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5

Most of the answers focus on the similarities between serfdom and slavery, and it can often get subjective based on the one's political views (an anarchist or communist might claim that modern salaried employment is the same as slavery, because the employee doesn't own the means of production and most of the profit goes to the employer). Therefore, here are ...


6

One problem, as has been pointed out above, is that the terms "serf" & "slave" are largely defined in context of the culture they are used in. Almost any statement one could make about a "slave" could often apply to a "serf" too. For example, servants in ancient Rome were always slaves, yet (if I remember my Tolstoy correctly) Russian nobility had "house ...


35

It seems like you are trying to treat "slavery" and "serfdom" as trans-historical categories, and that is where the confusion lies. To make meaningful definitions and comparisons, we have to be more specific. There are many different forms of so-called "unfree labor" and each must be understood in its own context. Unfree Labor is the title of a classic book ...


11

In English Law (post Norman-conquest) there are in general two classes of Villeins, with shared aspects: Villeins en regardant: A villein annexed to the manor of land; a serf. The consequence of being annexed to the land is that these villeins are both required to, and guaranteed the right to, till the land to which they are annexed and enjoy its ...


23

Slavery and serfdom are legal terms; every legal framework (roughly every country) will have different definitions. So as you point out Roman slavery is different from French slavery, and both are different from serfdom. There is a linguistic principle that the definition of words refers to a cluster of related concepts (think of all the objects that can be ...


5

Question: What was the South actually afraid Lincoln or Congress would do that precipitated the Civil War? Short Answer: The trigger for the United States Civil war was not Lincoln's election to the Presidency. The United States had anti slavery, even abolitionist president's before and it had not provoked civil war. The trigger for the ...


-3

Exactly what it did: claim supreme national authority over the people of the individual states. Meanwhile, the Southern states argued that since each state had voluntarily joined the union, it had the right to leave the union; because the Constitution did not expressly unite them as a single nation-state (below). In 1776, each state was declared by its ...


0

Delphine LaLaurie, a serial killer of her slaves, was found guilty of their abuse and had her house attacked and destroyed by a mob in 1834. She did manage to escape justice by fleeing to France.


1

Short Answer: That story is not impossible in the sense of violating laws of physics, but extremely improbable, especially as some of the characters may have violated the laws of one or more nations and risked severe punishment by doing so. Long Answer: in the 17th century (1601-1700) a number of English persons were slave owners, of a sort. They were ...


0

Question: Was it possible for a young Japanese woman to end up enslaved in Great Britain in the mid-1600s? Possible? I would say yes. While it's true Japan's official slave system from the Yamato period (3rd century A.D.) through the Toyotomi Hideyoshi was abolished in 1590; the Western definition for slavery is perhaps broader in nature than that which ...


47

No. At least, not to any practical intent or purpose. Japanese in Britain Significant numbers of Japanese were actually sold into slavery overseas during the 16th century, mostly through Portuguese merchants. Aside from chattel slavery, Portuguese sailors also bought young Japanese women as concubines, and it would not have been unthinkable if one ...


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1: Could there have been young Japanese women in Great Britain in the mid-1600s? This seems extraordinarily unlikely. According to the British Chamber of Commerce in Japan 1600 William Adams, a seaman from Kent, becomes the first Briton to arrive in Japan. 1832 Three sailors from Aichi Prefecture—Otokichi, Kyukichi and Iwakichi—cross the Pacific ...


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