11

Yes. Ample supply. At least for print and radio. Newspapers and magazines Not really 'broadcast medium', but mentioned in the question: Many versions printed directly under the auspices of a communist party, and openly sold as such. Example the Peking Review. — West-German National football (soccer) team player Paul Breitner, Maoist at the time, reading the ...


3

Let me add to the previous answer some Soviet media putlets. Soviet Union, a journal published in 18 languages. It had a supplement called "Sports in the USSR". Moscow news - a newspaper published in English. (In 1970s this was the only periodical in English available to most Soviet citizens, so students read it to practice their English:-) There ...


3

I think this one could be answered on two levels, one a more general one which I'll attempt, and the other a very specific one that looks into the motivations of the Soviet leaders of the time. I'm sure someone has some notes by Khrushchev why this was a desired move by the USSR. Some terminology should be clarified first. The PRC did not "enter" ...


2

In addition to the answer above, I have information from an old Washington Post article mentioning how certain Afghan rebels who engaged in guerilla warfare against the Soviet Union were trained by Egypt. Egypt is training Afghan rebels in guerrilla warfare and plans to arm them and send them back to Afghanistan to combat Soviet intervention forces, the ...


1

Question: Did the Soviet Union or its satellite states have any broadcast propaganda media for an international audience? The official international radio service for the Soviet Union was Radio Moscow, or Radio Moscow International Broadcast Service. Its first broadcast was in 1923 in German. By 1931 it operated under 8 languages, By 1970 it broadcast in ...


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