67

It seems to be the painting Suppression of the Indian Revolt by the English, a painting by the Russian artist Vasily Vereshchagin c. 1884 According to the annotation on Wikipedia: It anachronistically depicts the events of 1857 with soldiers wearing (then current) uniforms of the late 19th century. The "photograph" originally appeared in a 1941 ...


66

Short answer: No. The only film footage of the RMS Titanic shows her being towed into the outfitting wharf at Belfast in February 1912, and moored at Belfast. A clip of Lusitania leaving port has often been shown as a substitute for Titanic's maiden voyage commencement (including in the 1958 film 'A Night to Remember*). No footage of Titanic leaving ...


32

Congratulations on your first question, justCal! The cropped version of the Mission Dolores photograph was published in George Robinson Fardon's famous 1856 album. I have the cheap Dover edition. As you found, a larger version also appears in the works of Carleton Watkins. Both men have been credited with this image, but both reprinted the work of another, ...


27

There is an article on this very subject. (http://militaryhistorynow.com/2012/06/12/how-early-photographers-captured-historys-first-images-of-war/). But we don't need to believe there were no other war photos. Since daguerreotype invention in 1839 there were the following wars in which Europeans participated: source: list of wars from wiki Russian Conquest ...


27

Cameras saw limited use in the Mexican War and in Britain's Crimean War, but their first significant use came during the American Civil War. Matthew Brady and his skilled assistants, among them Alexander Gardner and Timothy O'Sullivan, photographed not only the generals and their foot soldiers but also the battlefields strewn with the human debris of death—...


26

These are Polish Army Uniforms, starting around 1919. Unfortunately the main wiki pages show no Uniforms of the times. To my knowledge, these types of zig-zag collars (Polish only, but translates well to English) were in use sometime after 1918 until 1939 and are also unique to the Polish Army. Other photo collections, without dates show the simularity of ...


19

Radio Yerevan reports that: "In principle, yes, the photo is absolutely real. Except, that it isn't a real photo, its name isn't 'England's Revenge in India', and the propaganda book never claimed any of that". (See end of post for a quick resolution) The picture in the question has a wrong description at the German Propaganda Archive, it is also ...


16

French Wikipedia may be in error here. The English version shows the same photo but no specific time or date for it is mentioned. Given the timing involved, the 05:30 time may of course well be accurate for the moment the gentlemen left the carriage, but doesn't have to be when the photo was taken. For such a momentous moment, it's quite feasible that they ...


13

The photo is authentic. It is in numerous reliable archives. The exact time given in one wikipedia is just overly precise. That is: wrong. No other Wikipedia page gives that time. French Wikipedia: On November 11, 1918, around 5:30 a.m., just after the signing of the treaty, at the exit of the "Armistice wagon": in the foreground with a cane and a kepi, ...


13

I think we can narrow down your date-range to 1891-1903. According to the Directory of London Photographers, 1841-1908, by Michael Pritchard, Hermann Ernst's studio was only in St. Johns Wood between those dates. After that it moved to premises in Finchley Road, where it remained until after 1908 (the last date covered by the directory). His entry in the ...


13

It's a Panzer IVD of the 31st Panzer Regiment assigned to the 5th Panzer Div. commanded by Lt. Heinz Zobel lost on May 13th, 1940. The "lake" is the Meuse River. The man is a German pioneer. All credit to finding the Panzer of the Lake goes to ConeOfArc for coordinating the search, and miller786 and their team for finding the Panzer. Full sources ...


12

SHORT ANSWER For an international event, this may well be the Mexcian - American War (1846-48). In particular, there is an April 1847 picture showing what is probably first amputation photographed. For a regional or local event, the date can be pushed back to 1842 (see below). DETAILS Although the first photo dates back to 1826 or 1827 (see picture here), ...


11

Not of the ship sinking but there is one of the suspected iceberg it hit. The photo was taken from a ship sailing in the area some time later. As it passed by an iceberg someone noticed there were paint stains near the waterline. It was the only iceberg in the vicinity of the wreck Also a salvage vessel took some shots of a lifeboat picked up with a ...


11

From Wikipedia's reference desk (originally discussing moving images): On the German wikipedia, we had a fascinating discussion about the earliest born person of whom a photograph exists. We managed to go back to a birth date of around 1746 Skimming the German discussion, it seems the winner there was Hannah Stilley Gorbey, an elderly American lady ...


11

I think that the magazine on the right of the lower level of the table (right at the very bottom of the photo) is the May 1934 issue of Flying Aces -- see lumist.org for an image of the pulp. Since 1934 is also one of the calendric years, this seems like a moderately good guess. It also fits well with the general style of the pulp covers -- 20s pulps ...


10

Funeral of prince Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans, Paris, 3rd of August 1842 The 31 years old son and heir of France's last king, Louis-Philippe the first, died in a horse-car accident in 1842. This daguerreotype documenting his national funeral belongs nowadays to Paris' Orsay Museum. This photography, and many other pictures of Notre-Dame-de-Paris before its ...


8

After the death of his wife Betty Shabazz, the New York Public Library acquired Malcolm X's library. This included "22 archival boxes and binders of photographs, slides and negatives", now called The Malcolm X photograph collection. The photographs depict, besides the man himself, many events and places he visited, people he worked with, members of his ...


8

This is somewhat difficult to pinpoint to a single date. But from the basics to narrow the search: wild animals have been used for entertainment from pre-history, bears or tame-bears being among the most popular from the beginning. So that doesn't really give us a starting point for a search. But the invention of the bicycle does: Bicycles were introduced ...


8

Tank gun itself is short barrelled 7.5cm KwK 37, as mentioned in nvoigt comment. This means that the tank is either early PzKpfw IV (D to F1 versions employed in USSR) , or less likely PzKpfw III Ausf. N . However, PzKpfw III Ausf. N usually had armored skirts around turret and hull, plus camo pattern painted on. If we assume tank to be Pzkw IV, then it ...


7

Nicholas Jeeves of the Cambridge School of Art addresses this question well in a lengthy essay: The Serious and the Smirk: The Smile in Portraiture. In this sense, a portrait was never so much a record of a person, but a formalised ideal. The ambition was not to capture a moment, but a moral certainty. Politicians were particularly sensitive to ...


7

Some more breadcrumbs to aid in searches. Unclean results. Don't have more time now, but didn't want this all go to waste. Either help clean it up to make into a proper Community Wiki, or feel free to use the info here and take it into a properly formatted answer… We see the Vindictivelaan, which was so renamed after in 1918 the British HMS Vindictive was ...


6

Ok, we're an "internet based society" now, but we weren't then. How does all that physical media from before the Internet get onto the Internet? Somebody has to scan them, and catalog them, and store them. And then who pays to keep it there? High quality digital archiving is slow, expensive, and labor intensive. Most museums have an enormous backlog of ...


5

It is based on the standard Apple logo: and was modified to incorporate the silhouette of Steve Jobs to commemorate his death in 2011 by Hong Kong based Graphic Designer, Jonathan Mak Long.


5

Your question was helpful for my own research on Lee Miller. Nimet Eloui born Khairy was alive in 1935. After divorcing Aziz Eloui (who married Lee Miller) she eventually married a Russian prince, Nikolay Mestchersky (spelling varies). She died on 4 August 1942 and is buried in the Russian Orthodox cemetery of Sainte-Genevieve-des-Bois about 40km south of ...


4

Thomas Wedgwood's portrait is not a photograph. If you click on the picture and look at the attribution of Wedgwood's portrait on the Wikipedia page, it states: From a chalk drawing belonging to Miss Wedgwood, of Leith Hill Place. Artist unknown.


4

Some sites have a different term for the item Booth is carrying, a riding crop. The website Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History shows a thumbnail of Booth with the same item, description is John Wilkes Booth seated view holding riding crop between his legs The wiki page for Booth has a link on the bottom to another image, the description here ...


4

Looks like the photographer Vernon Merritt III didn't document the name: Woman Possibly Model, W. Long Hair wearing short skirt, lace top & sandals, walking up street, re story on New York look in fashion. (Photo by Vernon Merritt III/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) Image provided by Getty Images. by Vernon Merritt III (— This picture taken ...


4

This is a placeholder for an answer. This is definitely a Polish uniform. The cap shape and collar decoration are distinctively Polish. The cut of the uniform looks World War I-ish. I don't think the Sam Browne belt was much used outside Britain until about 1910, and became extremely widespread after World War I. The Wikipedia article on Sam Browne belts ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible