New answers tagged

0

If you read Plato's Republic, Socrates thought that democracy would lead to dictatorship. Socrates has five levels of society, in descending order of his preference, and one leads to another in that order: 1. Kingship, 2. Timocracy, 3. Oligarchy, 4. Democracy, 5. Dictatorship. So given that such dominant thinker as Socrates has so great an influence on ...


-1

The Enlightenment was not about "democracy," per se. It was really about "natural law," which meant checks on the power of governments generally, and kings specifically. I can identify roughly three groups of Enlightenment thinkers, only one of which is "democracy" leaning. These include John Locke and Rousseau. At the other end ...


2

To separate people cleanly into "racist" and "non-racist" does not reflect reality, and certainly doesn't reflect the reality of JFK or LBJ. They both did a lot of good towards racial justice, but they certainly were both racist in their own ways. But if you want an example that educated white people with strong anti-racist reputations ...


1

Sum it up "Negro" was the word. Before the 1920's it was "Colored" W.E.B. Du Bois, along with Booker T. Washington advocated for replacing with "Negro" After the 1920's. In the 80's after the black power movement faded, many of it's leaders decided another semantic change was required. Jesse Jackson led the push toward African-...


2

I would assume the author you are citing means something like direct democracy or selforganizing locally from the ground up. In the history of politics very few people were actually in favour of such a kind of radical democracy (why should they anyway? they would lose their power). Even Robespierre was not for direct democracy but for a representative system ...


77

One must be careful in reading the word "democracy" as it has multiple meanings - and many writers will deliberately conflate and inter-change the meanings with intent to deceive. One sense is the very literal Athenian democracy - which might be regarded as government by plebiscite. Here every significant public decision is made by a direct appeal ...


15

There is a Wikipedia article for the word Negro, which may shed some light on the issue. Within that article is a section on the history of the use of the word in the US. It appears the usage by MLK is at the end of the time period where the word Negro was more accepted (emphasis mine): "Negro" was accepted as normal, both as exonym and endonym, ...


5

What exactly happened at early things is sparsely recorded, if not to say for really earlier times wholly non-existent as traditional sources. Without written sources, things get complicated. But we have hints. Among those is that for a medieval perspective this civilising tendency was apparently comparably late, and parallel in temporal development with the ...


3

After more research it appears, that weapons might have not been allowed in Norwegian Things (or at least Gulathing) at all and were only used as a way of showing agreement in Germanic tradition. Wikipedia:Thing


Top 50 recent answers are included