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4

According to this reference the Soviets fielded anti-tank guns and were added by fog: The 11th Tank Regiment also attacked the Soviet forces. About 40 Japanese tanks run over the Soviet soldiers and rushed into the beach. The Soviet soldiers fired to the tanks with AT guns, which were unloaded on the beach in a hurry. As a fog gathered over the beach, it ...


4

Related, probably Yes. Descended from, probably Not. Of course a quick look at the wiki page for Alexander von Benckendorff tells us the connection isn't one of descent : Children 3 daughters So we know we are looking for some other connection. Starting with the IMDB biography for Carolyn Seymour we find: Grandaughter of Moura Budberg and niece of ...


4

I'm not seeing anything specifically about the tanks, so something looking at a full action report would probably be a better answer. However, just looking over what's there... Tanks can be quite vulnerable to aircraft, and to anything with really big guns outside of their own limited firing range that they can't get at, like a ship or offshore gun battery. ...


0

In the end of 1941 and beginning of 1942, the Soviets had multiple problems with artillery. The first one was shell and batteries availability: there was not enough of them for field artillery. It was not that much a problem since the mud, and later the snow, reduced the capacity of artillery to inflict damages. So the Soviets relied on infiltration tactics ...


3

Geography and technology. The conditions to support large cities were not possible with the technology of the day. Climatic conditions generally favor agriculture in warm, oceanic climates with mild winters for early civilizations (more food variety, higher yield). Cooler periods hit places in the far north harder than the Mediterranean. The early rise of ...


4

This is clearly a translation problem. The pamphlet clearly speaks about Hungarians who, according to the paper, are bloodthirstily willing the revenge toward the kind and gentle russians who have saved Hungarians from their Ukrainity. The paper is written in a mixture of a convoluted officialese (канцелярит), densely decorated with patriotic speech and ...


-4

Uskoreniye is Michail Gorbachev's word for the necessary acceleration of political and economical workings in Soviet Union (Russia.) I think that Tsar Peter's actions to provoke actions of change in 17th century Russia was a predecessor of this though Peter's thinkings was more towards improvements which could be exploited as improvements in the army and ...


7

The question is based on false premises: The Eastern European Plain is often claimed as the homeland of the Proto-Indo-Europeans. If this is where the seeds of European civilisation were first sown, why did it take so long to found cities here? The Proto-Indo-Europeans, whereever they lived, did not sow the seeds of European civilization, they sowed the ...


52

The whole point of the reign of Peter the Great was to "modernize" (westernize) Russia. Per the wikipedia article, "Peter implemented sweeping reforms aimed at modernizing Russia.[10] Heavily influenced by his advisors from Western Europe, Peter reorganized the Russian army along modern lines and dreamed of making Russia a maritime power. He faced much ...


1

Probably not. Michael Romanov accepted the throne reluctantly (at age 16), and mainly out of a sense of duty to family members who had been abused by the previous Tsar, Boris Gudunov. The Third Rome issue was much more in vogue around the turn of the 15th and 16th centuries. This was used to support the claim to the Russian throne of Ivan III, who had ...


1

Very unlikely. The Russian orthodox Church became autocephalous in 1448, half a decade before Constantinople fell (though such was clearly imminent). Throughout the Middle Ages the true heir of the Roman Empire was seen to be the various Christian Catholic Patriarchies, of Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. It was as natural for the ...


2

Short Answer. I can't say whether any of the votes for Michael Romanov had anything to do with his "Roman" surname. Long Answer: I do have some comments on the Third Rome ideologies of Russia and other states. And I have a suggestion for how the Romanov family could have claimed to be descended from Roman Emperors, though as far as I know the Romanovs ...


7

Yes, he did As @LangLangC wrote in a comment, the relevant document is available at the Austrian State Archive (Nottendorfer Gasse 2, 1030 Wien) under the number ÖStA AVA MdI Präs. 19/3. Zl. 17256/15. The staff will give you a folder, slightly bigger than A4 that looks like this: (click images for higher resolution) Inside this folder there are multiple ...


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