15

As noted (paywalled) the majority of POW could not escape, and many did not try to for various reasons including those in the original question and the simple fact that if several thousand POW try to escape at once people die. The key part is that some did want to escape, and got movies made about them (there were 10,000 people in Stalag Luft III, and only ...


8

The question is extremely vague because the main concepts are too generic (conquering armies, conquered populations; and that covers the entire time span of war history up to the present); different moments involve very different scenarios: there are great differences between the ways in which such a phenomenon could have occurred is a tribal union, in the ...


7

Get to the end of the book I've also read this book. Towards the end of the war the German guards were ordered to kill all of the remaining prisoners in Stalag Luft III, and presumably the same orders were given to guards in other camps. In Stalag Luft III they declined to do that - to what extent fear of reprisals, principle, and anger towards their country'...


4

Duty, Boredom, Chance of Success Why would a service member escape? A prisoner in a POW camp is, almost by definition, being kept by his/her captor as cheaply as possibly without actually being killed. A POW camp might have hundreds or even thousands of prisoners with a relative handful of guards. The more the POWs attempt even unsuccessful escapes, the ...


3

In the American Civil War, both sides recruited from their POWs. Most entered US service and smaller number of Union POWs entered Confederate service. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanized_Yankees


3

During WW2 you had: Russian Liberation Army. These soldiers fought for the Germans and consisted out of former POWs. British Free Corps. These fought also on the side of the Germans and partialy consisted out of British POWs and volunteers. National Committee for Free Germany. While technically not an army, but you may consider their efforts an attempt to ...


2

In the Russian Civil war of 1918-21, the incorporation of prisoners was so standard operation that some people changed sides many times. They had to choose from being shot or dying from starvation in the camp, against maybe remaining alive by means of "voluntary" incorporation. Such mass incorporations happened practically after every battle. Not ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible