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-1

Yes - they are harder to recognize because it usually seems so natural to do the right thing that we can forget the historical precedents. From World War Two alone we see: FDR started rearming the U.S. in early 1940 instead of waiting until Dec. 1941 - thus avoiding the very long buildup required by U.S. forces in WW1. He had served in Wilson's ...


3

The design of the US's Federal government was indisputably based on lessons that the Founding Fathers took from the Roman Republic -- this comes up repeatedly in their writings. See, for example, this precis. In general, though, I think it's hard to find cases where the historical precedent can be shown to have been the main driver of a decision. Except by ...


0

The problem with your question is that history gets forgotten when it's not in living memory. As such, decisions tend to factor only lessons learned from recent history. There are examples, mind you. For instance, compare the aftermaths of WW1 and WW2. A few things that happened after WW2, such as the UN, factored in some of the lessons learned from what ...


4

I will refer to the science based claims of the OP questions leaving aside social and political reasons. I think the other answer though factually fair is a little loaded with personal opinions which are not factual. To be precise the risk of severe adverse effects is 1 in a million. Risk for UK fatal car accidents is 1 in 20000 or according to UK ...


-9

<Note: the below answer contains images that show the typical symptoms of smallpox, as well images of the rare adverse reactions to the smallpox vaccine. These images are not pleasant, so please skip this answer if you do not wish to see them.> All medical procedures carry inherent risks, as well as potential benefits. While some other interventions, e....


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