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25

This story almost certainly relates to the invasion of Poland (1655-60) by the Swedes and their allies during the reign of the Swedish king Charles X, but it has been considerably embellished in that the Swedes took artifacts and decorative parts of castles rather than a whole castle. The known sinkings from which artefacts have been recovered occurred in ...


24

The symbol, though defaced, is probably the symbol of the Hitlerjugend. Click the link to see the actual image, I don't want to post it here, since it would be a legal grey area for me to do so for reasons also explained in the wikipedia page. The L.D. and H.J. probably stand for "Landdienst" and "Hitlerjugend". Landdienst was a branch or ...


17

Interpretations are called for here — and these are necessarily opinionated to a degree. From a recent Polish perspective, it might seem rather simple – and one-sided: There are strong indications that Beijing's position, which opposed armed intervention, had a significant influence on the Kremlin. This was by no means out of warm attitudes towards Gomułka ...


12

For the countries of the former Warsaw Pact borders were normally restricted to permitted traffic. Borders themselves were patrolled and places where one could cross it were limited. Mind you that permission to cross the border was not only for the "entering another country" part, one had to have permission to be able to leave one's home country, ...


2

Just from asking around a little here is a bit about the situation between East Germany and Czechoslovakia in the 1980s (sorry, no online sources): Crossing the border at official checkpoints was easy and common. Vacations in Czechoslovakia were also quite common and were usually organized independently (unlike e.g. the USSR which was only really accessible ...


2

The names were distorted while they were written down by the clerks, especially during issuing certificates of various kinds. It was a problem for lower class citizens - the nobility kept their own names intact. I can give you examples of such distortion from the Pomeranian region rather than Silesia region - a Polish name Kętrzyński was changed to ...


1

On August 31, 1939 Reich's Foreign Ministry sent and ultimatum to the Polish Government, a so-called "16 points ultimatum". This is basically a reiteration and expansion on the earlier demands, but they have to be considered in the broader context. The Non-Aggression treaty of 1934 between Germany and Poland has been terminated. There are ...


1

That is hard to put into actual numbers. What is clear is that this has happened. But it seems that Rhineland Poles, in the most Western part of Prussia – were subject to such practices on a much bigger scale – which might still be relatively small for the more radical changes – than those in genuinely former Polish territory now under Prussian control ...


1

Regarding the qeustion of 'when did Poland become a protectorate of Russia' (@Felix), this was essentially defacto established in 1710 after Poland's conclusion of the Great Northern War. It had entered the war in a fairly good position (ie, balanced coalition between her and Russia), but after failing and then having a civil war during this time, and Russia ...


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