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46

There is no evidence they seriously considered expelling all Palestinians. The impracticality, illegality and negative publicity was self-evident, even if fringe elements entertained the fantasy. However, there's evidence that smaller scale displacements were carried out. It resulted in the 1967 exodus. During the brief war of 1967, 350,000 Palestinians ...


29

Decided to do some research to try to provide an answer to this question. I found three documented cases where an Arab leader used the term "Drive Jews into the sea" or talked about large scale massacre. I also mention a court case that seems to indicate that Nasser never used that term himself, nor did any other Arab leader make genocidal statements prior ...


29

In 1948, the Arabs attacked first. A few hours after Israel became an independent country, most of the Arab countries of the region invaded. But that's just the 1948 answer. Local Arab and Jewish militia forces had been clashing for years. A few months earlier (in 1947) bombings and shootings had increased to the level of a civil war. Jews were being ...


26

To give a little more depth from what TED notes, this did take shape over time and was based on Zionism and how it was being viewed by the British at the time. There were also competing interests that eventually collided as time wen on. When the Ottoman empire entered on the side of the Germany this prompted Britain, France and Russia to partition the ...


25

The Jews were largely exiled from 'Judea' which Romans then renamed 'Palestina' in 132CE by the Romans, after a rebellion against Roman rule. They dispersed into the Roman Empire, and gradually spread to all parts of the world. 1800 years later, there were quite a lot of them in Germany, but it's very unlikely that many, if any, had moved as individuals all ...


23

What Arab plans can be inferred from three classes of sources: (1) Pre-war statements to the Arab population with promises that all would share in the booty of Jewish property won by the Arab Legion armies, (2) changes in Ottoman land ownership laws following Jordan's annexation of the West Bank and East Jerusalem Here are some statements from Arab books and ...


23

I'm not aware of any evidence that Israel considered mass expulsions from occupied territories in the aftermath of the 1967 Six Day War. As I understand it, the civilian populations would have been protected under the terms of the Fourth Geneva Convention. In particular, Article 49 of the Convention states that: "Individual or mass forcible transfers, as ...


22

The ban occurred during Mamluk period. The specifics of why are unclear in the wiki entry but the Jewish Virtual Library helpfully suggests that it's because they turned the location into a Mosque. Assuming that this was the correct sequence of events and that the ban went into effect around then, two names appear in the Al-Jawali Mosque's wiki entry: Al-...


18

In 1974 the PLO adopted what is called "The Ten Point Program". It is a program that outlines a phased plan for liberating all of Palestine. Liberating here means liberating it from Israeli rule. Obviously once all of Palestine has been liberated that means there is no Israel at all. If we take this at face value, that means that any compromise you make ...


18

During the last one hundred fifty years or so, the concept of Zionism, the desire of the Jews to run their own state in their historical biblical territory, become prevalent. Theoretically such a state would be free from the periodic persecutions Jews have suffered since the diaspora while living in other people's countries. This resulted in a large number ...


15

According to the graph on the World Population wiki page, global population at 1000 BC was about 50 million. The vast majority of that would have been in the areas of intensive farming, which at that time means Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, and perhaps the Indus valley. So that number doesn't seem completely out of line. However, Israel is much more marginal ...


14

Summary Nothing is known beyond the official drive the Jews into the Sea rhetoric, and nothing definitive will probably be known. Nothing is Known Most countries do not publish their unfulfilled plans, and, even when they do, there is no good way to ascertain their authenticity. This is especially true for the Arab states in question, which were at the ...


14

Wikipedia - Siege of Jerusalem All of the contemporary records, whether Hebrew or otherwise, rely on regnal dating systems. There are two points of confusion, particularly when dating the reigns of Israelite or Jewish kings: which calendar is used and when does the first year start. I'll try to clarify farther down using Queen Elizabeth II as an example. ...


12

Not everybody living in Israel at that time was Jewish. The country had been mostly ruled by Greeks since 333 BC, and then by Romans since the mid first century BC. As this was quite recent, this resulted in a real polyglot mix of people, with Greeks performing much of the upper-class administration duties, while the soldiers were Roman. It is generally ...


12

Question: When Israel won the six day war did they consider expelling all Arabs from the annexed territory? Did Israel consider doing this and if so, would that have been in violation of international law? Short Answer: Yes the expulsion of all Arabs from the occupied territories was considered at a cabinet meeting by the Israeli Prime Minister. ...


12

Copies of the letter to the New York Times, dated 2 December 1948 are easy enough to find online. It is worth noting that Einstein was not the only signatory to the letter, although his is naturally the name that commentators choose to quote. The paragraph quoted by Lustig itself contains part of the answer to your question: Among the most disturbing ...


11

Actually the problem is that somebody with a contrived mind in 1947 decided that instead of creating one state of Israel, there should be two new states: one for Jews and another for Arabs. This plan did not account for the fact that there were already 21 Arab state of which 2 bordered the territory of the "Palestinian Arab state" that was to be created. ...


11

It's hard to answer this ("What was Palestine before, if not a country") in a format that's not encyclopaedic, but I'll try some snippets: No there was never a country/nation called a "Palestine". More specifically about the name: it was a name given by Roman Empire to the territory they occupied and conquered from the Israel in the first century AD (the ...


11

In 2002, the leader of the Palestinian Authority Yasser Arafat said he would accept the Taba agreement in the terms put forward by President Bill Clinton 18 months earlier. Back in January 2001, the Taba summit had reached an impasse when both (Israeli and Palestinian) negociation teams still had reservations while Clinton had to quit the White House and ...


10

Jaffa, which has an Arab population of about 70,000, is entirely Arab except for two Jewish quarters. - United Nations Special Committee on Palestine. Report to the General Assembly. 1947. Jaffa was a predominantly Arab city with a large Arab majority. Carving Jaffa out as an Arab enclave was a land-efficient way of strengthening the proportion of ...


10

It is not clear exactly when Jews first started settling in Germany, but there is evidence of Jewish settlement in the Rhineland communities of Speyer, Worms and Mainz already by the 10th century. There are different theories as to where they had come from. The most widely held theory is that they were Palestinian. Most recently, this theory was challenged ...


10

The short answer to your question is "no". The evidence lies in some understanding of the history of the region (which I study as an Arabist) and a look at some of the linguistic aspects. It is widely known that the Levant was the terminus of the Silk Road in the west. What is typically lost on many people is that that trade often involved the vast ...


10

They did so because it was the actual general use of the term. "Palestine" was and is more a geographical designation, since Roman times, while "Israel" was and is a politically one and "Holy Land" was and is a spiritual-religious one. The Balfour declaration was a bit vague and aspirational and also focusses on defining the geographical location. ...


8

A simple google search indicates that it is probably a Government of Palestine War Loan Bearer Bond Here is an image that looks remarkably like yours. (If there are problems with that link, I may have to correct them later).


8

This question asks for an opinion. At best it asks for an estimation. Using history as a reference, we know at least about a few things concerning atomic bombs: -They do a lot of structural damage (Hiroshima and Nagasaki did, even though there are some nowadays which can damage organic tissue without destroying many buildings, but that's not history) -They ...


8

Well, the Menorah was seen later (according to one testimony): Most likely, the menorah was looted by the Vandals in the sacking of Rome in 455 CE, and taken to their capital, Carthage. The Byzantine army under General Belisarius might have removed it in 533 and brought it to Constantinople. According to Procopius, it was carried through the ...


8

Really interesting documents and facts are brought here More pictures and information here Both sources describes people leaving on their own free will as a result of a war, some of it supported by the Israeli government funds and assistance , but according to the articles nothing about active deportation. There was a plan that was partially executed to ...


7

They were cheifly worried about the resentment it was creating among the resident Arab population, and thus instability in an area they were nominally responsible for. The flip side is that the Jewish state was pretty much their idea in the first place. It seems like it didn't occur to them that it was a problem to promise the Arabs and the Jews two ...


7

Philby's plan was to relocate all Arabs from Western Palestine to other Arabic countries, excluding the Arab population of Jerusalem. The £20 million mentioned in Wikipedia was the proposed compensation the Jews would have to pay for the resettlement. Additionally the Jews would support Feisal's, Ibn Saud's son, claim to the Saudi throne over his older ...


7

Looks like you're interested in this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Palestine#The_question_of_late_Arab_immigration_to_Palestine The data to answer your question is immigration stats as exact measures of hereditary do not exist. You could always subtract net immigration from population increases to get a upper bound. (You could do some maths ...


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