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The 863K losses come from Krivosheyev's research. These are very precise numbers and unless one is a professional historian who did research in this specific field, he cannot objectively question these numbers. The research Krivosheyev did is monumental and acknowledeged worldwide (see Glantz). That precision is absolutely sufficient for discussions online. ...


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First: Is propaganda on either side a strong force for these numbers? Yes, the table of causalties for Kursk is strictly debated because there was a lot of propaganda involved. On the Soviet side: Contrary to Stalingrad for example, where a Soviet dead soldier could be given as a "victim" of Nazi's cruelty, defending civilians in a besieged city, ...


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Not a Realistic Prospect for Supporting a Major Operation The logistics into the Kuban bridgehead were extremely fraught, and not at all reliable as a basis for using the bridgehead as a springboard for a renewed German major offensive into the Caucasus in 1943, or later. The cable car across the Kerch Strait, which the Germans brought into service in May ...


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Good defensive position but nothing much else Although Germans painted Kuban bridgehead as a bridgehead, i.e. the place from which they could start a new offensive into Caucasus, reality on the ground was somewhat different. First of all, geographically speaking area is divided into three parts by Caucasus mountains themselves. You have northern part which ...


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Geopolitics and distrust among Allies When we look at geopolitical situation in Europe between world wars, we could roughly divide all countries into three groups. First would be so called conservative group, ranging from parliamentary democracies to monarchies that wanted to keep status quo. Typical representatives of this group would be Britain and France, ...


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In 1943, the document containing Red Army serviceman's service record was called "книжка красноармейца" (lit. "Red Army man's book"). It was introduced by the order №330 of People's Commissar of Defense of the Soviet Union. According to the article 9 of that document, documents of soldiers leaving service were to be transferred to the ...


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The answer is quite simple. Because of the resistance of the Forest Brothers until the mid 50s, Stalin respected the Lithuanians. So Sneikus was able to tell Stalin he didn’t want the former East Prussia, Stalin respected his wishes. Obviously different than you can’t say no to Stalin one poster suggested here.


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The Soviets and the Japanese were fighting in the Kuril Islands as late as 4 September 1945. For a somewhat sparse description, that at least has some dates, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_the_Kuril_Islands


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No Delay to BARBAROSSA -- But Significant Implications Firstly, as a teaser, it is worth pointing out that Hitler himself did quite explicitly blame Mussolini's failures in Africa and the Balkans for undermining his invasion of the USSR, in his famous recorded conversation with Marshal Mannerheim of Finland in May 1942. He made mention of the permanent loss ...


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Unlikely, because Germans were stopped by casualties and unexpected Soviet resistance It is a well known fact that original date for the start of Operation Barbarossa was May 15th, 1941. It was delayed for 38 days, finally starting on June 22nd, 1941. Possible reasons could be Invasion of Yugoslavia (6–18 April 1941) , simultaneous invasion of Greece (...


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It didn't influence Operation Barbarossa significantly. What stopped the German advance? The tenacious defence of the Red Army. When the Germans kicked in the door, the house didn't come down crashing as they expected. Among other factors, the Rasputisa, or the muddy season. That is actually not one, but two seasons: The autumn rains, when roads become ...


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There are a lot of other great answers, but I remember a couple of Soviet movies from the 1930s (for instance, Jim Ripple's robot of 1935) where scientific organization of labor was condemned and labelled as "fascism". In the aforementioned film, a scientist at an industrial plant in capitalist country performs an "experiment" on a worker:...


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The decision to execute A.K.Gastev came from the very top. Quoting from the article "Central Institute of Labour" from the materials of the International Memorial, aka Мемориал, Согласно исследованию А. Ткаченко-Гастева, правнука А. К. Гастева, решение о казни основателя ЦИТа связано с постановлением Политбюро от 8 апреля 1939 года расстрелять 198 ...


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To partially complement some of the other answers, let me mention the existence of Mir Publishers. Lots of titles mentioned here. When I was a math undergrad in Argentina, in the 1980s, we would all buy the Soviet textbooks because they were the cheapest. Also, they were in Spanish, which was preferable for many students who lacked enough command of English. ...


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Sorry, this question has been here a while... But seems it still awaiting an answer Gastev researches and work were not the reason of his persecution. You actually listed the major reason in your question, by the way. There is a common (but mistaken) notion that revolutionary movements that overthrew royal dynasty was something solid. It was not. ...


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To publish any material in a foreign journal or present a report on international conference, Soviet authors would have to get an approval from a special clearance department that existed in every educational and scientific institution (universities, research institutes, etc.) You would bring your paper to this department and their goal was to see if you are ...


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It depends a lot on timing, but I can make some general comments. (I got my PhD in theoretical chemistry in 1976, so I've been following this to some extent since the late 60s.) First, there is a huge, sharp, big distinction between military research and everything else. Most military stuff is classified and both sides tried their best to keep that from ...


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The policies very much varied with time. Even more they differed between scientific institutions in USSR. First of all, there was always scientific exchange through publications. Until the middle of 1930s Soviets could publish papers in Soviet journals in foreign languages. Later this was prohibited and publication abroad strongly discouraged. But since ...


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