30

I was referring to Alexei Isaev's book Antisuvorov (Russian). He lists a bunch of falsifications in the preface of his book. First example is Suvorov's quoting of colonel S. Hvalei's book (approximate translation): It happened that the division was immediately behind the frontier posts at the start of the war, meaning right next to the state border. ...


25

In the Greek and Roman Era there were a number of sources in Europe tapped for gold.. These were often alluvial (alluvium is loose soil or sediment, usually around water) deposits near the mouths of rivers in Lydia, Greece, Egypt, and Asia Minor. Later more standard mines were found in the Balkans. Rome found similar river deposits in North Italy, Spain, ...


17

Half the Old World's gold around the medieval period came from Mali Empire. Credit to many hours playing Civilisation 4 as Mansa Musa for knowing this one!


14

In short, no. With no knowledge of sedimentary processes, chemistry of ores, or continental-shelf subduction, the ancients were completely dependent on surface geology for location of ore bodies. However, this was not usually a limiting factor - given that the world population only hit 200 million during the Roman Republic, and 500 million in the 15th ...


11

According to wikipedia, Steel has been around since antiquity, but reference to steel weapons can be found in 4th century BC Ibernia, Romans, and in Chinese references during their Warring States era. The steel that we think of today was originally made East Africa by the Haya people over two eons ago, but wouldn't be rediscovered until the Industrial ...


9

Well, people from the generation that grew up right after the war told their kids (including me) of the treasure trove of unexploded ammunition they came across as the kids. The stories included numerous kids loosing finger or getting burned by powder, as well as occasional fatal explosions. Some schools even invited explosives experts to tell the kids how ...


9

The Indochine war began after negotiations were suspended between the Viet-Minh and the French Republic in 1946 (the date is often the insurecction on the 19th december, but in fact, the French bombed Haiphong on the 23th november, some even trace it to the leave of General Leclerc, the military administrator, in 1946). The US involvement only began in 1954 ...


8

Here's a zoomed-in screenshot of a map I made using Harvard's Geospatial Library. As you can see in the left, the layer I chose was "Germany State Boundaries, 1914." The little exclave in the bottom center of the screen is Achberg. If you zoom in a little more, it is labeled, but I chose to stay a little further out so you could see the other exclaves. It's ...


7

I'm new to this topic so not a lot to offer. However, from what I've read it's the western historians who seem to dispute this theory of Hitler beating Stalin to the punch with the most verve. Some Russian historians do support Suvorov's hypothesis. In any revisionist look at WWII one must consider the political motivations of even allegedly unbiased ...


6

You can download Census microdata at IPUMS USA here: https://usa.ipums.org/usa/ Since a large number of births occurred to married women historically in the United States, you could also use completed birth parities by birth cohort of women for an estimation: cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/cohort_fertility_tables.htm


6

As you know from my answer to your earlier question, the best preserved tablets containing the standard Akkadian version of the Gilgameš Epic were discovered in the Library of Ashurbanipal in Nineveh by Hormuzd Rassam in 1853, and are now held in the British Museum. A number of those tablets are available as high-resolution images from the British Museum ...


5

According to wikipedia: The earliest known production of steel is a piece of ironware excavated from an archaeological site in Anatolia (Kaman-Kalehoyuk) and is about 4,000 years old. Other ancient steel comes from East Africa, dating back to 1400 BC. In the 4th century BC steel weapons like the Falcata were produced in the Iberian Peninsula, while Noric ...


5

The University of Marquette seems to have a lot of McCarthy material digitized and online. I believe they have even more material that isn't (yet?) digitized.


5

For the English longbow my research indicates that arrows were not made by one man or one at a time in the 16th century. They were mass produced with many craftsmen applying their talents to produce different components which only when assembled would be called an arrow. So the process wouldn't lend itself to be measured in time per arrow. The arrows ...


5

According to the UNESCO General History of Africa (vol 1), The ancient authors' information was scanty and fitful, especially in relation to West Africa. Herodotus, Manethon, the Elder Pliny, Strabo and some others tell us little more than of occasional journeys or raids across the Sahara, or of maritime tentatives down the Atlantic coast, and the ...


5

For that particular individual, if he was a serving RAF officer he would definitely have been debriefed on his return to the UK about his activities in France, before returning to active service. If the story of his involvement with the French Resistance is true, the there should absolutely be a record for it. Details of his activities with the Resistance ...


4

US Geological Survey has some publications which may be of interest to you. Here for example is the report on Copper. It lists prices in cents per pound every year from 1850 to 1998. Here is the same report for Aluminum. This one has many gaps tho, and only includes three prices before 1895. Edit: This publication appears to roll up all the other data ...


4

I believe you are looking for James Ward who is credited with writing the book, "Perils, Pastimes, and Pleasures of an Emigrant in Australia, Vancouver’s Island and California." (See: Perils, Pastimes, and Pleasures of an Emigrant in Australia, Vancouver’s Island and California). He is also mentioned on page 65 in a book called Gold Seeking: Victoria and ...


4

Originally, the question asked for a non-African source, which I interpreted as an account from someone who originally lived outside Africa. The question has now been refined to include any accounts outside of sub-Saharan Africa, which would include early Egyptian accounts and others such as the Egypt-dwelling Greek/Roman sources in Lars's answer. I won't ...


3

While the Vietnamese Communist Party had been involved in militant anti-French agitation from the early 1930s, and, while large number of Vientamese workers (including agricultural workers) and peasants had hungered for freedom from the French government—including its fish sauce tax—it was the elimination of the old party leadership by the Japanese in 1940/...


3

Based on documents reported on by The Telegraph, we now know that the USSR offered a million troops in an attempt to ally with Britain and France to take proactive measures against Germany before Molotov-Ribbentrop. That destroys Suvorov's thesis while explaining the USSR's preparation. Is the USSR had been successful in clinching the alliance the Nazis ...


3

I grabbed a couple sentences of the linked speech, tossed quotes around it and dropped it into a Google search. It spit back a link to Full text of "Adolf Hitler Collection Of Speeches 1922 1945" on archive.org. Unfortunately it doesn't have the original German text, but it seems to be a quite comprehensive collection. I'm guessing that if you have some ...


3

So far, I have discovered these (which I believe are compiled from the same sources): http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2236382 http://katyn.org.au/Lista_Katyn.pdf


3

As Michael says, people collect them as souvenirs. Military and other government agencies also collect them to prevent accidents. Even to this day farmers in Europe plow up munitions and other trash from WW1 and WW2 regularly, mines, torpedoes and aircraft bombs are dredged up in fishing nets and when dredging rivers and harbours to deepen and widen shipping ...


3

I'll add that the Carpathian mountains in Eastern Europe have been a very rich source of gold in the middle ages and before. The Roman conquering of Dacia in 106 AD - modern day Romania is said to have revitalized the Roman empire economy and prolonged its life by at least 100 years (160 metric tons of pure gold and 300 metric tons of silver were brought to ...


3

The Library of Congress has a search engine where you can search specifically for maps. E.g. the search term "1600" leads to some historical maps.


3

[OP here. Found the answer and will share for future generations with the same question.] In the book Historical Statistics of the United States, Colonial Times to 1970 published by the United States Census Bureau relevant information can be found in chapter M on minerals. In particular, page 582 and following pages contain information on historic prices ...


3

Buildings and structures panoramic of prague in the late 17th (source: old-prague.com) Workshops the only one i've been able to find is the misseroni workshop, in the 1630's, it was a stonecutrting and glasswork workshop. Their house is still there, but i don't know if it's the same. You could also research the 17th-century weapon workshops of Adam ...


3

Here is a chart of global literacy rates. Russia is toward the "bottom" (of developed countries), but still had a literacy rate of about 50% in 1900, rising sharply in the early 20th centuries. This put it above overall world levels. In 1900, "Poland" was (mostly) part of "Russia," but was one of the most developed parts of the country, so its literacy rate ...


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