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To get this question from the "unanswered" list: The journal was called "Communist" ("Коммунист") between 1952-1991; earlier (1924-1952) it was published under the name "Bolshevik." See here.


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Geopolitics It is important to point out that Stalin's support for Israel had not necessarily be ideological, but rather a question of geopolitics. The Soviet Union did vote for the UN partition plan, and was quick to recognize the newly proclaimed state of Israel (as has been pointed in the answer by @DVK). In this sense the Soviet policy was mirroring the ...


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Germany didn't need more coal. They had plenty available in the Ruhr and Silesia, and a reasonably adequate ability to mine it. Depriving the USSR of access to that coal was somewhat useful, but nothing like as useful as depriving the Soviets of Caucasian oil, and getting that oil for themselves. Trying to work the captured coal mines would have required ...


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The Germans were not capable of using those captured coal mines: Russian tracks are wider than European tracks. The Russians destroyed as much as possible of the tracks and locomotives as possible when they withdrew. The Germans couldn't use USSR railroads, because there weren't any left. Building their own tracks was possible, but to a limited extent due to ...


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Examples of the losing side getting a net gain in land could be hard to find, but some countries got some land despite being in the losing side. Spain was in the losing side in the Seven Years war. However in the treaty of Paris (1763) it got the Louisiana from France in exchange for having ceded the Floridas to Britain. Measured by area, that's a large net ...


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The question is based on wrong premises: Bulgaria entered the war on the Axis side for many reasons, first of which being it gained territory on Romania (which was part of Axis as well). Many reasons explained why Romania, under German pressure, accepted to lose territory to many countries: USSR, Hungary, Bulgaria. That is outside the scope of the question. ...


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At some point following Barbarossa there was a severe reduction in domestic production of ball bearings: Beginning in September, and right to the end of 1941, a decline in industrial output occurred. At the end of 1941, industrial production amounted to only one-half of the prewar level. The output of nonferrous rolled metal, cable products, and ball ...


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