20

For the US, there's an article on Constitution Daily which says something about this. First it says: At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, there was little public debate about the age requirements and no discussion about the age requirement for the presidency. Then it gets more helpful when it refers to James Monroe. James Monroe also ...


3

As far as I understand this question, it seems to be based on false assumptions. When did Americans start to use the expression? Immediately when they became Americans? In fact, when they were still loyal subjects of the king! As they also were lucky enough to have had the Rights of Englishman. It was inherited? Longman dictionary: it’s a free country ...


3

Assuming that you are focusing on how the Supreme Court's wishes were enforced, and how they were unilaterally able to amass so much power for themselves and the rest of the Judicial branch, and having its will enacted by the actual government agents, this is a very good question. The three branches of the Government have never been absolutely co-equal, ...


3

Question: Why did anyone respect Marbury v. Madison? The court is so weak that Jefferson would ignore any ruling against him. The court, essentially, rules against Jefferson indirectly by giving itself the power of judicial review. ??? The court has the undisputed power of judicial review. Short Answer The ...


2

Not sure if you are asking about the complete expression 'it's a free country', but the concept of freedom and the shorter expression 'free country' was already used when the USA was created. In general, if you read Burke, it is always there. Burke generally liked America, he was against the war, against the taxation that broke the colonial pact, and before ...


2

As mentionned in another answer, from a French point of view, Napoleon III did a lot of things. But this was not always for the good reasons: He did improve the streets and buildings in Paris. This was partly to ensure a better security in the city: famous Haussman boulevards were made for troops to manoeuver against a riot. The transformation of the city ...


1

The saying seems to predate 1826, when Edward Thornton Tayloe wrote (in Mexico 1825-1828, p. 128) that: We have more than once since we have been in Mexico been induced to inquire if we were in a free country.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible