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You might want to look into the reasons why the Roman empire did not expand (much) beyond the Rhine and Donau rivers. Or did not conquer Scotland. Certainly the area between the Rhine and Vistula rivers (most of today's Germany and a good part of Poland) would have made a nice addition to the imperium, and there actually were military threats from that area, ...


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Everyone else has been saying that this is not a court dress. I disagree. I feel that to understand the dress you must understand the person wearing it. The portrait is of Nadezhda Polovtsova (patronymic Mikhailovna, surname based on the word June, Iyuneva Yianina) the bastard daughter of Mikhail Pavloviche, the brother of Emperor Nicholas I. She was left ...


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Harsh Siberia and even harsher Cossacks When we talk about Siberia, first thing we notice is that this huge area is very sparsely populated, both today and in history. This is not without the reason. Climate in Siberia is harsh, with relatively short summers and long, cold winters. As a result, classical agriculture with grain is almost impossible. Thus, it ...


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I note that in the 1600s Russia and the Qing dynasty fought over territory in north eastern Asia (and thus in Siberia) and that the Qing won, and kept that area until Russia captured it in the 19th or 20th century. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Russian_border_conflicts[1] Siberia is named after the Siberian Khanate in western Siberia. The modern usage ...


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The Russian expansion east is really interesting. It is covered in depth by "China and Russia: The Great Game" by O Edmund Clubb. Basically, there were many parties vying for control of the land. Qing China and Russia both had a huge interest in controlling Siberia, as they were well aware of the threat from nomadic steppe peoples. For example, the ...


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China ? Would have been the number one but: costs ? why ? our farmers can grow a lot of food which we then can tax The barbars is towards the north, so costs ? Why create trouble with them ? This is basically the reasons why the chinese bureaucrazy killed of the seagoing merchant fleets (which were done in an unnecessary expensive way.) China could have ...


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First of all, Alexander Ulyanov was a member of a terrorist organization (the terrorist faction of "People’s Will"), planning an assassination of Russian tzar, Alexander III, on the 6th year anniversary (March 1, 1887) of assassination of Alexander II, see here. The plot was foiled and most plotters were hanged (one, a former military officer, ...


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