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22

Since the author served in the Royal Navy, a logical place to start would be the British National Archives. Much of their records have fortunately been digitalised and can be searched online - including service registers from the early 20th century. A search of the officers' service records reveal a Lieutenant Commander Richard Travers Chaloner Woods, born ...


18

You may want to check the cour des miracles (court of miracles) as a real life example of a "thieves guild". Clearly reading about the Mafia, Tong, and Yakuza should be compulsory as those are crime organisations. Look at your local law enforcement web site for further information on organised crime as well if you are looking for more modern organisations.


14

Loki and Hermes are well-known gods of thievery. As for saints, St. Nicolas is the patron of thieves. As for clans, often there was some community of people that had any normal work forbidden by the society or some inner rules. Some opressed small nation could choose non-collaboration policy and crime remained their only way of living. Gipsies or ...


10

There is a picture of that oracle bone in the chapter Chinese and Korean Star Maps and Catalogs by F. Richard Stephenson in the University of Chicago's History of Cartography (p514): There is also a sketch of the bone, together with a brief discussion of the inscription on pp 3-4 of The Astronomy Revolution: 400 Years of Exploring the Cosmos by Donald G. ...


9

Theory of history is so closely related to "historiography" or the practice of writing and criticising history that we may as well consider them to be basically coaligned. Therefore you will want to read EH Carr's "What is History?" and a textbook aimed at honours / post-graduate coursework students on historiography. Ranke started modern history with the ...


8

The first thing that came to my mind reading your question certainly is data storage and retrieval. History often is a lot of documents. Databases can be immensely helpful for storing, accessing, and cross-referencing large piles of (historical) data, and complex algorithms can be used to analyze such data. Computer analysis can also be very helpful in ...


8

Interesting series of questions, but I'm afraid I don't have an answer to all of them. I'll answer the language-related in order to set them into context. It's very hard to read the the last line of the fist picture and I can only see: "[Anteque]ra que vinieron XXX con Señor XXX Don Fernando" The word you mention in your second question is not "...


8

The one people seem to be drawing on a lot (I found two recent articles about it) was the raid on Donald Manno in 2008.* The better of the two was here on Reuters. In 2008, Manno’s law office was raided by federal investigators pursuing a racketeering case against a suspected mobster who was a client and friend of the lawyer. The FBI copied Manno’s ...


7

The answer is a big "oh yes, definitely". And not just the Pyramids, Geophysics is a standard technique in modern archaeology. Just some random things discovered with geophys: The Staffordshire Hoard. Plumbing at Petra. The location and layout of Athelney Abbey. A temple complex at Saqqara.


7

Matters of language are probably best handled elsewhere, so I'll try to answer the question that I think is answer-able here: How can my family preserve this artifact? It is right to understand that this book is a book of title. Internal Affairs First, your assertions that this belongs in a museum are very-evidently part of your friction with those ...


7

I don't know how useful this will be to you but hopefully these links will at least lead you to what you are looking for. The British Library has more than 450 oracle bones and there are some links on the page, such as a pdf catalog and digitized manuscripts. You could write them and ask if these have translations to view and they should know where you can ...


5

Although I'm not an expert in the field, it is my understanding that we would not be able to reach much of the Dead Sea Scrolls without modern image processing. (And in the absence of digitization the documents would be available to a far smaller group of scholars). And only recent image processing has revealed the secret of the subject smear, which is a ...


5

As sbi noted, relational databases can be used for analyzing historical data. A specific example comes from the scholarly work The First Crusaders, 1095-1131 by renowned crusade scholar Jonathan Riley-Smith. This book focuses on studying the first generation of crusaders. In the introduction Riley-Smith explains how he used an Oracle database to store basic ...


5

Until the present case, what was the most significant or consequent of these actions in the United States? I don't know about most significant consequences, but I'll note the idea has been around for at least a century. United States v Clark (1933) references the limits of attorney-client privilege while dealing with the limits of juror privilege. Long ...


5

Woodburn Heron's own research seem to have been less notable then that of his mentor, Hebb. But "The Pathology of Boredom" was published in Scientific American, a popular magazine which is much more accessible to the general public than learned academic journals. This probably explains why Heron is so widely quoted. Woodburn Heron seems to have spent a ...


4

Bernard "Woody" Woodburn-Heron was my stepfather. He was related to the Manchester Parish Herons. His mother was Edith Ethel Heron (#66iii in the attached genealogy) http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Members/rheron.htm He grew up at Spitzbergen near Walderston, a house I remember well. (Will Robson has other photos) http://www.will-robson.com/keyword/...


3

The prominent attorney Lynne Stewart had her records raided in 2002 over her work with Omar Abdel-Rahman, the "Blind Sheik" linked to the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the 1997 Luxor massacre. Her contact with her client was subject to special administrative measures that she may not have honored. Prosecutors believed she was relaying messages between ...


3

For a list of Royal Navy officers, you need to consult the Navy List. Many volumes of that are available on Archive.org; start with the latest one before 1936, and work backwards from there. It is also worth trying his name in Google without the R.N., and that will lead you to his full name. I haven't found much else, though.


3

Not all manuscripts are actually manuscripts. It depends on the cataloguing that the archivist, librarian or records officer has done. Often manuscript is used as a short-hand for any original documentation produced. Typescripts are relatively recent additions, and are often incorrectly referred to as manuscripts. Correspondingly, "mimeo" "xerography" "...


3

I'd also do some research into Tammany Hall particularly under the guidance of the infamous William "Boss" Tweed. While more of an example of political corruption than outright organized property crime, it is a very illustrative example of the interplay between criminals and public officials. In this particular example the line between the two became very ...


2

I have degrees in Informatics and Cognitive Sciences (which is a mixture of sciences but traditionally not yet the "history faculty"). I had this discussion 15 years ago with persons from the history faculty and the first thing I think of is ofcourse Asimov and Harry Seldon) I read this as "can we pull the history faculty in cognitive science" I think this ...


2

I'll separate my answer into two: ancient history and modern history. Ancient history Personally, I think the most interesting and very "new" field is the use of DNA analysis to study ancient human migrations. See for example the Wikipedia article Models of migration to the New World and Mitochondrial Eve. This field uses information that has survived up ...


2

Attempts to produce quantitative history, ie cliometrics within Economic history; may make more computationally intensive demands than traditional text interpretation. This kind of economic history is not viewed as a core element of the discipline. The computational requirements are probably computationally boring from a theoretical perspective; and, ...


2

It is a little surprising to me that what I think is currently the relevant example has not been mentioned so far (this may be due to the fact that what has been called a "breakthrough" in the press happened well after the OP): reading the Herculaneum papyri. It will not be possible for me to summarize what this is about in detail, yet I think it is ...


2

It's a fascinating question. One of the greatest contributions of computer science to the study of history is the fact that people created computer science, which is based on logic. There is quite a long process between the invention of logic, and it's encoding into the physical realm through machine logic. This fact sheds a bright light on your search for ...


2

Generally, I believe the best place to find old copies of city newspapers is in the archives of the city in question's Public Library. I know mine has every back issue of the two major local papers (at one time we had two) on microfiche, and perhaps in more modern forms now as well. So I'd think the best place to look would be the Richmond Public Library. ...


2

There are some letter archives from WWI: http://www.u.arizona.edu/~rstaley/wwlettr1.htm http://www.ourecho.com/story-1716-LETTERS-FROM-A-SOLDIER-WWI.shtml http://soldierswills.nationalarchives.ie/search/sw/index.jsp http://www.petergknight.com/warletters.html http://www.canadianletters.ca/collections.php?warid=3 http://www.smythe.id.au/letters/ http://...


2

Thanks to the author, Glenn Farris, I obtained a copy of "Report on a Project to seek out documents describing early 19th Century California housed in the Russian Naval Archives in St. Petersburg, Russia". It contains a translation of a 2005 letter from the director of the Russian Naval Archive (RGAVMF), Vladimir Semenovich Sobolev, who describes the archive'...


1

Do you recall the scene where Senri was restricted with some greyish Michelin looking body suit? That was probably her undergoing the experiment that Woodburn Heron devised. Woodburn Heron was examining how our human brains would cope in the event of sensory deprivation, basically with our senses blocked, how would we react. His participants were made to ...


1

From following the references at Wikipedia, I found The Lost History of the Transistor. Which led me to How Europe Missed The Transistor, which, seems to suggest that France or Germany could have been the first creators of the transistor... Two physicists from the German radar program, Herbert Mataré and Heinrich Welker ... German Efforts: Everything ...


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