Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
53

The claim comes from Machiavelli, and, for example, this site criticizes it. In this case, Machiavelli was arguing in favor of training militias instead of using mercenary forces. A similar case is Battle of Anghiari, where it is claimed that only one man died. This Wikipedia article offers some explanations: The casualties were indeed light, as condottieri ...


44

In principle, yes. But it is not the 1943 Westinghouse poster of a "Rosie the Riveter"-like figure captioned "We Can Do It!" by J. Howard Miller that became conflated with "Rosie the Riveter" in postwar years but the painting by Norman Rockwell from 1943: The pose in the Rockwell painting does look a lot like the pose Michelangelo chose to display the ...


22

It appears that the author, Margrit Kennedy, has either misunderstood or is deliberately misrepresenting the situation with Medieval bracteates. Medieval bracteates (a form of pennies) are pieces of thin silver sheet embossed on one side. They typically have a diameter of between 22 and 45 mm. Because it is struck on only one side, the coin image appears in ...


22

Since the author served in the Royal Navy, a logical place to start would be the British National Archives. Much of their records have fortunately been digitalised and can be searched online - including service registers from the early 20th century. A search of the officers' service records reveal a Lieutenant Commander Richard Travers Chaloner Woods, born ...


16

The chronicles Beishi 北史 "History of the North" and Nanshi 南史 "History of the South" have at least some of what you are looking for. The Nanshi chronicle mentions frost and snow. This is cited in Catastrophe: An Investigation into the Origins of the Modern World by David Keys: In July 537 China was hit by frost, while in August it snowed. The History ...


13

Quite the opposite, he's arguing that "savage" societies give women higher status (from our modern point of view). I think its important to understand that this was written by a man who benefitted from sitting comfortably in the upper rungs of Victorian (technically actually Georgian) English society. He's not talking about modern western women with (on ...


12

It seems unlikely that the 1966 incident could have resulted in the nuclear explosion of one or more of the four hydrogen bombs that fell at Palomares, and I am not aware of any serious claims to the contrary. Some background documentation The 1975 summary report on the Palomares Incident has been declassified and is available as a pdf file on Archive.org....


10

Mostly to supervise the enforcement of ceasefire and peace terms. Polish involvement began in 1954 as a member of the International Commission of Control, together with Canada and India. That entity was setup at the conclusion of the First Indochina War to monitor the peace agreement. It was a general failure all around, resulting in the Second Indochina ...


10

These records have been commercially available in print since 1967, when it was published under the title Haisen no Kiroku (敗戦の記録, lit. Records of Defeat) by Hara Shobo. This included materials spanning from March 1944 to late 1945. Here is an Amazon.jp link to a 2005 edition. A related publication is the Sugiyama Memos (杉山メモ), written by General Sugiyama ...


9

The main descriptions of the abnormal weather is found as mentioned in the other answers from the 北史/南史 beishi/nanshi which mentions snow in September and August respectively. As for the highlighted quote I've managed to track it down to a passage in the 资治通鉴第一百五十七卷 Zizhi Tongjian 157th Juan (13th chapter in the Liang Dynasty sections). The original texts ...


9

You are asking about "Ausländerkinder-Pflegestätte", though many other terms where used. Pflegestätten were established after a decree by Heinrich Himmler in 1943. The children where separated, shortly after birth, from their mothers so the mothers could return to their forced labor. The babies would be kept in abysmal conditions with systematic ...


8

The “We Can Do it” poster was only seen by Westinghouse Employees as W.H. had hired their own in-house artist. His posters would be displayed for two weeks and then replaced with another of his designs. The posters were eventually donated to the Smithsonian. Rockwell’s painting was only known as the Rosie, admittedly based off of the Michelangelo painting ...


7

I suspect that the podcast may be referring to published research by Robert Allen of Oxford University. In his 2006 paper Explaining The British Industrial Revolution From the Perspective of Global Wage and Price History. Professor Allen observes: In Britain, wages were remarkably high and energy cheap. This wage and price history was a fundamental reason ...


6

Here's a couple quotes from a 1932 article in Foreign Affairs called "Hitler: Phenomenon and Portent". This was written by Paul Scheffer, the Washington correspondent of a German newspaper called Berliner Tageblatt. The newspaper was shut down by the Nazis in 1939. Hitler's adversaries are right in charging that such an audience can easily be misused. ...


6

I would like to conglomerate some of the supposed events here, as given from the primary historical sources from 《北史》 (History of the Northern Dynasties) and 《南史》 (History of the Southern Dynasties). The date conversions given in the footnotes are based on the website 兩千年中西曆轉換. All translations given are my own. 《北史》 (History of the Northern Dynasties) ...


6

There is a vast amount of literature covering the period you are interested in. What follows is but a small sample, but it should set you on your way. The following ancient sources cover 5th century BC Athens. They are not specifically about the daily lives and culture of Athenians but there is much to be gleaned from them. Plutarch's Parallel Lives, ...


5

Unfortunately, the Italian Wikipedia page doesn't cite a source for its claim. I'm certainly not aware of any securely-dated thimbles from Roman contexts here in the UK. I did a keyword search on reports of small finds from Pompeii and Herculaneum, but couldn't find any mention of thimbles there either. I found a number of sites that repeat the claim of ...


5

You can read PDFs of all US censuses since 1790 on the US Census website. If the PDF's are a problem, Wikipedia keeps pages for all of them too, with nice modern HTML graphs rather than scans. Here's the one for 1790. The grand total was a bit under 4 Million.


5

Brakeaten money was a form of seigneurage in the late Middle Ages. The term is German because it was practiced in most parts of Germany. What it means is that the sovereign, from time to time, issued new coins, forcing people to exchange their old metal coins for new ones, with the sovereign "taxing" this process by keeping say, one new coin out of four. ...


4

I suspect that most of the personal virtues in the list were extracted from the Conspiracy of Catiline, by the Roman Historian Gaius Sallustius Crispus. He defined a number of what he though of as typical Republican Roman virtues. He went on to argue that they were in the process of being corrupted because of the influx of wealth. However, I don't think ...


4

Thucydides and Xenophon. And if you can sacrifice some credibility for entertainment, Herodotus. Also, not historians but I really recommend reading Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides to get a grasp of their world. Modern historians specialized in Ancient Greece I've only read Donald Kagan and Luciano Canfora. EDIT: Wikipedia Category ...


4

It seems to be related to a tale told of Domitian, who was reacting to a prophecy concerning his death. From The History of the Roman Emperors: From Augustus to Constantine, Volume 6 (original French) by Jean Baptiste Louis Crevier (emphasis mine) He took a farther precaution to guard against any unexpected attack. A stone was found in Nero's time in ...


3

On my opinion, the best description of daily life can be obtained from some Russian fiction. Especially I recommend the short stories of Michail Zoshchenko (many of them are translated into English). Zoshchenko was enormously popular with Soviet people whose daily life he described, but was persecuted by the authorities at the later stage of his life. Other ...


3

For a list of Royal Navy officers, you need to consult the Navy List. Many volumes of that are available on Archive.org; start with the latest one before 1936, and work backwards from there. It is also worth trying his name in Google without the R.N., and that will lead you to his full name. I haven't found much else, though.


3

I think you'd be very interested in the ideas of Douglas S. Robertson in The New Renaissance: Computers and the Next Level of Civilization. The chapter of the book relevant to this discussion is available free online from CNN.* The basic thesis is that human civilizations are inherently information-limited. With this insight, we can sort civilizations into ...


2

The classic text that comes to mind is The Invention of Tradition (1983), edited by Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger. It is a collection of essays that explore how nationalism developed in various (primarily British) contexts. It argues that collective identity is not something natural, but rather is manufactured. It may, though, fall short of what you seek ...


2

In Hitler's time in Vienna, there's evidence that Hitler had close relationships with some Jews and at least one Czech (his landlord), and the only eye-witness accounts we have of xenophobia in Hitler's early Viennese period come after the proliferation of anti-Czech rhetoric in the 1890s by the Pan-German Party, among others. From this, it's arguably clear ...


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