84

You could call it a 'large scale protest' that following the Presidential election held on 6 November 1860, I assume once the votes were counted and reported by telegraph it was known by 7 or 8 November that Abraham Lincoln had won, the state legislature of South Carolina voted on 9 November to declare Lincoln's election a hostile act and its intention to ...


26

During the 1960s, non-violent protest was more effective than violent protest at bringing about desegregation in southern cities - especially where black protest groups had some economic leverage over the local community. We know this thanks to a recent quantitative study, which found that cities with sit-in protests were much more likely to desegregate ...


25

I don't recall hearing about protests after Obama's election, or inauguration. George W Bush's election took until December 12th to become definite because of the lawsuits over the Florida voting and recounts. There were protests over that at his inauguration. You can find some more documentation easily with Google: here's an example search.


25

This is probably a very debatable question, but I think I can make the argument, with good historical backing, that it was the non-violent protests that were most effective in what progress was made in the Civil Rights movement. Firstly I make this argument in deference to the leaders on the ground. A reading of Freedom Summer, by Bruce Watson* shows that ...


13

There is a history of anti-Chinese sentiment in Indonesia, but even taking that into consideration, the violence of 1998 was unusually extreme and virulent, attributed to the encouragement of the army and the Suharto regime. Jemma Purdey's Anti-Chinese Violence in Indonesia, 1996–1999 (2006) examines large-scale violence of the kind exemplfieid by the 1998 ...


12

There are isolated instances of flag desecration in America's colonial and revolutionary past, but the perpetrators were not especially influential. Although a scattering of flag desecration incidents speckled American history prior to the twentieth century, none of them aroused any form of institutionalized legal response until shortly before 1900. ...


10

It was very rare. In Montgomery (which OP specifically asks about), the passengers mentioned above are the only other passengers arrested before Parks, according to History.com, this NPR story, and every other source I can find. This is further corroborated by a flyer circulated by Montgomery's Women's Political Council after Parks' arrest. According to ...


10

Largely from Hinduism and Jainism. Adding onto this was his exposure to Buddhist and Theosophical thought while he was a student in London. His eventual philosophy of Satyagraha came to fruition from his experiences in South Africa.


8

From Hinduism into which he was born. He was influenced by Jainism later. Jainism borrowed the concept of "ahimsa" or non-violence from Hinduism. Jains adopted and followed it with much greater rigor.


7

You are referring to the 1999 Seattle WTO Ministerial Conference Protests. It is historically notable for breaking ground in two respects: 1) The way it was organized by the Direct Action Network (pdf) - their organization techniques allowed very different political allies to effectively communicate and collaborate with each other. This was more in-person ...


5

Khrushchev gave his speech to a closed session of the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union on 25 February 1956. The contents of the speech was subsequently disseminated to a select group by being read to groups of party activists and “closed” local party meetings. Even though knowledge of the speech was limited to a select group, that ...


4

While Indian traditions have certainly influenced Gandhi very much, one mustn't neglect the large influence that Western (broadly construed) thought had on him. For instance, he was very influenced by Tolstoy. I am quoting the review of a new book that compares Gandhi to the Stoics: Sorabji explains that Gandhi's biggest direct inspirations were John ...


2

What was written above is all correct; may be just some psychological addendum to it: a basic dogma of communism was from the beginning on (that means before 1917), that the Communist Party, and especially Lenin and later also Stalin are always right. Always. It was especially hard to keep that up in the 30s and 40s of the 20th century, when people who were ...


2

BDS itself had limited economic effects, according to a study of South African financial markets: Abstract: We study the most important legislative and shareholder boycott to date, the boycott of South Africa's apartheid regime, and find that corporate involvement with South Africa was so small that the announcement of legislative/shareholder ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible