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59

The quote is by Harold Geneen from his 1984 book Managing. I first found evidence of this from Wikiquote: When you have mastered the numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading a book. You will be reading meanings. Managing, Chapter Nine (The Numbers), p. 151. To verify, I did a ...


56

Good editor. I wouldn't have thought to challenge that, but its true that numbers weren't exactly Du Bois' thing. Not saying he wasn't good with them, just that isn't what he's famous for, or spent most of his time dealing with. In fact, the actual source of that quote appears to be Harold Geneen, an accountant by training who retired as CEO of ITT. ...


50

Charles de Gaulle, shortly before French surrender (The Appeal of 18 June - 18/06/1940): "France has lost the battle but she has not lost the war." (Source: The Lincoln Institute). Delivered from the BBC studio in Oxford Street, London. La France a perdu une bataille. Mais la France n'a pas perdu la guerre! The main purpose of the speech was to rally as ...


46

From The Complete Works of Benjamin Franklin (published 1888), clipped from a letter to Charles Dumas, dated 6 Aug, 1781: Some writer, I forget who, says that Holland is no longer a nation but a great shop and I begin to think it has no other principles or sentiments but those of a shopkeeper You can judge of it better than I and I shall be happy to find ...


39

That appears to be adapted from a passage in "The History of Freedom in Antiquity", which was both an essay and a lecture Lord Acton once gave. Liberty, next to religion, has been the motive of good deeds and the common pretext of crime . . . In every age its progress has been beset by its natural enemies, by ignorance and superstition, by lust of ...


33

In his book Pushing to the Front (1894), Orison Swett Marden wrote: Napoleon laid great stress upon that ‘supreme moment,’ that ‘nick of time’ which occurs in every battle, to take advantage of which means victory, and to lose in hesitation means disaster. He said that he beat the Austrians because they did not know the value of five minutes; and it has ...


33

This has been quoted a few times, in slight variation, like here, with attribution indeed to Disraeli: — Harry Blamires: "The Victorian Age of Literature", Longman literature guides, Longman, 1988. p10 (gBooks) And used here as well: He [Prince Albert] never became really popular with the aristocracy or the working man, but it was otherwise with ...


29

I think this adage is very old and has been rephrased countless times (though with slight modifications), but the modern English adaption might be from the 20th century: King Wuling, "A talent for following the ways of yesterday is not sufficient to improve the world of today." [Warring States Period] Lieut. Col. J. L. Schley, "It has been ...


27

600 - 300 BC The counts of the indictment are luxury, bad manners, contempt for authority, disrespect to elders, and a love for chatter in place of exercise. … Children began to be the tyrants, not the slaves, of their households. They no longer rose from their seats when an elder entered the room; they contradicted their parents, chattered before company, ...


27

I believe the authors are paraphrasing a fairly well-known extract from a draft of a letter from Newton to Pierre Des Maizeaux, written in 1718. The extract in full reads as follows: In the beginning of the year 1665 1 found the method of approximating series and the rule for reducing any dignity [power] of any binomial into such a series. The same year ...


26

The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations has the following citation for that quote: (apologies for the limited quality of the scan. I'm using my hand-held scanner.) As their source, they cite The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton by By Karl Pearson (p415): Interestingly, unless he is quoting from a source that he does not cite (such as a letter from ...


22

It apparently happened during Caesar's campaign against Scipio and Juba in 47BC, part of the wider Roman Civil War that was fought from 49–45BC. The story was recorded by Suetonius (Life of Julius Caesar: 59). The quote, as it has come down to us from Suetonius, was: "teneo te," inquit, "Africa." or "I hold you, Africa", he said. Although amusing ...


22

L’Histoire en citation mentions this quote: Donnez un verre de sang à ce cannibale : il a soif ! which I would translate as: Give a glass of blood to this cannibal: he is thirsty! It is attributed to Pierre Victurnien Vergniaud addressing Marat at the Convention’s tribune on the 13 April 1793. Their own source is: Procès fameux extraits de l’...


20

The saying is apocryphal and was originated by the populist author T. Cushing Daniel, a Washington-based lobbyist and lawyer, in his testimony before the U.S. Congress in 1911 in hearings on House Resolution 314 (whether financiers were restricting trade by domination of the money supply). This is what Daniel said: William Pitt made this statement: "Let ...


19

You are possibly referring to this: After visiting these two places you can easily see how that within a few years Hitler will emerge from the hatred that surrounds him now as one of the most significant figures who ever lived. He had boundless ambition for his country, which rendered him a menace to the peace of the world, but he had a mystery ...


18

@YannisRizos answered the question. It is not known what he said, but the result was that the Roman masses became very angry with Caesar's murderers, burnt down their houses and made them flee from he city. Livius Appian's transcript of Mark Anthony's funeral oration, suggests that Shakespeare wrote for the stage, not for historical accuracy (although ...


18

The attribution certainly predates Lenin. A Google Book search indicates that it was well-established by at least 1890: "Wenn Napoleon sagte: »on s'engage et puis on voit!« so bezeichnet er damit nur das Verfahren aller selbstständigeren Heerund Trnppenführer." [Monatshefte für Politik und Wehrmacht, p.284, 1889] "Le mot de Napoléon : « On s'...


18

I am not sure what Hitler did know about the political details of Spain and I certainly cannot be sure of what he was thinking, so I will just laid out some data and thoughts: While Franco's side is usually labeled as "fascist", the truth is that it was a blend of forces, including the Church, traditionalists and monarchists of several branches, grand ...


17

Napoleon is widely described as either a demigod or a demon / devil, though, as Danila Smirnov mentioned, not immortal. Might you be misremembering this, or perhaps something like it: Napoleon . . . [is] sometimes cast as a demigod, sometimes as a demon, practically always seen as a figure considerably larger than life. Probably no other mortal has ...


16

Like most internet “quotes”, this is actually fake. But Diderot said something quite similar in his poem: “Les Éleuthéromanes” : J'en atteste les temps; j'en appelle à tout âge; Jamais au public avantage L'homme n'a franchement sacrifié ses droits; S'il osait de son cœur n'écouter que la voix, Changeant tout à coup de langage, ...


16

1) 1897 The earliest reference I could find is Christoph von Tiedemann on p. 42 of Persönliche Erinnerungen an den Fürsten Bismarck (S. Hirze, 1898, link) based on a 1897 talk: "ich habe nicht schlafen können, ich habe die ganze Nacht gehaßt", sagte er mir eines Morgens Von Tiedemann knew von Bismarck personally and spent a lot of time with him. The ...


16

It may this line from E. Franklin Frazier, 1962: The Negro, according to Adams, could only be partially assimilated or, in our language, integrated but not assimilated. To which his definition of terms seems important: How does integration differ from assimilation? Assimilation involves, of course, integration for it is difficult to see how any people or ...


15

Short Answer The Kidnapper is the United States/Roosevelt. The Hooligan is Britain/Churchill. The Bully was the Soviet Union/Stalin. For reference, this is the original passage from Chiang's diary: 聯合國中之四國,我為最弱,甚以弱者遇拐子、流氓與土霸為可危,也識知:人非自強,任何人亦不能為助。而國家之不求自強,則無論為敵為友,皆一汝為俎上之肉,可不戒懼? Of the four members of the United Nations, we are the weakest; it is ...


15

The idea originated with the memorialist Françoise Bertaut de Motteville who only entered the French court after Richelieu had died, so she was reporting rumors she heard from people who knew Richelieu personally. In her memoirs published in 1723, she wrote the following in volume one: Laffemas avoit promis au Ministre qu'il le tourmenteroit si bien qu'...


15

Probably Abraham Lincoln. While the specific "quote" is almost certainly manufactured, the core idea could easily have been taken from Lincoln's Lyceum Address. In that speech, Lincoln warned that the mortal danger to the United States was not foreign but domestic: At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer. If it ever reach ...


15

It's apparently a mystery. Cursory googling using the date tools suggests that the quote attributed to her began to appear out of nowhere in Facebook's early days, and it has been a mystery ever since. See e.g.: https://adamnathan.com/2012/11/18/alexandra-k-trenfor-john-galt/ (which you've noted too) http://rogerneill.blogspot.com/2012/12/#...


14

Your last quote from Bourrienne seems to be the most correct version. Essentially, the context is that Napoleon held a very high opinion of the East and wanted to organize expeditions at least as far as India. The quote seems to have been said before his expedition to Egypt, and was likely in reference to further eastward expeditions. Since Bourrienne was ...


14

The Yale Book of Quotations (edited by Fred R. Shapiro) mentions several quotations related to that one. The most likely inspiration for Kennedy's line seems to be the following passage from Khalil Gibran's 1925 essay "The New Frontier": Are you a politician asking what your country can do for you or a zealous one asking what you can do for your ...


14

I don't believe there is a canonical name for that one principle, all by itself. Rather this is one of the common principles of Source Criticism, which are intended to be used together (highlighting mine): The following principles are cited from two Scandinavian textbooks on source criticism, written by the historians Olden-Jørgensen (1998) and Thurén (1997)...


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