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2

The head commander, Meretskov, was upgraded after the winter war, in spite of all his inability. So, definitely, the answer is "no".


1

Evacuation of Soviet Industry in World War II The following shows that Soviet leadership had been aware of the strategic risk they faced due to the concentration of vital industry in the west of the country for many years and had been investing in the rapid development of the interior and east as a precaution against attack from enemy airpower. The ...


1

An important question about those sorts of actions is the logistic cost and the risk of escalation versus gains. In Swedish waters, such intrustions meant: Political gains as Russia enforce its capacity to be a threat Military gains about knowing waters where they could be landing during WW3 Low risks for the submarines to be attacked since Sweden was not ...


0

It has nothing to do with percentages, but with agreement between Yugoslavian communists and Soviet communists. Tito was in contact with Comiterna throughout the war and when Soviets came to Yugoslavia. That was in fact the only allied territory, unlike all others who fought against them in one way or another. British absolutely didnt have a say in post ...


8

German Plans for amphibious landings in the Black Sea at Taman and Tuapse in support of Fall Blau in 1942. Kriegsmarine Marinefährprahme (MFP) in the Black Sea. (from Kriegsmarine: The Forgotten Service) Fuhrer Directive 43, issued on 11th July 1942, which detailed Plan BLUCHER, the proposed operations of the German 11th Army in crossing the Kerch Strait ...


6

No, except across narrow Kerch strait First, Axis forces in Black Sea were relatively small, and mainly consisted of Romanian navy (with few destroyers) with some German light naval units (Type II coastal submarines, some torpedo and patrol boats, armed barges etc ...) . Or in other words, units designed more for sea denial then for sea control . Romanians ...


6

If this was considered, it has left no trace in written history. It is not mentioned in the relevant volume of Germany and the Second World War (Volume VI/II, pp. 843-863, "The Decision for Operation Blue"), nor in Warlimont's memoirs (pp. 226-233 of Inside Hitler's Headquarters, 1939-45) or Doenitz's (Searched the whole electronic text, no mention of ...


2

Providing English translations and expanding upon the answer by @James Slides referencing the brief exchanges of fire between forces from the German 1st Mountain Division and elements of the Soviet Volotchitsky Army Group near Lviv in 1939. September 19th, 1939, near Lviv At 5.00, the commander of the 24th LTBR Colonel P.S. Fotchenkov ordered the ...


1

Yes, there was a plan - but was it Stalin's? The question is somewhat skewed in asking whether "Stalin" himself had a plan to fight the Germans. There is a documented plan which was presented to Stalin by the Operations Directorate of the General Headquarters of the Red Army in May 1941 which outlined a proposal to attempt to preempt a possible German ...


1

The below map provides a broad view of the oil logistics of the Caucasus, Caspian and Middle Eastern regions during the Second World War. Railways, shipping lanes, and pipelines are shown, connecting the existing oil centres of the region to the wider world. The flow of Caucasus oil to the Soviet Union would already have been considerably interrupted once ...


0

The supplement to Hitler's Fuhrer Directive 33, Fuhrer Directive 33a, issued on 23 Jul 1941, stated: "The enemy forces which are still west of the Dnieper must be decisively defeated and dispersed. As soon as the state of operations and supplies allows, First and Second Panzer Groups will be concentrated under command of Fourth Panzer Army and, with ...


1

Car insurance (and other private property insurance) existed, and was mandatory. The only difference in this respect with capitalist countries was that the insurance company belonged to the state, and there was no choice of insurance company, and no competition between them.


8

At USSR times, there was so called GosStrakh system (short form of Gosudarstvennoe Strakhovanie, aka Government Insurance). From 1946, it started car insurance program as well. However, as any other insurance company, it had very contradictory reputation.


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Actually, there was a famous Soviet movie from 1966, Береги́сь автомоби́ля, whose plot centers around car insurance: The main character sells car insurance during the day and steals the insured cars at night and, after selling stolen cars, donates the proceeds to orphanages. (No, he is not crazy, he even has a document certifying his sanity.) The movie is ...


9

USSR did allow private property over personal-use items, which included cars and even houses or apartments. What was not allowed was private property over commercial or industrial assets ("means of production"), or private business (they turned a blind eye towards self-employed stuff like tutoring or handyman services) There was personal insurance in Soviet ...


4

Cars in the USSR were not government issued, unless they were company cars so to speak, just as in Western countries. You saved up for one, ordered one, and waited until it was delivered. Difference is that the number manufactured was planned, and independent of actual demand, so you would likely have to wait for 5-10 YEARS for delivery. Jalopnik is an ...


3

Transportation Hub Moscow was the major railway transport center: Losing Moscow would have made moving fuel to the already besieged Leningrad even harder. In this regard, Moscow was even more important than Stalingrad (which controlled the flow of oil from Baku along Volga). Industrial Center Before the war, about 30% of Soviet defense industry was in ...


2

How close was the Soviet Union to collapsing during WW2? Short Answer If not for heroic action by the Soviet Army at Moscow, the coldest European winter of the 20th Century, a poor German logistics line, and massive western aid the Soviet Union might have collapsed. We know this because Stalin made peace overtures to Hitler through Sweden ...


1

Unfortunately I can't recall specific details but while visiting a museum of Ukrainian Nationalism in the city of Lviv in the 1990s I remember seeing a huge map covering an entire wall showing acts of terrorism allegedly committed by Ukrainian nationalists all across the Soviet Union -- there were a LOT of them and of course mostly within the territory of ...


5

Acknowledging the other answers which have indicated that there is no way of really knowing how close the Soviet Union came to collapsing during the Second World War, mainly because there is no way of knowing what might have been the key or critical variables that would have brought about a collapse with any certainty. Nevertheless, both the Axis and Allied ...


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