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35

Plutarch's Lives says this about Marcus Cato: He would likewise say ... and that in his whole life he most repented of three things; one was, that he had trusted a secret to a woman; another, that he went by water when he might have gone by land; the third, that he had remained one whole day without doing any business of moment.


9

He's probably talking about structures like this one at Senam Semana in Roman Tripolitania: You can see the superficial resemblance to the Stonehenge trilithons: image source Wikimedia CC BY-SA 3.0 de So it is, perhaps, understandable that nineteenth-century travellers in north‐west Libya took them to be prehistoric megaliths and assumed they were of ...


7

"Pretense" and "Fiction" are certainly the right words for it. Nobody really bought into it at the time (except the Roman Senate, at knife-point), and I wouldn't suggest we do so now. The ruler of the Eastern Roman Empire Zeno made it clear he felt Julius Nepos was the rightful ruler of the West until his death in 480. He didn't accept Odacter or his puppet ...


5

NO. The Roman army was made up of "professional" soldiers, who served 25 years (from their late teens to their early 40s, like modern ball players), before they were disbanded. No medieval armies had soldiers of this standing, although the Kommenians came closer than others. This started after the Punic Wars, when cheap grain acquired from Sicily (and ...


5

It would be very difficult to define a meaningful general average, especially without more clearly defined parameters. As @Mark-C-Wallace has explained, the sizes of individual balneum varied widely. Their popularity and availability would have depended on where (the city of Rome itself, or the wider empire) and when (Roman bath culture spanned centuries) ...


4

Depends on the size of the balneum, the size of the community, and the number of competitors. "Small bathhouses, called balneum (plural balnea), might be privately owned, while they were public in the sense that they were open to the populace for a fee. " Wikipedia "These Roman baths varied from simple to exceedingly elaborate structures, and they varied ...


2

Long time ago I wondered about the same. I always thought the Roman army (early imperial, of course) would beat the crap out of any opponent until the end of the middle ages. After learning a lot about history I had to change my opinion completely. No. 1: The Roman army was entirely professional. From the lowest recruit up to generals in command. Medieval ...


2

I'm not an expert on Roman military tactics, so I don't know how accurate this is, and they don't mention or link any specific scholarly sources, but I found a youtube video from an educational account about this. Hopefully someone who knows about this stuff can comment on its reliability, but they have rather a lot of historical videos of this kind of stuff,...


1

The Wikipedia article on the Gothic War explains a lot of the situation revolving around the status of Italy under the Goths and the reason the Eastern Roman Empire decided to invade. As I understand the issue, Odoacer legalized his position as you said by acting as a vassal of the Eastern Roman Emperor. But Zeno was mistrustful of Odoacer and sent Theodoric ...


1

It is entirely possible to find ancient Greeks and Romans discussing this very matter. My amateur opinion is that it was sort of a favorite parlor game to try to map the gods of one civilization to those of another, and maybe discover new ones. I'll provide several examples of this from Herodotus. People are pretty skeptical of Herodotus in terms of factual ...


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