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A simple answer is: Soviets had barely the same plan for an all-out nuclear war. In the 50s, Soviets as well as Americans had a very lazy perception on nuclear weapons: one general wanted to use nuclear bombs over China's border, and tactical nuclear weapons were developed like the Davy Crockett. In the end, the Mutual Assured Destruction doctrine was ...


6

Some of this history is still controversial (namely, the actual location of Sarkel). Following is what I have extracted from the book S. Pletneva, "Essays on Khazar archeology," ("Очерки хазарской археологии") Jerusalem, 1999, that was written mostly on the basis of archeological excavations, namely, Artamonov's expedition (Artamonov was Pletneva's PhD ...


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Sviatoslav I destroyed Sarkel. He built a settlement there called Bela Vezha, "white tower". This lasted until the Cumans, who then used it as a winter campground.


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They were the people who did not fit in any of the traditional strata of feudal society Russian society in the period you mentioned was roughly divided in four groups: nobility, clergy, peasants (serfs) and city(town) dwellers (merchants, craftsmen, etc ...). This is largely similar to other feudal European societies up to 19th century. Raznochintsy were ...


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There is no good season for invasion of Russia Napoleon and Hitler invaded in the beginning of the summer. Weather in this part of the year is relatively good for advance, and Russian roads are passable. Napoleon went straight to Moscow and captured it relatively early in the year ( September 14, 1812). However, he did not capture Kiev and his army could ...


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What you have here is one instance of a larger question: why do English speakers (and I presume speakers of other languages*) often use different names for foreign countries than the inhabitants of those countries do? For instance: Spain/España, Germany/Deutschland, Finland/Suomi, Japan/Nihon… "Russia" is in fact exactly how (most) English speakers ...


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And in general, the Russians pronounce their country as RAssia. This is true, but (unlike English) they put the stress on the second syllable, so the first vowel becomes a schwa-like sound. 'rasSIa' would be a better representation for those of us (myself included) who don't regular use IPA. English is a rather unique language in many senses, one of them ...


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