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23

The claim is sourced from 明興野記, lit. Unofficial Records of the Rise of Ming, by the contemporary Yu Ben. It was originally titled 紀事錄, lit. Chronicles, but a certain Zhang Da Tong later changed it because it wasn't fancy enough. Zhang also inserted some editorialising, especially to defend the emperor, as well as an abstract introducing Yu's work as "...


23

Since I have a good memory, I remembered and/or looked up a few names of Roman citizens who lived in Gaul or Britain or came from Gaul or Britain to other parts of the empire, and who wrote. These writers could be in ancestry anything from 100 percent Roman, or Spanish, or Egyptian, or Syrian, or Greek, or whatever, to 100 percent native Gauls or Britons ...


23

For the US, there's an article on Constitution Daily which says something about this. First it says: At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, there was little public debate about the age requirements and no discussion about the age requirement for the presidency. Then it gets more helpful when it refers to James Monroe. James Monroe also ...


19

The first thing that came to mind was the Rosetta Stone. While King Ptolemy V Epiphanes' decree that's inscribed in it is not particularly significant, the Rosseta Stone is a trilingual inscription, written in hieroglyphics, demotic Egyptian and Greek, and it's discovery in 1799 lead to the decipherment of hieroglyphics and thus to a far better understanding ...


18

There is a certain Rutilius Namatianus who lived in the early 5th century Gaul. I do not know how much Celtic ancestry he had. He admired Rome and considered his family part of its "sacred Genius", but his poem clearly shows patriotic emotions to his narrower homeland: Rather will you marvel, reader, that my quick return journey (to Gaul) can so soon ...


17

Napoleon is widely described as either a demigod or a demon / devil, though, as Danila Smirnov mentioned, not immortal. Might you be misremembering this, or perhaps something like it: Napoleon . . . [is] sometimes cast as a demigod, sometimes as a demon, practically always seen as a figure considerably larger than life. Probably no other mortal has ...


16

Historians engage with such sources all the time. Just like any other historical source, they are evaluated in relation to other available evidence. It is true that ancient historians had different standards of evidence then modern ones, and this must be taken in to account. But all sources can include distortions and that is in no way unique to these ...


15

I think the Norse discovery of the Americas fit. Around year 1000, an expedition led by Norseman Leiv Eiriksson winter camped on Newfoundland. From the Wikipedia article: For some centuries after Christopher Columbus' voyages opened the Americas to large-scale colonization by Europeans, it was unclear whether these stories [of Leiv Eiriksson's ...


15

Information on how slaves were treated in the 1,000 or so city states other than Athens is thin on the ground; for most of these city states we know next to nothing about them so comparisons between Athens and other cities are very difficult. Further, much of what we do know (even about slaves in Athens where are sources are far better than elsewhere) comes ...


15

Question: Are the historical sources from the ancient history trustable? . Short Answer: Controversial topic. There is no blanket finding on historical texts accuracy or inaccuracy which enjoy's consensus support among historians. Historians generally support the critical analysis of historical texts matching them against ...


14

The historical Jesus is completely irrelevant to Judaism or Jewish life or history. (As contrasted with Christianity, which has had a very big impact on the most recent two millennia of Jewish history.) There are Jewish texts in the Talmud that refer to someone named something like “Jesus”, but it is not clear whether they refer to differing traditions ...


14

I found what Sudoplatov actually writes in this book. The reference is in his memoirs. Here is my translation: In May 1941, a German Ju-52 penetrated Soviet airspace and, unnoticed, successfully landed on the central airfield of Moscow, near Dynamo stadium. This created a stir in Kremlin and led to a wave of repressions among the military command: ...


13

This is the answer I owe you, which I am sure by now will be of no use to you. Disclaimer: here I answer to my own interpretation of the question. Although this is true for every worldly answer, I felt like writing this warning because of the extent of my freedom of interpretation. Also, because of my limited Mediterranean/European background I might be ...


13

Logically there are only two legit sources this story could come from if true; the two participants. As the brick-chucker does not strike me as a man of letters (and is far from the hero in this story), I think its reasonable to rule him out. That leaves Wesley himself. The problem there, as both the question and another answer have alluded to, is that ...


12

This story seems to have been popularized by S. Venetsky in an unsourced article which first appeared in July 1969 in the Russian journal Metallurgist. The article was reprinted in Tales about Metals (1981). Unfortunately, in neither case does the author cite a source. According to Venetsky, Napoleon III loved to show off and one day he gave a banquet at ...


11

I'll start with the archetypical story of the type: Troy. Up till 19th century, people believed that Homer's and Virgil's troy was a legend, not a real city (unlike Greeks and Romans). In 1865/1868, Calvert and especially Heinrich Schliemann have found what they believed to be real Troy (though later archaeology, fully detailed on Wikipedia, showed that ...


11

It is short for adhibendum. I think the English equivalent would be something along the lines of "annex" or "appendix". As in, "Appendix B, Vol II, Proceedings of the School Conference of 1891". I don't believe this is a general history convention. As far as I can determine, it's mainly a German usage; the example you gave is also citing a German ...


10

There are no Indian accounts of the Battle of the Hydaspes River. It is difficult to prove a negative, but since there is very little historical material from that era (326 BCE) at all, we can be reasonably certain that there are no historical accounts. Tarn (1966) discusses this when talking about the Bactrian Greeks. Had the story of the Bactrian ...


10

Because they were not "better" or "more effective". There are generally poor reports of the People's Liberation Army's effectiveness against Japan during World War II. - Elleman, Bruce A. Modern Chinese Warfare, 1795-1989. Routledge, 2005. Keep in mind that comparisons are difficult to make because the Nationalists[1] bore the brunt[2] of all ...


10

I don't know whether this is true, but there is some information about it in Russian Internet. Russian Wikipedia article says 15 мая 1941 года немецкий Ju 52 вторгся в советское воздушное пространство и, пролетев по маршруту Белосток — Минск — Смоленск незамеченным, приземлился в Москве на центральном аэродроме около стадиона «Динамо». Translation:...


10

Seems to check out, for a small part at least: With 80 men moved out, with 81 returned home The relief at home was great: "Already in Nendeln the contingent of authorities, relatives and population was celebrated," says Geiger. And the legend is true: The 80 Liechtenstein soldiers came home with one more soldier whom the troop had won as a friend. ...


9

Following-up on @FelixGoldberg's answer I found this in Sources and Notes of Vincent Cronin's Napoleon: The remark attributed to N[apoleon], "I know men, and I tell you that Jesus Christ was not a man" is apocryphal. [Robert-Antoine de] Beauterne, who coined it never met N[apoleon]. This is good enough evidence for me; it suggests the following: ...


9

Closest I'm finding is a quote by Henry A. Wise Wood, referred to as a civic leader. Quoting Votes For Women: Woman Suffrage Movement by Marjorie Spruill Wheeler: Women not only pointed out that women would cease to be womanly, but that male supporters of suffrage ("strong, masculine personalities") were inexplicably seeking to "demasculinize" government ...


9

Those inconsistencies are exactly when historiography becomes crucial to historical understanding. Disagreement between sources raises questions about the quality of the sources and those who reported them. The risk of not addressing these issues is that erroneous information can become accepted, and must then be recast in light of the qualities of the ...


9

If I'm going to address this in context, the general point is that all we have to go by is written records, and in eras of low literacy, that means all we get is the perspective of the few literate people. The early Middle Ages (aka: "Dark Ages") were definitely a period of low literacy in Europe, and in this case the few people who had the ability and ...


8

Eyes to the South offers slightly more information. An internal power struggle between the military and political faction was resolved when the military faction killed Ramdane. (See page 30) Another paper suggests, The leaders of the interior, under extremist Ramdane Abane, held a conference in the Soummam Valley in Algeria and did not include Ben ...


8

Tank gun itself is short barrelled 7.5cm KwK 37, as mentioned in nvoigt comment. This means that the tank is either early PzKpfw IV (D to F1 versions employed in USSR) , or less likely PzKpfw III Ausf. N . However, PzKpfw III Ausf. N usually had armored skirts around turret and hull, plus camo pattern painted on. If we assume tank to be Pzkw IV, then it ...


7

The problem there is that there isn't a lot of written work from that area available that early. The only real literate society of the ancient era was the Bronze-Age Indus Valley Civilization, and we haven't deciphered their script yet. After the IV civilization was eclipsed, writing was unknown there until about the third century BCE. So for the vast ...


7

This quote appears in several mid-1800s texts, including the above-referenced "Sur Le Christianisme" text. Henry Parry Liddon wrote a footnote regarding the quote suggesting its authenticity. He references another Bertrand source, "Sentiment de Napoleon sur la Divinite de Jesus Christ." He cites a response to the author of the preface to Campagnes d'Egypte ...


7

There are quite a few great sources on this topic. If by “how common”, you are implying that you are looking for hard, measurable and very-much-incomplete sample data (that you have to, of course, collate yourself), this is going to come from digitized historical court records like the Assize Courts that @Kobunite linked to, or from the proceedings of the ...


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