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Q Is rye bread Turkish? Are Swedes Africans? If you find the 'African Swedes' question senseless, then you see the level of absurdity the ad is playing on. If you answer 'Swedes are Africans' in the affirmative, then Rye bread is Turkish' might have a broken and wobbly leg to stand on. Swedes are humans, humans originate from Africa. True. But a long time ...


41

Well rye itself (the grain) appears to have first been domesticated in Anatolia, around 6,500 BC. So of course Neolithic people there (modern Turkey) would have been the first to make rye bread.* As for why it became popular in Scandinavia, that probably shouldn't be a mystery either. The European staple grains of wheat, barley, and rye are all closely ...


13

The short answer is we're not sure. When the Roman State was in decline and had to withdraw from England, (coincidentally?) Germanic tribal power was on the increase. That left a power vacuum in England at the same latitudes that coastal Germanic tribes were already living on the opposite shore of the North Sea. Unfortunately, it also left a literacy vacuum,...


5

What exactly happened at early things is sparsely recorded, if not to say for really earlier times wholly non-existent as traditional sources. Without written sources, things get complicated. But we have hints. Among those is that for a medieval perspective this civilising tendency was apparently comparably late, and parallel in temporal development with the ...


3

After more research it appears, that weapons might have not been allowed in Norwegian Things (or at least Gulathing) at all and were only used as a way of showing agreement in Germanic tradition. Wikipedia:Thing


1

Maybe No! People in northern France and England started just because to eat a great deal of 'rye bread'. They didn't have a favorable opinion of it – they called rye bread "black bread" and whined about eating it rather than "white bread" produced using refined wheat flour.


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