ...


1

According to Russian church records, four others held office before 1800: Ignatij Smola held office September 8 - October 1, 1721 Innokrntij (Nerunovich) held office November 25, 1732 - July 26, 1747. Sophonij (Kristalevsky) held office April 18, 1753 - March 30, 1771 Michael (Mitkevich) held office August 2, 1772 - August 1, 1789 Benjamin (Bagranskij)...


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