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WRT the Chinese in particular, perhaps they just didn't care. They could buy their trepang from the people who harvested it, just as the could sell silk to merchants, without caring where the trepang came from, or where the silk went. With very few exceptions (such as Zheng He) the Chinese didn't do exploration, and certainly not the organized "...


2

Most probably this is good old plain racism and motivated reasoning: When 'discovered' by European settlers — in the 18th and early 19th century — such artifacts of the 'mound builders' clearly show some form of 'advanced civilization' and sophistication. So, surely, nothing the barbarous Indians could have ever accomplished. Some European nobleman just must ...


1

Geographic discovery like that of Australia is also political and was done by states. We have to think in terms of political authority. Who would have been interested in Australia and what Australia would have meant to (and be called by) them. the Chinese themselves and other Asians never picked up any awareness of Australia's existence. There's no ...


1

I think the answer can best be understood by taking from the point of view of the people on the ground at the time: All they knew is that there were a few products of minor value to be gotten from a land located well beyond many other equally large (as far as they could tell) islands. We know they were knocking on the door of a whole continent. But as far ...


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