16

I also believe the answer is "no". It sure is tempting to put forth one's own theories here, but I'm unaware of any one that is generally accepted. I will point out one thing though: That chart you posted is essentially a chart of literacy. If you use the dates there, you are asking a question about the discovery of writing in various places, not the "...


11

There are lots of dogs in paleolithic cave paintings. For example: Dogs can be used for hunting in the woods, like deer, but for hunting large herds in open areas like bison, they are not useful and are more of a nuisance than an aid. (Notice that in the above image the quarry is a deer, not an accident.) A recent journal article on the subject: New ...


9

From a technical taxonomical point of view, it is impossible to have domestic dogs depicted in a Paleolithic cave painting, simply because domestication of plants and animals is one of the features of the Neolithic. So by definition, any art that depicts a canid is either Neolithic, or it is showing a wild relative such as a wolf. Now this is a bit overly ...


5

Yes, current archaeological evidence does suggest that humans were hunting with dogs in the Palaeolithic period, well before they developed agriculture. There is now good evidence from both archaeology and DNA analysis that dogs were domesticated well before the end of the last Ice Age (at least 11,500 BCE). Excavations at the Mesolithic site of Star Carr ...


5

Archaeologists may well have discovered very old signs of roped animals, but I do not think history is capable of pinpointing the exact moment it began. For one thing, the Stone Age is not exactly known for its record keeping. That said, there exists 8,000 year old rock arts of giraffes with a leash. If this was an representation of domestication (...


4

Actually, the truth is that - in absolute terms - we don't know the size of the groups. All that we are able to say is that the material culture of a particular group - as revealed by archaeology - suggests that the size of a given group may be larger or smaller than some other group. Occasionally we have group burials from a site like the Maszycka Cave, ...


4

Our closest genetic relative, the chimpanzees, have been observed to fashion themselves tools. That link even has a video showing one doing it, if you are interested in the process. So most likely this is a behavior that was shared by our common ape ancestor over 7 million years ago. The only real tool innovation early man initially brought to the table (or ...


3

First of all let me say that this is an excellent and well researched question. A quick recap from Wikipedia is handy: Outside the mainland of Afro-Eurasia, [...] megafaunal extinctions followed a distinctive landmass-by-landmass pattern that closely parallels the spread of humans into previously uninhabited regions of the world, and which shows no ...


3

No, this interpretation is misleading. Let's say that you analyze the ancient level of inheritance where you had one hundred grand-grand-parents. Using mitochondrial DNA you can only research only one of these 100 grand-grand-parents, the single grand-grand-mother that is in the most maternal position in the tree. In other words only mother-of-mother-of-...


2

This paper in Nature is fascinating - unfortunately, the chemical studies described were not performed on ancient East Asians, but it lines up with archaeological and anthropological evidence worldwide. There have only been two studies of Palaeolithic modern humans, Homo sapiens sapiens. A study of the isotope values of humans from the late Upper ...


2

You can read the original paper here: Older age becomes common late in human evolution. Note the author's first conclusion is that their results indicate: a trend of increased survivorship of older adults through human evolution. Now, the increase in longevity is by far the greatest in the early modern humans of the Upper Palaeolithic. At this point ...


1

We have a great deal of evidence showing that dogs lived alongside humans very far into the prehistoric past. There are burial sites with dogs buried alongside humans dating back to long before the beginning of agriculture. However, there is little evidence to support the idea that dogs were originally domesticated in order to help with hunting. This is the ...


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