42

Yes. Ample supply. At least for print and radio. Newspapers and magazines Not really 'broadcast medium', but mentioned in the question: Many versions printed directly under the auspices of a communist party, and openly sold as such. Example the Peking Review. — West-German National football (soccer) team player Paul Breitner, Maoist at the time, reading the ...


11

Let me add to the previous answer some Soviet media outlets. Soviet Union, a journal published in 18 languages. It had a supplement called "Sports in the USSR". Moscow news - a newspaper published in English, and several other languages. (In 1970s this was the only periodical in English available to most Soviet citizens, so students read it to ...


7

@LangLangC's answer mentioned This gets even more interesting when one would look at the propaganda against each each other between Soviet Union and China but did not go into details. There is evidence suggesting that in the early 1980s until 1989, Chinese authorities prioritised jamming Soviet, Vietnamese and Taiwanese radio stations over Western radio ...


5

Question: Did the Soviet Union or its satellite states have any broadcast propaganda media for an international audience? The official international radio service for the Soviet Union was Radio Moscow, or Radio Moscow International Broadcast Service. Its first broadcast was in 1923 in German. By 1931 it operated under 8 languages, By 1970 it broadcast in ...


1

As Estonia is close to Finland, most time of the Soviet occupation was in Estonian Radio a department of Finnish broadcast. It started in 1947 (actually March 14th 1947, according to the chronicle of Estonian broadcasting, in Estonian, on the webpage of Estonian Broadcasting Museum) as Soviet propaganda channel and shifted to Estonian info channel during ...


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