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33

This has been quoted a few times, in slight variation, like here, with attribution indeed to Disraeli: — Harry Blamires: "The Victorian Age of Literature", Longman literature guides, Longman, 1988. p10 (gBooks) And used here as well: He [Prince Albert] never became really popular with the aristocracy or the working man, but it was otherwise with ...


28

When Peter 'upgraded' the Russian title of 'tsar' (царь) to 'emperor' (император), this meant that the corresponding titles would have to be given a similar jump upwards. The specific issue arose because the Westernized 'emperor', though sharing its root with the Slavonized 'tsar' in the Latin 'caesar', was a more important title than that of tsar, the two ...


19

No. there is no evidence to backup this claim. Like it says on Wikipedia: The Countess frequently appeared in men's clothing and even in military uniform. Some sources alleged that August the Strong made his own daughter his favorite; however, this cannot be proved. It was a rumor going around at the time. She was apparently of exceptional beauty and had ...


14

Prior to the adoption of Mountbatten in February 1947, Prince Philip did not use a surname. In the navy during World War II, he was known as HRH Prince Philip. Thus, while serving as First Lieutenant on HMS Wallace (Oct. 1942 to Jan. 1944), he was Lt HRH Prince Philip, RN. He was also referred to as Sub-Lieutenant Prince Philip of Greece in the 12th of ...


7

Revised the fifth time about 11:17 PM, EST, saturdayy 03-20-2021. Short Answer: The evidence I found indicates that the record age to beat for the youngest monarch to become a father is 12 years, though there are possibilities of younger ones. Long Answer: Part One of Twelve: Some of the Problems and Difficulties: That is a difficult question to answer ...


5

I think the best answer would be the youngest reigning male monarch with a baby Eric II of Norway (reigned 1280 to 1299) was 14 or 15 when his daughter Margaret, Maid of Norway was born in March or April, 1283. Father: Eric II, born 1268 (month unknown) Mother: Margaret of Scotland, born 28 Feb, 1261 Married in 1281 Daughter: Margaret, Maid of Norway, born ...


5

Correct Everything you say appears 100% correct. The current royal family are from the house of Windsor, though this is a name they adopted due to anti-german sentiment in Britain. The house had previously been a German house named "Saxe Coburg Gotha". House of Windsor, wikipedia The House of Windsor is the reigning royal house of the United ...


4

It looks like there has been an incorrect answer (Richard II) to this question up for years and missing the mark by centuries. The last king of England (of Great Britain, actually, of which England was a part) who spoke French as his first language was George II. According to Andrew Thompson's George II: King and Elector, p. 16, referring to George II, &...


4

I think that the interpretation of the statement as extremely aristocratic lords looking down upon Queen Victoria and the royal family as persons of lower status is rather unlikely to be the correct one. Instead such statements more probably refer to her ability to keep in touch with the opinions of the middle class. Many of the noble titles in England go ...


3

Does a crown have to be a gold or silver crown with jewels, or can it be made of other materials, so long as it represents authority? In the latter case, it would be very hard to tell the difference between fancy hats and hatlike crowns. Ancient Egyptian crowns came in many designs and weren't always made out of metal. In fact the materials they are made of ...


3

Yes, the kings of England are traditionally numbered post-conquest. Additionally, monarchs who held England and another country in personal union are often given both numbers, like James VI/I, James II/VII, less commonly Henry VI/II, and (more controversially, as he didn't hold both kingdoms at the same time) Louis I/VIII. Order of the numbers is primarily ...


2

The Dynasty that ruled England from 1154 to 1485 is called the Plantagenet Dynasty. The first king of that dynasty, Henry II, was the son of Geoffry, Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy, and Matilda of England. Count Geoffry had the nickname of Plantagenet. Centuries later, in the 15th century, members of the Plantagenet dynasty started to use Plantagenet ...


2

There was the rulers of the Gupta Empire. As I said in a previous answer, the empire existed from 3rd century A.D. and 550 A.D & the main dominant 'religion' of the empire was a nontheistic branch of Hinduism called classical Mimamsa that believes the gods only exist as ideas, not real beings, and doing rituals/social duties are how one lives a better ...


2

Here's my suggestion for numbering the Anglo-Saxon kings Edward in future writing. Edward the Elder could be called "Edward the First or the Minus Second", Edward the Martyr could be called "Edward the Second or the Minus oneth", and edward the Cnfessor could be called "Edward the Third or the Zeroth". And there numerals can ...


1

It's pretty dubious that crowns were around. The oldest crowns go back to the Archaemid Persian Empire founded by Cyrus the Great, & it was only with the adoption by Constantine I of a crown as symbol of the Holy Roman Emperor, that they attained their modern sense. Annointing with oils is probably the oldest symbol of attaining special rank, & is ...


1

Here is a little gem that I discovered from the Wikipedia data dump from user:Pere @Pere https://history.stackexchange.com/users/21213/pere King Tribhuvan of Nepal (b. 30 June 1906) Queen Kanti of Nepal (b. 5 July 1906) married March 1919 (ages 12, 12) (He also married her older sister the same day) son Mahendra of Nepal (b. 11 June 1920) AGES 13, 13 at ...


1

I'm not giving an answer but I'd like to bring in some data. I've run a query on Wikidata and there are a lot of monarchs not very older than their children. The query is at https://w.wiki/37EU However, there are some problems: In spite of having filtered off the parents younger than their children, a lot of errors remain. I suspect most of those errors are ...


1

843 AD According to Wikipedia (right hand side of article) the foundation of Scotland was 843AD. Scotland, Wikipedia Established 9th century (traditionally 843) Kenneth MacAlpin The king during this period is widely believed to have been Kenneth MacAlpin, as you have already expressed. Kenneth MacAlpin, Wikipedia Kenneth MacAlpin (Medieval Gaelic: Cináed ...


1

Muslim monarchies generally don’t rely on any divine mandate or right, just pragmatic concerns (i.e. obeying the ruler is the best way to preserve peace and ensure God’s laws are implemented). The ruler is expected to apply the divine law (Shari’ah) but this is a duty on the ruler and a condition for his legitimacy rather than vice versa. Generally, Muslim ...


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