20

The people living along the northern coastline of Australia, in the Kimberley, Arnhem Land, Gulf of Carpentaria and Cape York had encounters with various visitors for many thousands of years. People and traded goods moved freely between Australia and New Guinea. Indonesian "Bajau" fishermen from the Spice Islands (e.g. Banda) have fished off the coast of ...


16

From Pakistan to Japan is indeed a big region and "before rice" a long and varied time frame. But this question seems to imply that it is concerned with the early neolithic centers of agriculture in Asia and what the first main staple foods in these were, excluding all rice. Short answer to that for the North-Eastern region in question, over the course of ...


16

In terms of Chinese naval explorers in general, Zheng He springs to mind. He was one of China's primary explorers in the Indian Ocean and beyond in the 14th and 15th centuries. Around this time, the Europeans had been venturing eastward. Zheng He went westward to the "Western Oceans", going to India and the Middle East by sea in an attempt to show China's ...


14

People from what is modern day Indonesia were visiting northern Australia to collect and process trepang (sea-cucumber or sea slug) for centuries before European settlement. These people are generally referred to as Macassan (or Makassan). The first European to circumnavigate Australia, Matthew Flinders, encountered Macassans processing trepang. ...


12

Given that the stirrup was invented in Asia, horses were not a rarity in Asia. Look at Asian art work, and you'll see that horses were not rare at all, but common. What animals were used in Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos? Horses were common riding animals. So were donkeys and mules. The most common draught animal was probably the water buffalo. Even ...


11

It's an interesting question (although it has been 2 years without satisfying answer; maybe you've found the answer), because it is located between Jawa Timur (East Java) and Nusa Tenggara Barat (West Nusa Tenggara), both of them have about 96% muslim population [1, 2]. Usually people will follow their leader, especially before this modern era. They ...


10

Both views you've heard are somewhat right. Singapore was already an important port by the time of its independence, yet its growth accelerated so quickly after independence that the Singapore of forty years ago probably does seem like a backwater: According to official statistics released since 1960, the economic indicators of Singapore show a ...


8

The history is disputed between the Rakhine and Rohingya, but in essence it is related to population movement between the Chittagong region (now south-eastern Bangladesh) and Arakan (now Rakhine state in Burma/Myanmar), and so whether the Rohingya should be seen as recent immigrants or as indigenous people. Most Rakhine, Burmese and Buddhists from other ...


8

Horses were omnipresent in Asia at the same time periods that we call the Middle Ages in European history. In the 13th century, the Mongols were riding roughshod over all of Asia, and given that they were probably the best riders in history (certainly of the time), any area they conquered (all of China, much of the Middle East and India) can be assumed to ...


7

Japanese quasi-colonialism in the 17th century mostly took place in Siam. There, the king had hired Japanese mercenaries to fight his battles, and these mercenaries threatened to take over the country from the early part of the century to 1630, until they were driven out. This was not a move that had the blessing of the Japanese government (from which the ...


6

(Disclaimer: I've not seen that documentary so I'm sure what exactly it said.) Sort of. In a literal sense, Angkor Wat was built upon a sea of groundwater. The city was built in a very wet and water-rich area; much of this water found its way underground. At the lower levels, the water fills up all the pores and holes in the sandy soil. The water table ...


6

I can only agree with some of the points, as I have an extensive understanding of Austronesian migratory history but am still vague on Australasian. My only contribution is to add that Australia was not so much a lost continent but rather a vast and imposing one which was not entirely cut of from southern migration. It was part of PNG during the ice age ...


6

tl; dr How close did the French actually come to succeeding at getting the project underway? The project never came close to getting underway. The route chosen for the survey proved to be unsuitable for a number of reasons, and this, together with British political objections, ensured that France would never be awarded a concession to build the canal. ...


6

I am not going to even come close to answering this simple question. But it's worth a try because of perennial confusion on Southeast Asia. The region, concept and people of Southeast Asia is, to me, a living museum. Southeast Asia Political Border Source: Geographic guide. Country names in orange box, region is the larger dark blue box. MSEA (mainland ...


6

Question: What is the current state of our knowledge regarding potential routes and vessels the Asian ancestors of the Malagasy may have used to reach Madagascar, and some key items of evidence supporting any hypotheses that may exist? Answer: Most likely from Maritime Southeast Asia, via Malay-controlled trade ships on Indian Ocean voyages during 1st ...


6

I recommend reading Ian Morris' book Why The West Rules - For Now. He discusses this topic in a few chapters. Although Ming Dynasty China had ships which could cross the Pacific and sail around the entire world, the government ministers chose not to. (The Ming Emperor was 12 years old at the time, so the government mandarins would have been making the ...


5

His wikipedia entry mentions among other things that: Thiệu was a son of a small, well-off landowner who earned his living by farming and fishing. [...] His elder brothers raised money so that he could attend the elite schools run by France, who were Vietnam’s colonial rulers. Although not yet a Catholic (he would convert later in life after getting ...


4

In the GGS book, the NS orientation is appointed as only one of the reasons that Eurasia was more developed than America and Sub-Saharan Africa. It also considers narrow points and bottlenecks (e.g., panama) which hampers migration and technology spread; the fact that American corn was less efficient in calories-hour than Chinese rice or Eurasian wheat; ...


4

The problem with the Thesis in Gun, Germs, and Steel is that we have one example of an E-W megacontinent (Eurasia) and one example of a N-S one (the Americas). Africa is a bit small, and vague on E-W vs N-S. The Island comparison probably fails due to the small size of any island, so the different terrain zones are similar.


4

There are a couple of factors here I haven't seen mentioned: Skyscrapers are generally office buildings, often owned by a single company. Asian skyscrapers often mean to represent economical success of a company. Buildings in countries like Japan are generally built for short term, couple of decades, no more. Also, centralized policy on architecture is ...


4

There were several reasons, many of which you listed. First, Bali was a relatively isolated part of the country, after Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, far from the main trade routes (near today's Malaysia). That meant that it was less susceptible to Muslim influences. (It's true that Bali is only a few miles from "Java," but that's east Java, the less accessible ...


4

Unlike war in central plain of China and Europe, Indonesia was covered with heavyrain forest. Size of trees and leaves are way bigger than any other in the world. Therefore wearing armor will only slow the movement and ended up as bull's eye for poison arrows. Medieval Indonesian soldiers were usually chest naked and wearing coloured headband to ...


4

Before answering, I noticed you've asked a previous question regarding China and Southeast Asia (re: migrants to British Malaya during 19th century). I do not know your specific level and area of interest, so I'd like to recommend 2 books: Victor Purcell, The Chinese in Southeast Asia (Oxford, 1981), reviewed here. This book is slightly outdated (but up ...


3

It is because Corregidor is dominated by Alas-Asin at the end of the Bataan. Anyone controlling Alas-Asin can easily shell all of Corregidor. Originally the US fortress on Corregidor (Fort Mills) had only surface fortifications, but the Army realized that the fort was completely vulnerable to a shore bombardment. Therefore, to make the fort a "self-...


2

Answers will vary depending on specific regions, cultures, and time period; many peoples would have been hunter-gatherers rather than farming anything. Millet is an ancient crop in east Asia and may have predated rice in some areas. In coastal communities, fish and shellfish were a major source of food. Animals were hunted (e.g. deer, antelopes, wild pigs, ...


1

Looks Burmese, military police uniform. Person in white uniform maybe be a servant? The monk is holding a palm leaf prayer book ( Pali )


1

According to Wikipedia: The ancestors of present-day Aboriginal Australians migrated from Asia by sea during the Pleistocene era. This has been established mainly by ongoing genetic studies. Why didn't Asians discover Australia first? They did. The Aboriginals were originally asians. They discovered Australia first and settled there.


1

There is no general answer; each reason has its own answer. Japan has a high population density and limited arable land, so the evolution of a mega-city like Tokyo with skyscrapers is a technical solution to a national challenge. Singapore and Hong Kong have a limited amount of land; the only option for increasing space was to grow up. China is undergoing ...


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