Hot answers tagged

111

For once that was an ideal. And a goal. To be 'restored'. By racial breeding and struggle. And it was readily apparent to really everyone that not every German was blonde. That said, Hitler himself was not a "perfect example", but he also wasn't the complete opposite of that concept either, as he had blue eyes: And was also with 175cm quite ...


74

(Disclaimer: definition of race varies. Wikipedia offers this: "a grouping of humans based on shared physical or social qualities into categories generally viewed as distinct by society" and that is the view taken in this answer. Some of you prefer to define race by skin colour, in which case feel free to ignore Aristotle.) Racism is a very ancient concept. ...


66

Short and "to the point" answer: Those numbers are just identifiers for various school district organization plans. The digits refer to the number of years a student spends in each "section" of a schooling system. The general notation is A-B-C, where "A" is the number of years in primary school (elementary school), "B" ...


55

Yes, Ronald Reagan frequently denied being racist. In 1983, Reagan wrote a letter to Benjamin Hooks, then head of the NAACP, stating (in response to accusations that he wanted to rollback civil rights) that: Ben, if only it were possible to look into each other's hearts and minds, you would find no trace of prejudice or bigotry in mine. Skinner, ...


38

Because of emigration restrictions from the Soviet Union imposed from at least the 1920's on, there were very few ethnic Russians of recent arrival in the U.S., and the Western world in general, during the 1950's. Those ethnic Russians (and Ukrainians) had mostly arrived during the late 19th, or very early 20th, century. By the 1950's ethnic Slavs were ...


28

There's no universally recognised "father of scientific racism", though a number of names could be suggested. One example is the French noble Arthur de Gobineau, best remembered today for pioneering the concept of an Aryan master race. His infamous An Essay on the Inequality of the Human Races, published in 1853, inspired a host of other racial theories ...


28

IANAH(*), so I can't (and won't) answer about the rest of the world, but in the XVI-XVIII centuries, colonial spaniards took race pretty seriously, dividing them in castes. Here you see a contemporary table for race categorization painted in the XVIII century, according to wikipedia. The table is pretty thorough, detailing to which caste you belonged ...


26

Didn't search very far, but it looks like Bill Clinton did. He wasn't president anymore at the time though. According to the ABC news article, Bill said: There are things that I wished I urged her to do. Things I wished I had said, things I wished I hadn't said. But I am not a racist. I never made a racist comment and I did not attack him personally. This ...


26

In the early middle ages or ancient times that might have been the case. But certainly not by the 19th or early 20th century - scientific/darwinist racism was in full swing by then. 17th century France had its Code Noir, and slave codes weren't unique to colonial France, so the quote you cite seems to give an unrealistic picture of attitudes at best. A few ...


23

The thing is, it was never about the signs. For example, a quick perusal of this Civil Rights Chronology will show you that after the US Supreme Court ruled segregated public schools illegal, it was 3 full years before Little Rock, AR integrated theirs (and then the black schoolkids required armed protection from the US Army to get into the building). Then ...


22

Reconstruction was dead in some states almost as soon as it started, and it was completely undone nationwide by the compromise that led to the election of Rutherford B. Hayes as President in 1876. The lasting social damage that the song talks about should more accurately be associated with the demise of Reconstruction. Here are some legacies of the time ...


21

Because interracial marriage and intimate relationships were still illegal in several US states at the time, including the state of Virgina, where the movie is taking place, at the time it is taking place. The couple got married in Washington D.C., where such marriage was legal. (Traveling there from their Virginia residence for the sake of marriage, and ...


19

At times, it was, but not in the period that movie is depicting. One should note that there were three organizations under that name in different historical periods. While similar in their goals, they were still quite different. In the period the movie is depicting, the KKK of 1920s was primarily a political organization uniting white Protestants against ...


17

Question: What do the numbers on this 1960s anti-integration sign mean? short answer: The numbers 6-3-3 and 5-4-3, adding up to 12 are references to school system organizational plans. Americans attend 12 years of public school stacked in Elementary, Middle, and High school. Public schools are decentralized and their organization reflects local county ...


16

This is one of those stereotypes which, as this question demonstrates, is older then we realize. The entry in wikipedia touches on the assumed meaning: that African Americans have an unusually great appetite for watermelons but its history seems best summed up in this article from The Atlantic: The trope came into full force when slaves won their ...


14

Limiting ourselves to the USA team, there were 18 African-American Olympians on the 1936 USA Olympic Team. These athletes won total of 13 medals. And in winning these 13 medals, the African-American athletes finished ahead of the top German athlete every time: 100-m dash: Jesse Owens won gold & Ralph Metcalfe won silver. Germany did not win a medal. ...


13

The context for this specific photo was that a number of Japanese-Americans had been looking for housing in Hollywood, where they worked in menial positions. In response, white residents formed something called the "Hollywood Protective Association" in 1923 and campaigned to "keep Hollywood white".1 This is a photo of a member of that organisation, pointing ...


13

There is a history of anti-Chinese sentiment in Indonesia, but even taking that into consideration, the violence of 1998 was unusually extreme and virulent, attributed to the encouragement of the army and the Suharto regime. Jemma Purdey's Anti-Chinese Violence in Indonesia, 1996–1999 (2006) examines large-scale violence of the kind exemplfieid by the 1998 ...


12

I believe Benjamin Isaac's interpretation of the quote as racism is horse manure. The quote itself, as presented in your OP, is clearly an argument that the climate and laws prevalent in Asia at the time make for a cowardly and torpid culture, not the race of those individuals. This is bolstered by this point made with vigour by the author (my emphasis): ...


12

Yes. The perception in the Kennedy administration is that there was no alternative but to appoint pro-segregationist anti-civil rights district judges to most southern districts. Both Senators from the state in which a judge would serve must approve of the appointment before the full Senate even considers the appointment. Inevitably, then, district judges ...


12

Under the Yuan Dynasty, although the Mongols were the most privileged group politically, they were not the dominant group demographically. In fact, Mongols were an extremely tiny minority in Yuan China. It's essentially impossible for <1% of the population to assimilate the rest - they're way more likely to be assimilated into the majority. As such, it ...


12

I heard from many sources that the fictional 1984 Robin Williams movie Moscow on the Hudson had it pretty well nailed*. Russians didn't really have it significantly worse than any other immigrant group, but that isn't necessarily saying much. People who came to the US expecting life to be all wine and roses were of course in for a shock. My memory of things ...


11

My uncle, "California" Jackie Wilson won the silver medal in the 1936 Berlin Olympics at bantamweight.


11

Question: Why did Nathan Bedford Forrest leave the KKK? Background Nathan Bedford Forrest was a wealthy plantation owner prior to the Civil war. A true believer in the South's cause. Given Forrest's wealth and the number of slaves he owned he was exempt from service in the Confederate Army. Still Forrest enlisted as a private on June 14, 1861, six ...


11

Early Colonial America may not have been entirely race-blind, but it certainly wasn't the racially polarized place later America became. My own ancestor, Bazabeel Norman, was a free black soldier at the time of the American Revolutionary War. One of his grandparents was a white indentured servant, presumably in the late 1600s or early 1700s, so clearly ...


10

As near as I can tell, the Australian IOC's position was that, since there was no official recorded blacklisting of Peter Norman, there's no proof it ever happened, and they shouldn't have to apologize for something that didn't happen. There was no punishment dealt out to Peter Norman following the 1968 incident with black power salute. He was not ...


10

That source is pretty dubious, given that it's a wiki about TV tropes, and that the page no longer contains the content you quote, for starters. For finishers, Germans speak German, rather than [Canadian] English, so the idea that Hitler would use an obscure letter from an obscure Canadian, in a different language on which to base the name of his genocide ...


9

At least one Black head of state was received on an official visit prior to the Civil Rights era. This was Liberian President Edwin Barclay who followed FDR's 1942 visit to Liberia by making an official visit to Washington, DC in 1943. Per Wikipedia, he had a mixed ethnic background, and "was the first black man to be officially introduced from the rostrum ...


9

In the years before the Kennedy administration, visiting African dignitaries, mostly from Liberia and Ethiopia, could hope for (but not expect) the red carpet to be rolled out / meet a senior government official up to and including the president. However, when travelling around / visiting places, most could expect to be exposed to segregation and other ...


9

You are asking about "Ausländerkinder-Pflegestätte", though many other terms where used. Pflegestätten were established after a decree by Heinrich Himmler in 1943. The children where separated, shortly after birth, from their mothers so the mothers could return to their forced labor. The babies would be kept in abysmal conditions with systematic ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible