16

No. The Persian name is a derivation or descendant of the legendary Kay Khosrow. Looking at the list of name bearers Khosrow reveals that the name is in much longer use than 532 CE. Variants of the name کیخسرو‎ Husrav, Xusro, Khusro, Khosrau, Khusrau, Chusrau, Khosro, Khosru, Khosrow or Khusraw. In Greek it is sometimes rendered C(h)osroes or Osroes. ...


15

The critical factor all these answers leave out: The Black Death. The Plague of Justinian swept through the Byzantine and Sassanid Empires a few generations before Islam. On the Byzantine side, the reduction in manpower available for warfare was near 90%. The damage to the economies of both empires made it unlikely they'd rebuild the population losses ...


14

Long lasting wars between Sassanians and Byzantine empire had made cripple armed forces of both of them and made their borders vulnerable. Lakhmids were acting as a buffer state between nomad Arabs and Persia. But Khosrow II made them into neutral force practically. the practice made Iran's southern border more vulnerable. Kavadh II massacred a lot of ...


9

Byzantium and Persia were both greatly weakened by titanic wars they had fought with each other during the reign of Heraclius - at one point Byzantium was surrounded, and at another Heraclius was taking Persia's capital city. But aside from that, there was a structural weakness in the Eastern provinces near where Islam was being born - the Monophysite ...


9

Questions about the historical accuracy of holy texts can get dicey, so I'll try to treat this like any other question. First, I'm not an Islamic scholar, so I'm not going to try and work out whether the translation is "lowest land" or "nearest land", but just note there seems to be some contention about exactly what is meant in the passage in question, Qur'...


6

As others have said, the names and titles of Caesar/Kaiser and of Khusrau/Khosrow/Chosroes/Kisra are unrelated. But there is a famous historical example of someone claiming to be related to both Caesar and Khosrow. The Caliph Yazid III (701-744) recited a poem about his exalted ancestry: I am the son of Chosroes, my ancestor was Marwan, Caesar was my ...


4

This list provides many options for Persian names. For most of the names it does not state whether they were used pre- or post-Islamic but with a bit of searching for the names themselves it's possible to find some. Here are some more definitely old Persian names, presumably from historical figures.


2

Wool breathes well. Central Asia can also be very cold. They didn't live in their armour. Consider how hot soldiers in tanks must have been in WWII in places like North Africa. People got used to it. The crusading armies were wearing gambesons and the like in their wars. Armour needs to balance between protection and wearability. The heavy bronze age ...


1

Pre-modern empires are generally driven toward territorial expansion. Obviously the territories of the Mediterranean and Central Asia each brought a range of different resources that the opposing empire would like to control. When two large rivals get in each others way, conflict is almost inevitable. It is tempting to draw comparisons with other bipolar ...


1

But they did make a lasting peace...in 628 when Kavadh II agreed to Hieraclius' terms. History took a sharp turn a few years later, when the Arabs conquered the Sassanid Empire, but the Arabs didn't impose the settlement of 628. Perhaps you meant to ask why they didn't make a lasting peace much sooner?


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