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53

It's actually quite difficult to point to a specific answer because, as your Boudica example shows, in many cases casualty estimates are not very reliable. The 80,000 figure given for Boudica's forces is considered to be a rhetorical device and not an actual factual number - a problem that plagues many pre-modern accounts. Another difficulty is measuring ...


30

Among the rulers we're pretty certain about: William IV of Henneberg-Schleusingen lived for ~84 years. Note that Henneberg-Schleusingen was a princely state within the Holy Roman Empire, so whether he counts as "monarch" depends on your definitions. In any case this was the tail end of the Middle Ages - his reign started in 1480, but it was early modern ...


27

Pearl Harbor attack: Discarding the materiel lost, the USA had 2,335 killed and 1,143 wounded, while Japan had only 64 killed and 1 prisoner. That makes a ratio of 1:56. If one adds in the materiel probably the difference is quite bigger. Battle of Sidi Barrani: During operation Compass, the British had 624 losses, while Italy had 2,194 killed, 2,286 ...


22

I can think of one. He dropped out of high school and spent a large part of early adult years as a homeless, wandering man, with an affinity for painting, from which he sometimes made a living, although not the one he dreamed about. This period of life ended when he joined the military, rose to lance corporal, was wounded twice, and was decorated for ...


20

Vaclav Havel Went from prisoner to president of Czechoslovakia in a few months. Ruhollah Khomeini went from exiled dissident to leader of Iran in a couple of months. Vladimir Lenin went from exiled dissident to leader of Soviet Russia in around six months. Nelson Mandela went from prisoner to president of South Africa in four years.


19

It is difficult to give an answer, what is a major historical event? According Wikipedia Carol Szathmari was the first combat photographer during the Crimean War (1853-1856). This was some years before the United States Civil War. Some technical information can be found at the Muzeul Naţional de Istorie a României At Wikipedia they mention also a ...


17

Fort Augustus was besieged on 3 March, 1746, and surrendered two days later. If not the absolute last, this was certainly one of the latest successful sieges in Britain. This followed an earlier action in December 1745 when Fort Augustus was captured by government-aligned militias. If we were to be picky about the name, the last successful siege of a placed ...


17

John D. Rockefeller Sr. was far and away the richest man in the world in 1937 at his death. But with the bulk of his wealth bequeathed to the Rockefeller (and other) foundations rather than to his son John D. Jr., that probably leaves Henry Ford the world's richest man in 1939. However Ford had suffered a number of strokes in the late 1930's, and when he ...


14

First contender: Battle of the Nile, 1 to 3 August 1798: Alerted to this fact, the Royal Navy gave Rear Admiral Horatio Nelson fifteen ships of the line with orders to locate and destroy the French fleet supporting Napoleon's forces. On August 1, 1798, following weeks futile searching, Nelson finally located the French transports at Alexandria. Though ...


14

During the Battle of Cochin in 1504, a Calicut fleet consisting of some 160 vessels attacked the numerically much fewer, but technologically vastly more advanced Portuguese force. Both sides lashed their ships together. From Wikipedia, on the Portuguese side, Duarte Pacheco Pereira: . . . ordered the long sharpened poles drilled deep mid-channel and ...


13

The first capture of a photograph was the first major historical event photographed (though it was photographed by implication rather than directly: you can't see it in the photograph).


13

The Book of Rites, in a chapter on Touhu, records an apparently complete composition for drums. Known as the Lu Drums (魯鼓) or the Xue Drums (薛鼓), it seems to be intended for a match of the semi-ritualistic game of pitch-pot. This is considered the oldest extant musical score in Chinese history. As the image shows, it uses very simple notations consisting of ...


12

Battle of Gaugamela in 331 BC between Alexander and Darius III's Persians. One of Alexande's great victories. Even if we take the highest estimate for Alexander's casualties (1,500) and the lowest for Darius III's army (40,000), it still gives a ratio of 26.67 to 1. Battle of Carrhae in 53 BC between the Romans and the Parthians. This is the famous battle ...


11

Seikilos epitaph is a Greek song which is the oldest complete musical composition. It's dated to be from 200 BC - 100 AD, with first century AD being the more plausible guess. You can Google it to listen to many different versions. Also refer to the older musical compositions section of the same article which states that there are might a few other older ...


11

Assuming we're not restricted to Christian rulers: Muhammad I (Ibn al-Ahmar), 1195-1273, the first Nasrid Sultan of Granada (part of modern-day Spain) lived ~78 years. Nominally he was an on-and-off vassal of Castile, but other than paying tribute he was de facto a sovereign monarch. During his lifetime, all other Muslim states in Spain got conquered by the ...


10

The oldest I know of is the destruction of Hamoukar in Syria. In 2005, archaeologists reported finding "collapsed mud-brick walls that had undergone heavy bombardment and ensuing fire" dating to around 3500 B.C. You can read more about the discovery here.


10

I think this is rather common. Just a few that I can think of off the top of my head are: Basil I, born to peasants, he was still a peasant in the mid 830s, but by 867 he was sole ruler of the Byzantine empire. Maximinius Thrax, born not only a peasant but also a non-Roman until the edict of Caracalla. Joined army as recruit, within 10 years was ...


10

Tsushima 1905. 117 vs 4380 dead. Fleet engagement, so the Japanese + Russian numbers of men, combined, probably were over your 10k threshold, but that 4380 looks like it was most of Russian fleet. The Invicible Armada lost 15000 men in 1588, but most of that was also due to weather on the retreat trip around Scotland. English losses were about 400. The ...


10

1988 - Battle of Afabet Fought between an Eritrean People's Liberation Front (EPLF) force of around 15,000 and an Ethiopian army numbering 20 to 25,000, this was a huge defeat for the latter. Ethiopian casualties were over 18,000 killed or captured while EPLF casualties amounted to only 394 (125 killed, 269 wounded, giving a ratio of at least 45 to 1. ...


9

For the record, in terms of modern sporting events, the earliest recorded international sporting event is said to be a cricket match which was played between the United States of America versus the British Empire's Canadian Province in 1844: It is one of cricket's curiosities that the oldest international rivalry is not, as many assume, England against ...


9

The obvious answer is the ancient Olympic Games, first established in 776 BC (according to legend), when Herakles1, Paeonaeus, Epimedes, Iasius and Idas raced at Olympia to honour Zeus. Olympia has been a site of religious activity since as early as the 10th century BC: Extensive deposits filled with ash and votive offerings from the sanctuary of Olympia ...


9

Not an exact fit, but Emperor Renzhong of Song came close with 16 children known to history. All three sons and eight of the daughters died young, so he eventually had to adopt the son of a cousin to succeed him. Though five of his princesses survived to adulthood, they were not considered heirs under Chinese succession laws. In that sense, Renzhong was ...


8

SHORT ANSWER This would most likely be the Mexcian - American War (1846-48). In particular, there is an 1847 picture showing what may be the first amputation photographed. DETAILS Although the first photo dates back to 1826 or 1827 (see picture here), it took many years to solve the problem of the long exposure time needed (up to 8 hours for early photos)....


8

The Mesoamerican Ballgame was played in more-ancient times than the Grecian games (1600 BCE) - but there is not a strong opinion about whether it was played as an inter-nation event in such ancient times. Certainly, for the Aztecs, the ballgame had a ritual significance, also we know that their conduct of ritual was a political stage that hierarchically ...


8

The deadliest road accident not caused by an explosion that I could find took place in Sotouboua, Togo in 1965, where two trucks crashed into a crowd of dancers, killing 125 people. While this is widely reported on many "Deadliest Road Accident" lists (such as this one) the only contemporary source that I could find for it is the 1965 edition of Africa Diary ...


8

Two contenders from West Africa Jerry Rawlings - Ghana: from junior air force officer on death row to Head of State in a few days. Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings (later known as ‘Junior Jesus’ to his supporters) was an unknown but charismatic 31-year-old fighter pilot when he took part in an attempted coup on 15 May 1979. Court-martialled together with ...


7

Though not more then 12 battles but Ypres had "only" 6 significant battles over a much smaller front then Isonzo. Though if you would count all smaller battles/offensives then you'll get a way bigger number. None of the smaller offensives are documented (well) on Wikipedia. And I'm unwilling to add them without reliable sources. All battles were along a ...


7

The purpose of the drawbridge was to deny access to the castle gate. As such, spanning large distances was not usually necessary, at least by the drawbridge itself. The still-operational drawbridges at Helmingham Hall are a good example: The moat is up to 18m wide by 1.8m deep. Each bridge crosses it with three spans — a central 9.6m cast iron span ...


7

The British History Online website has several pages taken from the Survey of London about Golden Square which may have the information you're looking for. There is an overview of the history and development of the square. This includes a plan of the square and does list some famous residents. A history and list of occupiers of the properties on the west ...


6

This website suggests that it was competition from the growing aviation industry that spurred development of higher speed trains in the 1930's. There also are inferences in OP's site link that advances in track technology were the driving factor in the higher attained speeds starting in the mid-1930's; not advances in the locomotives themselves. Note that ...


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