48

According to Wikipedia, The Assyrians typically prominently placed lamassu at the entrances of cities and palaces. From the front they appear to stand, and from the side, walk. Something confirmed by the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art: The sculptor gave these guardian figures five legs so that they appear to be standing firmly when viewed ...


24

The identification was originally made by Franz Studniczka in his 1908 Das Bildnis des Aristoteles. The basis of his argument is a miniature bust, discovered by the Italian antiquary, Fulvio Orsini, back in the late 16th century. That bust had an inscribed base, which identified it as a portrait of Aristotle. Unfortunately, it has since been lost. ...


17

There are many theories & interpretations, but relatively little evidence to support most of them. Of course, there are no written sources from the Ubaid period to support them. You are absolutely right that there hasn't been a great deal of published material on the subject. However, a good, and relatively recent (2006), paper on the subject is A ...


13

On very many statues from antiquity exserted parts are broken, in most cases hands, but noses are also very often. The purely mechanical reasons are evident. There are no reasons to conclude that this statue was defaced. Here is one example of the many: They say this is Cleopatra VII. I do not think anyone hated her so much as to break the nose on her ...


10

I think that if you view the statue from head-on, you only see the front two legs. If you view the statue from the side, you see four. At that time, they probably couldn't just clear away all the rest of the rock so that you could see four legs from any direction.


7

Looks like the image is based on the myth of Eos pursuing Tithonos: Other images Here and the image you have(apparently edited for today's sense of decency and appears on the cover of this book: Women in Greek Myth Paperback – January 16, 2007 by Mary R. Lefkowitz


5

Google image search eventually led here. Cola di Rienzo (or de Rienzi; Italian pronunciation: [ˌkɔːla di ˈrjɛnt͜so] or [de ˈrjɛnt͜si]) (c. 1313 – 8 October 1354) was an Italian medieval politician and popular leader, tribune of the Roman people in the mid-14th century.


5

The Wikipedia page you link to for the image credits this work as Roman copy in marble of a Greek bronze bust of Aristotle by Lysippos, c. 330 BC, I can't address your sources for small eyes, since you have not provided them, but we do find the following when we look up the sculptor Lysippos (emphasis mine) Lysippos's work is described by ancient sources ...


4

1) By the time wealthy western Europeans were embarking on grand tours of Greece and Italy and describing ancient Greek and Roman temples in writing and in paintings, the original paintwork had mostly all been weathered away. Imitation of this architectural style therefore omitted the decoration. 2) Protestant reformation. Frescoes and lavish decoration ...


4

The first use of the term golden section (Der goldenen schnitt) was by the German mathematician Martin Ohm in his book "Pure Elementary Mathematics" (1835). Since Ohm, various authors have theorized about the presence of the ratio between the extreme and mean as defined by Book 2, Proposition 11 of Euclid, notably Jay Hambridge in his book "Dynamic Symmetry: ...


3

Henri Matisse, the great French artist said "Exactitude is not truth". An accurate and precise representation of something may not convey the meaning that the artist intended. For example the size of a human figure in ancient Egyptian pictures was meant to represent their importance in society, not their physical size. Anyone back then could 'read' the ...


2

You are expressing a very strange minority opinion. So the question is really not "why old art...", but "why do you think so...". People who have seen ancient and pre-historic art are usually very much impressed and rate many things on the highest level. For example, Pablo Picasso, after he was shown the paintings in Altamira cave said: "We have invented ...


1

For a completely subjective answer to a completely subjective question, a quick google on the meaning of white: White, an inherently positive color, is associated with purity, virginity, innocence, light, goodness, heaven, safety, brilliance, illumination, understanding, cleanliness, faith, beginnings, sterility, spirituality, possibility, humility, ...


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