14

Panzer 38(t) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panzer_38(t)#Peru They were apparently the only tanks Peru had in the war with Ecuador, bought by a Peruvian mission to Europe. The size of the wheels match, it is not a Vickers or FT17.


5

Short Answer: After 1520, the lands in the Americas were certainly under the Castilian crown. Long Answer: As far as I know the lands in the new world were all under the crown of Castile and had no connection with the crown of Aragon., except that Ferdinand and Isabella may have jointly ruled them from 1492 to 1504, and when Queen Isabella of Castile, etc....


5

Colonizers heading for the gold mines at Cuiabá in the early 18th century used the Panará River. They also used the Tietê River for part of their journey, but not between Sao Paolo and Porto Feliz. Those seeking their fortunes in Cuiabá made an epic trek of at least five months that pitted them against deprivation, hunger, rapids, whirlpools, and ...


5

For what this website defines as history (roughly, "the story of humanity"), there's rather a lot of "pre-Columbian history" in South America, and you can't really depict it all in a single map. Population density maps for 6500BCE, 3500BCE, and 1491 AD would all look quite different from each other. For the purposes of the rest of the answer, I'm going to ...


5

Not sure what the rules are about this, but I had this post from AskHistorians bookmarked. Written by u/Ahhuatl This is really a question better suited for r/AskAnthropology, as strictly speaking the field of history doesn't concern itself with cross-cultural comparisons of social evolution. Nevertheless, I'll put on my anthropologist hat and ...


2

Too much land. The population density in South and Central America (about 6 million for the Aztecs) was much higher than in most of North America (500,000 for all of Canada). Having too little population means that people within the society are unable to specialize, and trade becomes harder to conduct for less gains. The copper that was used in Greece ...


2

Question: Did any European ever witness a major Inca religious festival? Short Answer: No. The Incan empire had been decapitated, engaged in a 6 year fratricidal civil war for supremacy, as well hit with a devastating pandemic (which killed as many as 65-90%) of it's population before the first Europeans met (briefly) with Inas on dry land. It is highly ...


1

According to the "Pre-Colombian era" article on Wikipedia, there were 4 major cultural groups that developed permenant settlements of significance in South America: the Muisca, Valdivia, Quechua and Aymara. The Valdivian settlement ( in what is now coastal Ecuador) declined centuries before the Spanish arrived. The main Quecha group in 1500 were the Inca, ...


1

In addition to the answers above, another reason for this difference in advancement could be climate. An event called the Little Ice Age happened from 1300 onwards, leading to food shortages in many Native American cities in North America and hampered their ability to create larger urban centers and harness agricultural advances that help with the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible