30

The islands of the Philippines are quite large and close together in comparison to the Pacific islands. A battalion or regiment of Japanese soldiers left on a small island many miles from anywhere else are stuck there, and can't contribute to the war. A much larger group of Japanese soldiers on a large island can feed themselves from the island's resources....


25

As an addendum to the other excellent answer: If you owe the bank $100 that's your problem. If you owe the bank $100 million, that's the bank's problem. (attributed to Keynes and Getty). The same goes for stranded/surrounded troops: a stranded battalion is doomed, a stranded army can cause trouble. Too many troops were stranded on Philippines. A similar ...


15

As a veteran of WWII, during the invasion of the Philippines, this is my recollection. You must remember that Mac Arthur was kicked out of the Philippines by the Japanese. He left poor General Wainright there and said he would be back. WAINRIGHT suffered atrocities under the Japanese with forced marches.I can't remember if his group were forced to march in ...


15

Nimitz proposed to attack Formosa/Taiwan instead, as being a more strategically advantageous target. The goal of taking either was to cut Japan off from its source of oil (Indonesia) and other raw materials like rubber. By taking either goal, the US would fully control the sea lanes between Japan and both Indonesia and Indochina, both were primary sources ...


9

During the Spanish-American War, the United States had told the Filipinos it was fighting to free them from Spain. But after the Spanish surrender, American newspapers and politicians began a campaign to "Keep the Philippines." Businessmen saw Manila as a center for trading with the great market of China. Military officers wanted an outpost in Asia. ...


9

Prior to 1930 (1946), actually, the U.S. had claims in this area, through its possession of the Philippines. This is because the Philippines are one of 10 so-called ASEAN (Southeast Asian) nations. Even to this day, the U.S. has certain treaty rights in the Philippines. That is to say that the U.S. retains a defensive interest in Philippine affairs, even ...


8

Manuel Quezon had previously served as one of the Philippines' two resident (nonvoting) commissioners to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1909 to 1916. The provision for the nonvoting commissioners had been established by the Philippine Organic Act (1902) (the "Cooper Act") While in post as commissioner, Quezon had lobbied for the passage of the ...


8

I guess the real reason is the same one which explains why there are so many movies about Vietnam in the US: when you lose a war you're in desperate need of heroes. The Spanish-Cuban-American War was a complete disaster for Spain, losing the last remnants of its former glorious empire and sending the country on a vain exercise of soul-searching that many ...


7

History of Panay was published by Central Philippine University (Jaro, Iloilo City). I'll leave the interpretation up to you other than to say there's nothing here to support the question's claim. From page 77-78: The early Filipinos had trade relations with the neighboring countries of Borneo, China, Japan, and Siam. Business was carried on chiefly by ...


7

Tom Au has offered a solid answer about the narrow view regarding colonial claims, but those are in 2016 mostly irrelevant. What is more relevant are claims, current and future, made under the current protocols for territorial waters of UN members and exclusive economic zones. This informs the rights to resources in seas and continental shelves. (ILOS is ...


7

Looking at a map of the Pacific, it's hard to say how the Allies would bypass such a large Japanese base and maintain their supply lines while preparing for an invasion of Japan. It's also hard to say where they'd stage the troops, vehicles, supplies, and airfields for the invasion if not the Philippines; the Marianas alone would be insufficient for the 50 ...


6

Here is a better version of the graph (click to enlarge). As you can see, the first dip follows, and can be nicely explained by the 1973-4 oil shock as @sempaiscuba commented. The second period you highlighted, however, actually bottomed out only in 1991, four years after the 1987 stock market crash. The Hang-Seng Index for the Hong Kong stock market, where ...


5

The United States had promised the Philippines independence in 1934, on a timetable to end in 1946, and kept that promise. Beginning in 1935, the Philippines had Commonwealth status as a stopgap. The Philippines had fallen "accidentally" to the United States in the Spanish American war, because it was a possession of Spain. In this regard, it was unlike ...


5

Martial law has been declared in the United states of America, a more or less democratic country, on several occasions. And as I remember, during martial law or at other times orders have been given, legal or not, to shoot or kill by other methods looters, or other criminals, or even non criminals. https://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2010/08/25/cops-...


4

According to the source of Wikipedia: "they shot the captain [Magellan] through the right leg with a poisoned arrow... [while the battle continue...] One of them wounded him [Magellan] on the left leg with a large cutlass, which resembles a scimitar, only being larger. That caused the captain to fall face downward, when immediately they rushed upon him with ...


4

In theory, history should not enter into this. China signed the UNCLOS, which specifies exactly what their territorial rights are in that area. They clearly did so with enthusiasm, as they were one of the charter signers way back in 1982. If they didn't want to abide by that agreement, they shouldn't have promised to do so. The US (or history prior to 16 ...


3

Quezon's best argument for Philippine independence was his highly successful record, first as U.S. Commissioner, 1909-1916, then Philippine Senator (including Senate President), 1916-34, and finally Philippine Presidency (under U.S. oversight) from 1935 onward. After he and his peers did such a good job, no one could deny that the Philippines were ready for ...


3

The other answers about the military difference to the Philippines garrison versus smaller islands, and the non-military necessity to "retake" the Philippines, all address good reasons. However, there's a logical glitch underlying this question: The invasion began on October 20, and the Battle of Leyte Gulf began on October 23. The invasion was the ...


3

It appears to be the early 18th century. Peter the Great was the first Russian monarch to have a strong interest in naval affairs. According to Wikipedia, "A strategy to 'explore the Far East via India and the Philippines to establish trade links.' was suggested to Peter the Great by the Siberia Governor Fydor I. Semyonov in 1722." The Russians first ...


2

The Vietnam War was fought very differently, with some zones of possible operation excluded for political reasons, in order to limit the spread of a small regional war fought to assist a troubled ally, which then morphed into a test of international will, with support provided by two major world powers. During the course of the fighting, the American people ...


2

I recall from some TV documentary saying that MacArthur was able to charm FDR to support his invasion of Philippines over the Nimitz plan. MacArthur's career in non-USA sources is more checkered than the hero image in USA sources. After the disaster of Philippines (when MacArthur let his air force to be destroyed on the ground, even if he was warned about ...


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