9

There was a plan for an invited British invasion of Ireland IF the Germans invaded, called Plan W. And although officially neutral Ireland did give some assistance to Britain in terms of allowing overflights by Atlantic patrol aircraft and returning British and allied aircraft and crew that were forced to make emergency landings.


8

Both Germany and Great Britain had plans to invade Ireland. Germany couldn't launch such an attack as they lacked the naval power to do it, as they knew that the Royal Navy would intervene. For the same reason they never tried to invade Great Britain, an invasion of Ireland would have been even more difficult due to the distances involved, they would have ...


3

The best barometer we have of the attitude of the general population of the Irish Free State towards the Anglo-Irish Treaty are the "Pact Elections" of 16 June 1922. They occurred twelve days before the commencement of hostilities in the Irish Civil War. As the linked Wikipedia article points out, 75% percent of the electorate supported pro-Treaty parties. ...


3

It could be because he pretty much laid low and took it easy during that time. I'd suggest looking over local Irish newspapers and legal documents for the period in question. Much like a geneology researcher would do. A paying account at ancestory.com might help with that. However, you do have to be careful with that site. They allow user content, but ...


3

Germany did in fact attempt to stir up unrest in Ireland, as seen by this BBC article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/3264257.stm The MI5 documents show that three men who landed on the southern coast of Ireland in 1940 were found with four bombs hidden inside cans labelled "French peas". The saboteurs claimed they were for use against ...


2

Northern Ireland Prime Minister Lord Craigavon had asked Churchill in 1940 to invade the Republic of Ireland at the height of the war, as he felt that Valera was coming under the influence of Hitler. Churchill did not move at that time but later prepared detailed plans for an invasion of southern Ireland. Field Marshal Montgomery stated in his ...


2

If Hitler had conquered Great Britain, I think that they would have also invaded Ireland afterwards. Germany, despite its promises, did have plans to invade Switzerland and Sweden after defeating all other European countries, so I think Ireland would have suffered a similar fate. During the War, however, it simply did not have any importance or significance (...


2

Ireland was a de facto ally of Britan. It had heavy trade ties with Britain and supplied it with volunteer soldiers and mercenaries. Irish industrial production came to Britain and ships under Irish flag transported British goods without a risk of being attacked. Conversely, forcing conscription of Irish population could lead to a pro-Germany unrest. That ...


1

I knew someone (long dead) who lived near his wife's relatives in Dublin. It was always said he drank heavily, never worked and after dying in a bar it emerged he had no money. His children had to be taken out of school and (I think) the family lost everything. He was generally held to be a con man. The person I knew always disliked him but only realised ...


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