14

Xenophon gave specific reasons for some of his works but for others he did not. Xenophon (about 431 BC to 354 BC) produced a very wide range of work during his lifetime: historical, biographical, philosophical, instructional. He never stated a primary purpose for all his works and we can deduce that some of what he wrote was aimed at specific audiences. ...


8

There's a model of the Stoa Basileios (or Royal Stoa), seat of the archon basileus, at the end of 5th century BC on the site of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA). This is close to the date (399 BC) that Plato's Euthyphro took place. "Model of the Royal Stoa at the end of 5th c. B.C. with the addition of the annexes. Model realised ...


8

In a specific case, his work was clearly intended as instructional manual for others: His work On Horsemanship addresses cavalry officers and others either involved with the training of horses or the leading of mounted troops. Thus sitting "between" your two positions of "for future generations" and "for own satisfaction". The twist being that he almost ...


6

This is most probably a made up quote. Checking later editions was unfruitful, but Leonardo is so long out of these filthy copyright laws, we might as well look at J.P. Richter: "Leonardo. The Complete Works", 1888; found on Wikipedia: The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci. What is in there that has some semblance to the desired quote? Justice requires ...


6

According to The Da Vinci Globe (info here) the comment was made during reflection on Leonardo's study of how to accurately render surveyed maps onto a (nearly) spherical surface as a globe. If we can trust the translator, which seems reasonable from there being only a single common rendition of the quote, then the two key words would seem to be art and ...


6

Of course we can only conjecture (as we cannot know exactly what was in Xenophon's mind), so I conjecture that motivation was the same as for many modern writers: it is the desire to spread one's knowledge and ideas. To the contemporaries and to the later generations. There are additional, secondary motivations, of course, such as fame, respect in the ...


4

Deng was paraphrasing a well-known Chinese proverb. Context change in the Chinese foreign policy, and avoidance of conflict with the great powers (mostly the US, USSR collapsed soon after) . Before Deng Xiaoping , Chinese policy was to criticize the USA and the USSR on ideological grounds, and sometimes confront them directly (Korea, Vietnam, Sino-Soviet ...


3

Abraham and his almost sacrifice of his son Isaac might be a good example. Even though we do not know whether is a real event or just a metaphor. Spartans at Thermopylae battle are a good example as well. They died because they had to fulfill a tradition (principle) where their society was built, which was to die instead of return defeated.


2

I think the phenomenon is older than the recorded history. Literature is full of examples, since the beginning of its existence. Antigone is one example from Greek tragedy.


2

I think you found the source, which was creatively rephrased. A-Z Quotes has the citation to Davenport's translation of Diogenes for the quote: Herakleitos, Diogenes (2011). “Herakleitos and Diogenes: Translated from the Greek by Guy Davenport”, p.55, Wipf and Stock Publishers


2

I've done research in this field, and believe the simple answer is that utilitarian social policy in eC19 moved in the opposite direction from developments in clinical psychology at the same time. For example, the utilitarian creation of the New Poor Law in 1834 made workhouses more austere, with reduced diets and families separated by sex, not to mention ...


2

This is a Chinese idiom. In Chinese it is 韜光養晦、有所作為, meaning, "keep a low profile ( or hide our capacity ) and bide your time.", which means if more according to here "If one wants success at the strategy, hide your intention, wait until the opponents' will ( to power ) be reduced, show the opponent their profit from you, take a servile attitude to them so ...


1

Historiography roundly rejects both great man theories of history and national will theories of history. Both are considered pre-"modern" in terms of accounts of the past. The idea of "the individual" and action are both suspect. "Will," is generally rejected. The idea of summation of individuals producing a spirit doesn't exist. "Great events," are ...


1

Nietzsche went insane when he was about 40. His sister took possession of his affairs. She complied his unpublished writings and edited them. She, a big fan of Hitler, published some of her brother's unreleased works and edited a bit to fit the Nazi point of view better.


1

There was a story of an event that took place in Athens. A group of men were watching an athletic contest. An old man wandered into the auditorium, where all the seats were taken. Finally, one young man arose, and offered the old man his seat. The other young men in the vicinity applauded. The old man said something like, "You Athenians know what to do, but ...


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