Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

43

One man's lock is another man's puzzle. Combination locks have been used since at least ancient Rome. Whether the lock uses numbers or letters (or other symbols), the combination to be entered may be set based on a riddle or some other piece of knowledge as a mnemonic. The lock is meant to be solved at some future time by someone who has the correct ...


39

The Copper Scroll The Copper Scroll is a Dead Sea scroll found in 1952, unique in that it is of copper (with a little tin), has a list of 63 or 64 locations of treasure with "obscure hints of the locations". Although it was initially disputed whether or not the list was historical rather than legendary, a scholarly consensus seems to be emerging that ...


37

SHORT ANSWER Jodrell Bank's first 'coup', tracking Sputnik 1 in 1957 (without Soviet assistance), put it in the news and helped secure funding. It also led to a congratulatory telegram from the Soviets. After doubts were expressed about Luna 1 (Jan 1959) being real, the Soviets sent the coordinates for Luna 2 (Sept 1959) to Jodrell Bank head Bernard Lovell ...


27

Firstly, it is important to be aware that our understanding of the civilisations and culture of Pre-Columbian America is far from complete. Secondly, I don't propose to attempt to cover every civilisation, so this will - at best - be only a partial answer. However, with those caveats: As far as I am aware, we have no evidence that any pre-Columbian ...


17

The project that Scott Manley is referring to was known as Project A119, and was run at the Armour Research Foundation (ARF), which was based at the Illinois Institute of Technology. The ARF is now known as the IIT Research Institute. The official title of Project A119 was A Study of Lunar Research Flights, and Volume 1 of the report, produced in 1959 by ...


15

Short answer: Was there ever any particular desire to use a specific part of Nazi experiments on humans? Yes. A concrete example would be the Dachau Hypothermia Experiments How was it resolved? It isn't resolved. It remains a matter of controversy. Ethical Issues In the 1984 Hastings Center Report, Should the Nazi research data be cited?, ...


8

I'm going to address your question in two parts: 1. The accuracy of the claim that attendance dropped. 2. The effect that the lectures had on the attendees. Firstly, as you rightly hypothesised, the tale of dropping attendance was false. This stemmed from a preface to the book, written by David Goodstein and Gerry Neugebauer. They wrote that "… as the ...


7

The Spanish and Portuguese noticed early in the 16th century that the native peoples of the Caribbean and South and Central America were sickly to the point of being unsuitable (in general) for slave labour. From this the First Atlantic System develops into South and Central America: Regarding the Atlantic slave trade [The First Atlantic System] started (...


6

This is a long answer, so here is a list of connections that the public could have made, in no particular order: It was the work of the Gods and Goddesses It was the manifestation of the spirit within the object It was a form of magnetism It was a miniaturised form of lightning It was proof of hidden powers and magic of various kinds It was some ...


6

Of the 33 series of human experiments almost all have been dismissed by then the contemporary and now modern science on two counts. One, of course, is the lack of medical ethics in obtaining the results, but the other major objection is on the lack of scientific value due to bad methodology (poor premises, poor experimentation, poor documentation, poor ...


6

Question: Why did Jodrell Bank assist the Soviet Union to collect data from their spacecraft in the mid 1960's?....... He (BBC's Tim O’Brien) does indeed describe something more like assistance than spying..... Was this purely scientific camaraderie (pardon the pun), or inter-government cooperation or something else? Clearly the Soviet Union's space ...


6

"International Geophysical Year" (IGY) ran from from 1 July 1957 to 31 December 1958. Eisenhower's speech in October 1957 was being made in that context. Image source Wikimedia The United States' Explorer 1 satellite was launched as one of the projects for that year. The US intention to launch an artificial satellite during the IGY had been announced in ...


6

Jean Froissart wrote And I often, with a little tube, Made a soap bubble fly from the water. I'm not sure when he wrote this but he died in about 1405. Also, there's a picture of a monkey maybe blowing a bubble. The text under the picture says Detail from a full border of a monkey playing a game (possibly blowing bubbles?), from the Isabella ...


5

The Egyptian labyrinth(s) could possibly be an example of actual treasure hidden behind a puzzle. I had a little difficulty finding a source that "felt reliable". This tantalizingly detailed description: You entered the maze from a descending stairway, hidden on the south side of the pyramid, which led to a small chamber. This apparently led nowhere;...


4

The Wikipedia article Myth of the flat Earth gives a general summary for the Western world as: According to Stephen Jay Gould, "there never was a period of 'flat Earth darkness' among scholars (regardless of how the public at large may have conceptualized our planet both then and now). ... Historian Jeffrey Burton Russell says the flat-Earth error ...


4

Alla Masevich writes in the memoirs under the name "Stars and Satellites in My Life": In fact for Lovell such request was an important reason for advertizing of the telescope. For the first time from the USSR asked for the help, and it, but not in the USA. http://www.ras.ru/FStorage/download.aspx?id=7780a8cf-35f6-4024-8541-69b1adaeeea6 Alla Genrikhovna ...


4

No-one, because you don't go blabbing to people how you did it! E.g. some people think the Voynich manuscript is coded version of someone's attempt. Isaac Newton wrote about his intermediate steps, one of which was called 'the green lion'. What did that mean? Who knows! But we can deduce that since he was so secretive about his rrsearch, if it had been ...


3

I'm not sure if this is it but Philip Wylie was put under house arrest in 1945 due to his writing being too close to atomic secrecy. That's not quite the same thing but he couldn't check out his own books while this was going on: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Wylie


3

As can be gathered by the other answers, it's a complex topic. The University of Manchester website gives some extra information. Firstly, the Soviets were probably annoyed that no-one outside of the the Soviet Union believed that the Luna 1 probe, launched on 2 January 1959 existed. For the next successful launch, the Soviets decided to get Jodrell Bank to ...


2

Richard Owen was a Fellow of the Royal Society (F.R.S.) until his death in 1892. Despite the various controversies, the biologist and paleontologist was nominated for the Royal Society's governing council again in 1862. His life-time fellowship was never withdrawn and he remained an active member both politically and academically into his 80s. However, he ...


2

If you look into the details of the page on suppressed research in the Soviet Union that you linked to you'll notice that very little hard science got politicized in practice. At worst there were a few rough starts and things fell into place. On biology, which to me stood out as one of the two hard science examples that endured serious suppression efforts: ...


2

Charles Darwin died in 1882 but his grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, actually proposed a theory of evolution in 1770. Charles was strongly influenced by his scientific grandfather. Thomas Henry Huxley coined 'Darwinism' in 1860. A scientific definition of Darwinism is taken from 'Life' book - Nature Library - Evolution. The full title of Darwin's first book ...


2

Here is an interesting recent article related to the subject on BBC News: Pernkopf: The Nazi book of anatomy still used by surgeons from which one can learn that surgeons are still using the Nazi anatomic atlas which was made when dissecting the bodies of executed political prisoners. But apparently there is no better atlas... The main author was ...


2

It is unlikely that identifying the particular event that caused the aurora is going to be possible. Solar monitoring was in its infancy in the 1960s. However, while rare, it is certainly possible for aurorae to be visible at latitudes even further south than Belleville. From the Wikipedia page on Aurora: Auroras are produced when the magnetosphere is ...


2

Question: How present is/was in the US legislation the concept of “race” and why? Very very present. The first line of the first piece of legislation passed by the Continental Congress July 4th 1776, the Declaration of Independence is partially about race. Declaration of Independence of the United States We hold these truths to be self-evident, that ...


2

Transmutation of gold would not be useless to those who had know-how to do it First of all, you need to know that even in case of paper money, does who have ability to "print" (or rather to create) it, and those who receive freshly created money benefit the most. Concept that explains this is called seigniorage. In modern times, FED loans money to certain ...


1

The paper, Galileo and the Tower of Pisa experiment, by Carl G. Adler and Byron L. Coulter (published in the American Journal of Physics 46(3), March 1978), demonstrates that it was almost certainly a thought experiment, and that he could not have obtained the results presented in his paper by actually performing the experiment in the real world. ...


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