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1

Admiral Kuznetsov's finest hour June of 1941 was hectic month in Moscow. More and more reports from agents, spies, military attaches, aerial and other reconnaissance, were confirming the fact that Germany prepares for an attack on USSR in coming days. Much was written about Stalin's indecisiveness in those days, as he was getting more and more aware that war ...


1

The USSR ceased to exist to objective economical, political and ideological reasons, that were accumulating for many years (at least from the late 70-s). So of course no referendum could stop the objective decay of the system.


1

Two parts for the answer: Sneak attack at the beginning of the war: Pearl Harbour was the biggest sneak attack of the Japanese plan. Smaller sneak attacks included raids on Philippinese airfields. June, 22nd 1941 was a very big sneak attack over all the German-Russian front. The Luftwaffe had so much to do against Soviet air and land based assets for the ...


7

(This answer was originally here: https://history.stackexchange.com/a/32715/1569) In brief The referendum was not about "continued governance by the communist party" because by the time the referendum was held the communist party had already effectively abdicated its power - the train had certainly left that station by then. What the referendum did ...


13

Yes, most citizens had spared some documents, or they could order a transcript from the state archives. It may be surprising, but most of the documentation survived during the war, and it was also kept in order during the Soviet rule. Some people who were born in Abrene district, now in Russia, had to request the Russian archives for a copy of their record, ...


7

I'm not sure how they did this in practice, but Article 13 of this Law creates a lot of tracks to become a citizen without going through naturalization: Article 13. Exceptions to naturalization requirements (1) After this Law comes into force, citizenship of Latvia can be individually granted to persons: one of whose parents is a Latvian or a Liv and who ...


7

I was born in Moldova (one of the former 15 republics of the USSR). After the break of the Soviet Union my parents (one was born in Russia, the other one in Ukraine) obtained the Moldovan citizenship as they lived in Moldova at that time of the break and owned real estate there. I got Moldovan citizenship as I was born in Moldova. Later on my mom got her ...


49

This question gets really complicated really fast. After the breakup, each of the former Soviet republics established its own set of laws, and then these laws were rewritten multiple times. The region also includes half a dozen unrecognized states (Transnistria, Artsakh, Abkhazia, Ossetia, DPR, and LPR) each of them having its own very original definition of ...


14

There were several rail lines east of Volga First, let's look at the map of soviet rail lines in 1941 with accompanying legend As we can see, there are two rail lines, both of them single track and normal gauge. One goes from Astrakhan and split towards Stalingrad and towards Saratov. This one is likely used to supply Stalingrad front. Other is more to the ...


13

Considering the statement "post-Soviet states grant citizenship primarily on the basis of blood, and not birthplace": the two shouldn't be seen in contradiction in this case. Jus sanguinis means transmittance of citizenship between generations. But as republican citizenship lost its importance after 1978 (see below) the place of birth or residence ...


3

In the Soviet Union every citizen had a "nationality", which was indicated in his or her identity card (internal passport). This could be Russian, or Ukrainian, or Kyrgyz, or Jewish, or any other. In principle, a citizen inherited the nationality of his or her parents; it did not depend on place of residence. If the parents were of different ...


2

On paper, the USSR and its subdivisions were "super-parliamentary republics" in that the highest body with direct power was the Supreme Council. It had enormous power and it could do everything in the country, often with simple majority. There was no veto power invested in anybody against the decisions of the Supreme Council. The very Russian word &...


9

General Division of Responsibilities The division of responsibilities was roughly similar to that at the national level: the decisions were made at the party committee (and both Soviet chairman and executive committee chairman were members thereof, together with the police and KGB bosses) under the guidance of the secretary, and the Soviet chairman was ...


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