New answers tagged

5

The African state of Mthethwa might count. It was a nation that existed from around 1775 to 1817 that predated the Zulu Kingdom and, as far as we know, had no formal writing system. The nation used military innovations such as the system of age regiments (amabutho) that would come to be utilized by the Zulu empire. While not as big as the Inca, it was around ...


2

Good question. I don't claim to know the full answer, but this quote from Mary Beard's SPQR might shed some light. IN 212 CE the emperor Caracalla decreed that all the free inhabitants of the Roman Empire, wherever they lived, from Scotland to Syria, were Roman citizens. It was a revolutionary decision, which removed at a stroke the legal difference between ...


0

Question #1: Did Northern troops attempt to re-enslave African Americans in Southern plantations during the Civil War? Short Answer #1: Not Just Northern Troops. It was the North's policy for the first year of the war, to be followed by all of it's generals. Generals who did not follow this policy (like John Fremont) and freed slaves risked losing their ...


0

From McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom, p.711: The need of northern and British textile mills for cotton also caused the army to put many freed people to work growing cotton—often on the same plantations where they had done the same work as slaves. Some of these plantations remained in government hands and were administered by "labor superintendents&...


39

This is referring to the area around New Orleans, ca. 1863-5. The Emancipation Proclamation didn't apply to lower Louisiana, which was already under Union occupation. It only applied to areas that were in a state of insurrection on January 1, 1863. Slaves in lower Louisiana remained enslaved until the passage of the 13th amendment on December 6, 1865. So ...


5

It seems that a number of later historians have questioned that interpretation. In 1982 Eric Foner published an article called "Reconstruction Revisted" where he reviews relevant new developments in the historiography of the 1960s and 1970s. He writes: Challenging the contention that the Civil War signaled the eclipse of the old planter class and ...


4

This is a difficult question to answer as farming changed a lot during the Victorian era. There was increasing mechanization and farmers specialized more and more (dairy, cereals and so on). Some farms were very small, others were very big so they would be organized in different ways. A small farm would work alongside his family - with maybe a few laborers - ...


Top 50 recent answers are included